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Full text of "Annual report of the Federation of Jewish Charities, San Francisco, Cal"

CALIFQftNIANA 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 03475 6891 

5AN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 




BOOK NO 



360.979 F31- 



453315 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY 



Form 37 10M 11-35 



^ISCTH 




L REPORT 



DERATION 
JEWISH 
ARITIES 



k N FRANCISCO 
iLIFORNIA 



FOR 



ING DECEMBER 31, 1915 



Sixth Annual Report 



of the 



Federation 
of Jewish Charities 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

ORGANIZED JUNE 1. 1910 



For the Year 
Ending December 31, 1915 



Office 

436 O'FARRELL STREET 

Telephone Franklin 546 



*3fo0.97<? fo 
453315 



CONSTITUENT SOCIETIES 



Emanu-El Sisterhood 

Eureka Benevolent Society 

First Hebrew Benevolent Society 

Free Burial Society (Chevra Kedusha) 

Free Loan Association (Chevra Gemilus Chasodim) 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 

Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Society 

Jewish Educational Society 

Jewish Ladies' Relief Society 

Ladies' United Hebrew Benevolent Society 

Mount Zion Hospital 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society 

The Helpers 



FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES 



OFFICERS 1916 

President 
I. W. Hellman, Jr. 

First Vice-President 
Henry Sinsheimer 

Second Vice-President 
Morgan A. Gunst 

Treasurer 
Mark L. Gerstle 

Secretary 
Meyer H. Levy 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 1916 



Louis Abrahams 
Mrs. I. S. Ackerman 
Simon Anspacher 
A. Aronson 
Mrs. Lina Badt 
Frederick Baruch 
Albert M. Bender 
Sylvan L. Bernstein 
Manfred Brandenstein 
A. L. Brown 
Albert E. Castle 
S. M. Ehrman 
Mrs. Matilda Esberg 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
Mark L. Gerstle 
Alex. Goldstein 
David J. Guggenhime 
Morgan A. Gunst 
Abraham Haas 
Louis Haas 
Joseph Haber, Jr. 
Joel K. Hecht 
I. W. Hellman, Jr. 
Charles Hirsch 



Joseph Hyman 

Emile Kahn 

Mrs. Flora Kalisky 

J. B. Levison 

Emile Levy 

Maurice Liebmann 

Mrs. Sophie Lilienthal 

A. Mack 

Henry S. Manheim 

Isaac Moss 

Rev. J. Nieto 

Lesser Prager 

Louis A. Schwabacher 

Sig. Schwabacher 

Mrs. Maurice Schweitzer 

Henry Sinsheimer 

Mrs. Joseph C. Sloss 

Hon. M. C. Sloss 

M. Spiegelman 

A. C. Springer 

Mrs. Jesse Steinhart 

Miss Hilda Steinhart 

Otto Irving Wise 

Samuel I. Wormser 



LIST OF REPRESENTATIVES TO THE BOARD OF 
GOVERNORS 

ACCORDING TO SOCIETIES 

Emanu-El Sisterhood. 

Mrs. Matilda Esberg Mrs. Joseph C. Sloss 

Eureka Benevolent Society. 
Simon Anspacher Charles Hirsch 

Frederick Baruch Sig. Schwabacher 

Sylvan L. Bernstein Henry Sinsheimer 

Morgan A. Gunst Otto Irving Wise 

Joel K. Hecht Samuel I. Wormser 

First Hebrew Benevolent Society. 
Louis Abrahams A. Aronson 

Lesser Prager 

Free Burial Society. 

Mrs. Flora Kalisky 

Free Loan Society. 
M. Spiegelman 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled. 

Albert M. Bender Emile Kahn 

Joseph Hyman Emile Levy 

Isaac Moss 

Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Society. 

Mrs. I. S. Ackerman 

Jewish Educational Society. 
Rev. J. Nieto 

Jewish Ladies' Relief Society. 

Mrs. Maurice Schweitzer 

Ladies' United Hebrew Benevolent Society. 
Mrs. Lina Badt 

Mount Zion Hospital. 
Abraham Lincoln Brown J. B. Levison 

Albert E. Castle Maurice Liebmann 

Mark L. Gerstle A. Mack 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. Henry S. Manheim 

A. C. Springer 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 

Manfred Brandenstein Louis Haas 

S. M. Ehrman Joseph Haber, Jr. 

Mortimer Fleishhacker Louis A. Schwabacher 

Alex. Goldstein Hon. M. C. Sloss 

David J. Guggenhime Mrs. Jesse Steinhart 

Abraham Haas Miss Hilda Steinhart 

The Helpers. 
Mrs. Sophie Lilienthal 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FEDERATION OF 
JEWISH CHARITIES. 



Executive Committee. 

I. W. Hellman, Jr., Chairman 
Term expires March, 1919 

Term expires 

A. Aronson March, 1919 

Albert M. Bender . ... ..March, 1917 

Sylvan L. Bernstein March, 1918 

Manfred Brandenstein March, 1917 

Mark L. Gerstle March, 1919 

Morgan A. Gunst March, 1918 

Henry S. Manheim March, 1917 

Henry Sinsheimer March, 1918 

Finance Committee. 

Sig. Schwabacher, Chairman 
Frederick Baruch Abraham Haas 

Subscription Committee. 
Otto Irving Wise, Chairman 
Sylvan L. Bernstein Louis Neustadter 

Jacob Blumlein Robert A. Roos 

Mortimer Fleishhacker Sydney Schwartz 

Adolph Mack Louis A. Schwabacher 

Statistics and Uniform Accounting 

Henry S. Manheim, Chairman 
Louis Greenhood Henry G. Meyer 



^iteration of Swmalj QIIjartlt^B 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Governors and Members of the 

FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES. 

Ladies and Gentlemen: 

We are assembled here tonight for the specific pur- 
pose of rehearsing the story of the year's stewardship 
of our trust and to gain new inspiration, renewed cour- 
age and strength to carry forward the great work 
inaugurated by- our organization six years ago. 

When this Association was formed in 1910, it had for 
its object the centralization of the collection of funds 
for the benefit of all of the Jewish charitable organiza- 
tions of San Francisco, it being thought that in this way 
a larger amount could be collected for each worthy 
charity, and unworthy charities could be practically 
eliminated. It was originally proposed that the Federa- 
tion should be simply a collecting body, and that its 
sole duties were to collect funds and to distribute them 
among the various constituent societies in accordance 
with their needs. Experience has taught us, however, 
that in order to make a proper distribution it is neces- 
sary for the Executive Committee of the Federation to 
be in closer touch with the various organizations than 
its members have been able to be in times gone by. For 
that reason we changed our by-laws at the last annual 
election. We have also learned that whereas the col- 
lection of funds by only one body prevented duplication 
of expenses on that side, in the work of the various 
constituent organizations there was still much duplica- 
tion, and therefore waste. 

In order to get more complete information on this 



point, our Executive Committee decided to employ the 
services of Jacob Billikopf, of Kansas City, who is con- 
sidered one of the most prominent charity experts in 
America, to make a survey of all of the Jewish chari- 
table institutions in San Francisco. His report has been 
of much service to us. 

Also, great economies in the purchase of supplies for 
the various institutions could be made, providing one 
general agency was appointed. With these two objects 
in view, the Executive Committee have passed a reso- 
lution dividing the work and creating two distinct de- 
partments. To the head of the first department we 
have elected Meyer H. Levy, who will be known as the 
managing secretary of the Federation, and who will 
have, together with the Purchasing Committee, full 
charge of the financial business end of the Society. For 
the position of superintendent of social service, we en- 
deavored to obtain the services of Jacob Billikopf, but in 
spite of long efforts on our part, we were unfortunately 
not successful. We are, therefore, taking the necessary 
steps to obtain the best man available, so that the work 
which has been mapped out may be carried forward. 

It affords me great pleasure to acknowledge with 
thanks the enthusiastic support which I have received, 
and the excellent work done by the other officers of this 
Federation and the members of the Executive Com- 
mittee. I also desire to give testimony to the untiring 
and excellent work done by our secretary, Meyer H. 
Levy. 

The year's receipts from subscriptions and member- 
ship dues amounted to $136,532.55, exceeding those of 
last year by the sum of $5,329.45, and $14,970.94 more 
than the first year's income. While other sources of 
income amounted to $12,419.38, making a total income 
of $148,051.93, we are still short some $20,000 of what 
was required to meet the cost of maintenance of those 
organizations dependent upon us for support. 

The total expense of collecting and disbursing this 
sum was $5,170.88, or a trifle over three per cent. 

Included in this income was a bequest of $1,500 left 
by the late F. W. Dohrmann, Sr., and a gift of $2,500 

8 



to our memorial fund from Mrs. Paul Bearwald, Mrs. 
Henry W. Glazier and Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr., in 
memory of their mother, Mrs. Frederick Jacobi, the 
interest of which is only to be used for the purpose 
of our organization. Both of these sums were set 
aside by our Executive Committee to our endowed 
funds and from the net income derived we were able 
to apportion to our constituent organizations the sum 
of $137,579.50, being $3,419.50 more than the previous 
year. 

Unfortunately in last year's report of contributions 
an error was made in the donation given by Mrs. Selma 
Schoenfeld and family in honor of their husband and 
father, Jonas Schoenfeld, and we want to acknowl- 
edge this generous gift now. 

We do not think that any of our constituent societies 
have had any just cause for complaint on the score of 
partiality. Each has received considerably more than 
it was ever able to collect by its own efforts and we 
believe they all agree that we disburse the funds en- 
trusted to us for disposition without favor. We have 
only the highest praise for the officers and directors of 
each and every one of our constituent societies. All 
of them have devoted much time and thought to the 
bringing about of the best results. Economies in dis- 
bursements have been carried into effect wherever found 
practical, and improvements in efficiency and enlarge- 
ment of scope of work instituted in accordance with 
the means at their command. The work done by their 
respective boards and the good accomplished by these 
various organizations have been greater than ever 
before. 

We would have been able to allot a much larger 
amount to our constituent societies, had it not been for 
the inability or unwillingness of quite a number of our 
subscribers to pay their subscriptions, the total uncol- 
lected at the end of the year amounting to $7,870.65. 
These subscribers who failed to pay by reason of indif- 
ference or penuriousness, we must regard with a feeling 
of sympathy rather than censure. Surely the man who 
has not learned to give to his less fortunate brother is 



deserving of our sympathy in his feeble comprehension 
of the duties of life. When we have educated such a 
man into a realization of what is right and proper, we 
will sooner or later receive his earnest thanks. 

We think that our organization has proven itself well 
worthy of the continued interest and support of the 
Jewish community of San Francisco. It is doing a 
great and noble work and from our ranks of sub- 
scribers who have enlisted in such a worthy cause there 
should be no deserters. 

It is true that we are adding new names to our sub- 
scription list and some of our subscribers are increasing 
their subscriptions, but unfortunately, we have as yet 
been able to depend on a very small proportion of the 
Jewish population of San Francisco for support. Our 
work and the demands upon us are constantly growing, 
especially on account of the large number of our co- 
religionists who are fleeing to America on account of 
the terrible European conditions. New institutions are 
needed which have a legitimate claim on our funds, but 
we cannot approve of them because we can see that 
our income is not sufficient to justify their establish- 
ment. To meet the various just claims of the com- 
munity we must be assured of an income of not less 
than $200,000, and how this amount can be raised is 
the problem. 

There must be no backward steps as regards our 
Federation, and there should be no halting and no 
standstill. With the growing sense of social obliga- 
tion to the less fortunate among us, which is teaching 
us that we are responsible one for another, let us see 
to it that every legitimate claim for the instituting of 
any movement which will lessen the human waste and 
human misery constantly surrounding us, is fostered 
and encouraged. 

The difficulty of adding new members grows year by 
year, and our main reliance must therefore be upon our 
present subscribers. To them we must look to supply 
the money. Each member of the Federation can, if he 
or she desires, not only increase their own subscription 



10 



materially without in any way inconveniencing them- 
selves, but can also get for the Federation at least one 
new member. 

I wish to call your attention to the fact that the 
coming year and the years to come will tax our Jewish 
philanthropies as they have never been taxed before. 
For the first time in our history are the hapless victims 
of Russian oppression coming, in increasing numbers, 
from Oriental ports, seeking in this great land of 
liberty, opportunity for independent, decent manhood 
and womanhood for themselves and their posterity. 

This means that our relief funds must be larger than 
they have ever been. It means that our philanthropic 
institutions must become deeper and broader in their 
work, to meet these new and great demands. We must 
give and we must work as we have never given, as we 
have never worked before. Let us not complain nor 
whine beneath our burden; rather let us welcome the 
opportunity that comes to us of transforming the chil- 
dren of poverty and oppression into free, enlightened, 
liberty-loving American citizens. 

I appeal to each one of you to familiarize yourself 
with every one of the many worthy institutions sup- 
ported by the Federation, study their requirements and 
the wonderful work they are doing and after due reflec- 
tion ask yourself whether YOU are really doing your 
full duty toward the poor, the sick, the orphaned, the 
aged and the helpless of our co-religionists. 

Respectfully submitted, 



I. W. Hellman, Jr., 

President, 



San Francisco, March 20, 1916. 



11 



Federation of Jewish Charities 

FINANCIAL REPORT 
For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1915 



INCOME 

Subscription Account 

Total subscriptions for 1915 $135,538.23 

Sundry balances due for 1914 $6,166.05 

Less uncollectible 416.50 

$5,749.55 

Balances transf. from Members' Accounts 5.00 

5,754.55 



$139,292.78 
Less credit balances account 1914 subscriptions 1,214.00 



$138,078.78 

Amount uncollectible at end of fiscal year 1915 $7,833.70 

Less payments in advance for 1916 839.22 

6,994.48 



Total amount collected account subscriptions. $131,084.30 

Membership Dues 

Collected by Federation account constituent societies 2,947.25 

Collected by P. H. O. A. and Home Society 889.00 

Collected by Free Loan Society 966.75 

Collected by Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 645.25 



Total amount collected account subscribers and members.. .$136,532.55 

Donations 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Stern, com. birth of granddaughter. .$1,000.00 
Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Gunst, com. birth of granddaughter 1,000.00 
Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Koshland, com. 25th wedding anniv. 1,000.00 

Mrs. Hannah Gerstle 500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Sig. Schwabacher, com. marriage of son 

'Frank 500.00 

Jesse W. Lilienthal 250.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sinsheimer, com. marriage of son 

Edgar 200.00 

Herman Heynemann 200.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Jules Levy, com. marriage of daughter 

Florence 200.00 

Charity boxes, Temple Emanuel and Home of Peace 

Cemetery 154.35 

12 



Donations — Cont'd 

Ladies' Endeavor Society, Temple Beth Israel 120.00 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Weinstock 100.00 

Leopold Michels 100.00 

Nathan Joseph 100.00 

Mrs. A. Roos, com. marriage of son Robert 100.00 

M. Greenebaum 100.00 

Albert Meyer 100.00 

Greenhood and Jansen 75.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Roth 50.00 

Fred Brandenstein . . 50.00 

Arthur Bachman 50.00 

Mrs. Stella Simon 50.00 

Simon Katten 50.00 

Children's Auxiliary, Congregation Beth Israel 65.00 

Children's Auxiliary, Congregation Emanu-El 37.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Blum 25.00 

Mrs. Henry Newhouse 25.00 

Miss Pansy B. Lewis 25.00 

Mrs. Carrie Jacobs, in memory of parents, Isaac and 

Barbara Federlein 20.00 

David R. Eisenbach 20.00 

John, Nell and Marjorie Pearl Walter 15.00 

From balance of 1906 Fund for Relief of Jewish Educa- 
tional Institutions 15.00 

Mrs. Rosa Susskind 10.00 

John Mack Roos 5.00 

Patricia Irene Roos 5.00 

Raymond Denzer, com. yahrzeit of mother 5.00 



6,321.35 

Bequests 

F. W. Dohrmann, Sr 1,500.00 

Memorial Fund 

From Mesdames Paul Bearwald, Henry S. Glazier and I. W. 

Hellman, Jr., in memory of mother, Mrs. Frederick Jacobi 2,500.00 

Interest Account 

From Treasurer's balance $598.03 

From Bernard Schweitzer Memorial Fund 200.00 

From Mrs. Frederick Jacobi Memorial Fund 65.56 

From sundry bonds 334.44 

1,198.03 

Total income $148,051.93 

13 



EXPENDITURES 

Allotment to Constituent Members 

l\ 11. O. A. and Home Society $37,500.00 

Hebrew Board of Relief 57,000.00 

Mount Zion Hospital 23,000.00 

1 1 ebrew 1 1 ome for Aged Disabled 7,600.00 

Free 1 ^oan Association 2,750.00 

The Helpers 750.00 

Emanuel Sisterhood 4,250.00 

Jewish Educational Society 3,000.00 

1 1 ebrew Ladies' Sewing Society 1,200.00 

Free Burial Society 300.00 



$137,350.00 
Emanuel Sisterhood, extra grant for Exposition social worker.... 129.50 

Prison Reform Committee 100.00 

Mt. Zion Hospital, donation of one Mount Zion Hospital bond... 1,000.00 



Total allotments $138,579.50 

Expense Account 

Proportion of House Expense $ 480.37 

Proportion of Office Expense 2,332.96 

Proportion of Insurance 20.84 

Proportion of Taxes 82.68 

Stationery, Printing and Postage 1,549.08 

Collector's Commissions 704.95 

5,170.88 



Total expenditures $143,750.38 

Income $148,051.93 

Expenditures 143,750.38 



$ 4,301.55 

Less transfer to Memorial Fund $2,500.00 

Less transfer to Endowment Fund 1,500.00 



4,000.00 



Surplus $ 301.55 

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 

ASSETS 

Cash with Union Trust Co $4,272.01 

Cash with Anglo-California Trust Co 1,642.00 

$ 5,914.01 

Bonds 6,774.61 

Mount Zion Hospital, account loan 4,000.00 

Mount Zion Hospital, account proportion of expenses 583.37 

Hebrew Board of Relief, account proportion of expenses 892.07 

Free Loan Society, account dues collected 966.75 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled, account dues collected 645.25 



Total $19,776.06 

14 



LIABILITIES 

P. H. O. A. and Home Society, balance due account 1915 allotment. .$ 4,000.20 

Hebrew Board of Relief, " " " " " . . 3,000.00 

Mount Zion Hospital, " " " " " . . 3,999.80 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled, " " " " " . . 599.80 

Free Loan Association, " " M " " . . 249.80 

Emanu-El Sisterhood, " " w " " . . 249.80 

Jewish Educational Society, " " ." " " .. 750.00 

Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Society, " " . . 199.80 

Free Burial Society, " " " " . . 49.80 

Prison Reform Committee, " " " " " . . 100.00 

Endowment Fund 1,500.00 

Capital Account, January 1, 1915 $4,775.51 

Surplus for fiscal year 1915 301.55 

Capital Account, December 31, 1915 5,077.06 

Total $19,776.06 

MEMORIAL FUNDS 

In Memory of Bernard Schweitzer — 

Invested in $5,000.00 Spring Valley bonds $ 5,000.00 

In Memory of Mrs. Frederick Jacobi — 

Invested in $2,500.00 Union Pacific bonds 2,500.00 

STATISTICS 
New and Increased Subscriptions 

Total amount of new subscriptions received $ 1,652.50 

Number of new subscribers 97 

Increased subscriptions from 150 subscribers 9,526.10 

17 donations secured by Canvassing Committee 1,475.00 

$12,653.60 
Losses 

By death, 25 subscribers $1,957.00 

By resignation, 35 subscribers 793.00 

By decreases, 19 subscribers 672.50 

By suspensions, 85 subscribers 1,440.50 

4,863.00 

Net increase $ 7,790.60 

Amount uncollected at end of 1914 $6,166.05 

Written off as uncollectible 1914 balance 1,993.00 

Amount uncollected at end of 1915 7,833.70 

Respectfully submitted, 

MEYER H. LEVY, 
San Francisco, March 20, 1916 Secretary. 

15 



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San Francisco, June 30, 1916. 

Mr. I. W. Hellman, Jr., President Federation of 
Jewish Charities. 

Dear Sir: 

Upon the completion of an audit of the books of 
account of the Federation and examination of the 
records pertaining thereto for the fiscal year 1915, we 
have the pleasure of submitting our report thereon in 
the form of a Statement of Assets and Liabilities, as at 
December 31, 1915, compared with that of December 31, 
1914, supported by a Statement of Income, Allotments 
and Expense for 1915, compared with 1914. . . . 

During the course of the audit, the accuracy of the 
recorded cash receipts of subscriptions and donations 
was established by inspection of the official receipts 
issued as represented by consecutively numbered dupli- 
cates on file and in addition the former was also agreed 
by comparison with the aggregate cash credits appearing 
upon Subscribers' and Members' ledger cards. 

Disbursements were verified by reference to the origi- 
nal vouchers, and by means of properly signed and 
endorsed bank checks. The bank accounts were verified 
by reconcilement with the several bank statements, and 
the arithmetical correctness of the entries and accounts 
in general duly established. The bonds on hand were 
confirmed by a letter from the Anglo-California Trust 
Company, where they are deposited for safe keeping. 

The Annual Report drawn up by your Secretary was 
also compared by us and found to be in agreement with 
all transactions of the Federation. We have pleasure 
in stating that all the records examined give evidence of 
careful and conscientious attention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Greenhood & Jansen, 

By L. H. Greenhood, 

Certified Public Accountants. 



18 



Reports 



CONSTITUENT 
SOCIETIES 



19 



|larifir ifchrcro ©rplfatt Asglum 

anil 5|0me Botitty 

Incorporated July 25, 1871 

OFFICERS 1916 

President 
JUDGE MAX C. SLOSS 

Vice-President 
ABRAHAM HAAS 

Treasurer 
UNION TRUST CO. OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Secretary 

MEYER H. LEVY 

436 O'Farrell Street Telephone Franklin 546 

Honorary Trustees 

SIG. GREENEBAUM SAMUEL I. WORMSER 

Trustees 

Term expires 

Sylvan L. Bernstein May 1, 1918 

Max J. Brandenstein May 1, 1917 

Sidney M. Ehrman . . . May 1, 1918 

Alexander Goldstein May 1, 1917 

D. J. Guggenhime May 1, 1919 

Abraham Haas May 1, 1918 

Louis S. Haas May 1, 1919 

Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld May 1, 1917 

Leon G. Levy May 1, 1919 

Maurice Liebmann May 1, 1918 

Sigmund Schwabacher May 1, 1917 

Miss Hattie Sheideman May 1, 1919 

M. C. Sloss May 1, 1919 

Mrs. Jesse Steinhart May 1, 1918 

Jacob Stern May 1, 1917 

Superintendent of the Orphanage 
Dr. Samuel Langer 

Superintendent and Matron of the Home for the Aged 
Mr. and Mrs. Gustave Schnee 

20 



STANDING COMMITTEES 1916 



Applications and Admissions — Orphanage 
Alexander Goldstein, Chairman 
Abraham Haas Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld 

Applications and Admissions — Home 

Sigmund Schwabacher, Chairman 
Louis S. Haas Leon G. Levy 

House Committee — Orphanage 
D. J. Guggenhime, Chairman 
Sidney M. Ehrman Maurice Liebmann 

Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld Mrs. Jesse Steinhart 

House Committee — Home 
Max J. Brandenstein, Chairman 
Louis S. Haas Miss Hattie Sheideman 

Committee on Finance 
Jacob Stern, Chairman 
Max J. Brandenstein Maurice Liebmann 

Abraham Haas Sigmund Schwabacher 

Committee on Real Estate and Improvements 
Abraham Haas, Chairman 
Alexander Goldstein Leon G. Levy 

Committee on Education and Employment 
Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld, Chairman 
Alexander Goldstein Miss Hattie Sheideman 

D. J. Guggenhime Mrs. Jesse Steinhart 

Committee on Membership 
Sylvan L. Bernstein, Chairman 
Leon G. Levy Sigmund Schwabacher 

Committee on Bequests and Legal Matters 
Sidney M. Ehrman, Chairman 
Sylvan L. Bernstein Louis S. Haas 

Special Visiting Committee 
Louis A. Schwabacher, Chairman 
Lawrence Arnstein Mrs. M. Esberg 

Mrs. S. M. Ehrman Mrs. M. S. Koshland 



21 



LADIES' AUXILIARY 



President 

MRS. A. L. LENGFELD 

First Vice-President 

MRS. MARCUS KOSHLAND. 

Second Vice-President 

MRS. DAVID N. WALTER. 

Third Vice-President 

MRS. LOUIS SLOSS. 

Corresponding Secretary 

MRS. ABRAHAM HAAS. 

Recording Secretary 

-MRS. CARL RAISS. 

Treasurer 

MRS. SOPHIE LILIENTHAL. 

Board of Managers 

MRS. ABRAHAM BROWN MRS. A. LIEBENTHAL 

MRS. SAMUEL DINKEDSPIEL MRS. ETTA MEYER 

MRS. JOSEPH EHRMAN MRS. MARTIN A. MEYER 

MRS. SIDNEY M. EHRMAN MRS. ACHILLE ROOS 

MRS. DAVID EISENBACH MRS. DANIEL ROTH 

MRS. WILLIAM FRANK MRS. LUDWIG SCHWABACHER 

MRS. J. J. GOTTLOB MRS. JOSEPH SILVERBERG 

MRS. LOUISA GREENEWALD MRS. ISAAC N. WALTER 
MRS. LOUISE WORMSER 



Honorary Managers 



MRS. SIMON BACHMAN MRS. CHARLES KEILUS 

MRS. W. HIRSCHFELD MRS. H. K. ZEIMER 



22 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 



To the Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society: 

Ladies and Gentlemen: 

In accordance with the laws and customs of this 
Society, you are brought together in annual meeting to 
elect five Trustees, and to receive from your officers and 
administrators reports showing the conduct of the 
Orphanage and the Old People's Home during the year 
just passed. It is not my purpose, as your President, 
to enter into a detailed analysis of the various activities 
and occurrences of the year. This field is fully covered 
by the other reports which will be read to you today. 
That of the Secretary contains a full account of the 
receipts and expenditures of the Society during the 
twelve months ending December 31, 1915, as well as a 
detailed exhibit of our assets, with the exception of real 
estate and other property constituting our plant. In 
accordance with what is considered to be the best prac- 
tice of organizations of this character, our land, build- 
ings and equipment are taken up on our books at a 
nominal valuation. 

Much that is interesting and inspiring could be said 
of the work done in the Orphanage, but the report of 
our Superintendent, Dr. Langer, will set forth much 
more thoroughly and effectively than I could hope to 
do the aims which have inspired the Trustees, the 
Superintendent and the staff in their effort to provide 
for the physical, moral, mental and social welfare and 
development of the children. So, too, the report of 
Mr. and Mrs. Schnee, Superintendent and Matron of 
the Home, will make clear to you just what they and 
we have tried to do for the welfare and comfort of 
the old people under our charge. It is not for me, or 
any other member of the Board, to undertake to measure 
the success which has attended these efforts. I should, 

23 



however, be lacking in that recognition which is the 
just due of earnest and skilled endeavor if I did not 
say that every Trustee feels that the conduct of the 
Orphanage and of the Old People's Home has been 
marked by the high standard of administrative efficiency 
which the experience of former years has led us to 
expect from our Superintendents and Matron. The 
management of two institutions like these cannot be 
carried on without a capable and enthusiastic corps of 
assistants. The staffs of the respective institutions have, 
during the year, responded in the most satisfactory way 
to every requirement. 

One or two matters call for special mention. The 
recent death of our Honorary President, Mr. S. W. 
Levy, marks a sad epoch in the history of our Society. 
The Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society 
was incorporated in 1871. S. W. Levy was one of the 
signers of the original certificate of incorporation, and 
one of the fifteen Trustees named therein. He was the 
last of the original charter members. He served as a 
Trustee from July, 1871, to the date of his death. Dur- 
ing the years 1871 and 1872, he was Vice-President. 
He was elected President in 1873, and served in that 
capacity continuously for thirty-five years. In 1908, his 
advancing years impelled him to demand of his col- 
leagues a release from the burdens of the presidency. 
Acceding to this demand with reluctance, they at once 
elected him Honorary President, a position which he 
filled during the rest of his life. He remained an active 
member of the Board of Trustees, giving to the inter- 
ests of the Society the same careful attention and 
devoted interest which he had always brought to the 
performance of his duties as President. His passing 
breaks another link in the chain that binds us to that 
group of big-hearted men and women who, in the early 
days, established the benevolent activities of the com- 
munity upon a firm foundation. Whatever has been 
accomplished, or may be accomplished in the future, 
owes its impetus and its inspiration to them. 

This brings me naturally to the other matter which 
I desire to emphasize. It is well to recognize the great 

24 



things done by those that have gone before, but our 
own duty is not done if we rest satisfied with the 
achievement of our predecessors. Yesterday's problems 
were met, and well met, but we must meet the require- 
ments of today and tomorrow. The main part of the 
present Orphanage building has been standing for forty 
years. The north wing was completed about twenty 
years ago. The structure was an excellent one for its 
time, but in the intervening years the care of children 
in institutions has received much study, and it is now 
recognized that structures radically different from ours 
should be planned and constructed, if we are to continue 
the policy of doing the best that can be done for our 
wards. Furthermore, the present structure has, through 
the natural decay of years, reached a state of dilapida- 
tion which makes it almost beyond the possibility of 
repair. Most important of all, this old frame building, 
housing, as it does, almost 200 children, is subject to the 
hazard of fire involving horrors that we must shudder 
to contemplate. The report of the Superintendent de- 
scribes the condition of the buildings with instructive 
detail. The imperative need for new buildings is not 
now suggested for the first time. The subject has been 
under consideration by the Board of Trustees for several 
years. In the report which I made to you a year ago, 
I spoke of "the urgent necessity, in the interests of 
safety, economy and efficiency, of our supplying proper 
buildings at the earliest possible date." I also mentioned 
the receipt of a donation of $3,000, to be applied toward 
the construction of new buildings whenever the Society 
should undertake such construction. The Society has 
during the past year received $2,000 additional for like 
purposes. We cannot, however, wait until we accumu- 
late an adequate building fund by the slow process of 
voluntary donations and bequests. The time has come 
when the Society must go out to the community and 
solicit contributions in such amount as will be adequate 
to meet this pressing need. I am expressing not alone 
my own views, but those of the entire Board of Trus- 
tees, when I say that we are not, in conscience, justified 
in delaying longer. It is the intention of the Board to 

25 



proceed immediately to make a careful study of the 
nature, character and cost of the new buildings required 
and to then, with the consent of the Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities — a consent that we believe will be freely 
given — institute an active canvass for the purpose of 
raising the sum necessary to enable us to erect proper 
structures and to purchase such land as may be required. 
The Jewish community of San Francisco has always 
supported with whole-hearted enthusiasm the efforts of 
this society to develop its charges into self-reliant and 
self-sustaining men and women. To do this we must 
have a safe and adequate plant and equipment. I for 
one, feel assured that the community will cheerfully 
respond by contributing the sum needed. 

I cannot close without saying a word in appreciation 
of the earnest and self-sacrificing effort shown by all 
of the members of the board of trustees. Much of the 
work of the board is done by committees. Every trus- 
tee is a member of two or more committees. Each and 
every one has given faithful and unremitting service in 
the meetings of the board as a whole, and in perform- 
ing the varied duties of the several committees. 
Respectfully submitted, 



M. C. Sloss, 

President. 



San Francisco, March 26, 1916. 



2(5 



SECRETARY'S REPORT 



To the President, Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 

Ladies and Gentlemen: 

In compliance with the laws of this Society, I beg 
herewith to respectfully submit my annual report for 
the fiscal year ending December 31, 1915 : 

INCOME 
Donations 

James L. Flood $1,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Julian Hart, commemo- 
rating tenth wedding anniversary.. 100.00 
Mrs. S. H. Bachman, commemorating 

marriage of daughter 100.00 

North Alaska Salmon Co 20.00 

Mrs. G. K. Rider, Sacramento 5.00 

$1,225.00 

Bequests and Donations in Memory 

Bequest of Isaac Kohn $5,000.00 

Bequest of Julius Hausmeister 2,500.00 

Bequest of Moses Simon Jaffe 1,000.00 

Bequest of Rebecca Schweitzer 1,000.00 

Bequest of Bertha Triest 1,000.00 

Bequest of F. W. Dohrmann, Sr 1,000.00 

Bequest of Max Popper 1,000.00 

Bequest of Amelia Kullman 1,000.00 

Bequest of Moses Greenebaum 500.00 

Bequest of Jacob Greenebaum 500.00 

Bequest of Lesser Crocker 250.00 

In Memory of Judah Boas from his 

children 250.00 

Bequest of Paul Andornetti 84.82 

15,084.82 

Donations to Home 

In Memory of Judah Boas from his 
children 250.00 

Donations to Technical Training Fund 

Bequest of Dr. A. L. Lengfeld $1,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Juda Newman, com- 
memorating marriage of daughter... 250.00 

1,250.00 

27 



Donations to Permanent Building Fund 

J. H. Neustadter $3,000.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Manfred Brandenstein. . 1,000.00 
In Memory of Mrs. Rose Lewis from 

Martin Triest and Emma Livingston 1,000.00 

5,000.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities 

Apportionment for fiscal year 1915 37,500.00 

State Aid 

For six months ending Dec. 31, 1914..$ 3,634.34 
For six months ending June 30, 1915.. 3,394.25 

7,028.59 

Children's Aid 

From relatives towards support of children 4,045.03 

Rents 

From property on Silver Ave. and Mission St.. 335.00 

Returned Asylum Expense 157.17 

Returned Asylum Insurance 45.42 

Returned Home Expense 152.55 

Home Endowment 

From Adolph Isaac 510.00 

Interest Account 

Interest on bonds and savings bank 

deposits $7,450.80 

Less written off bonds .$277.02 

Less interest due Special Funds: 

Anspacher Musical Fund 360.00 

Premium Fund 324.75 

Herman Behrendt Fund 200.00 

Orphans' Trust Fund 10.21 

Leopold Cahn Fund 120.00 

Technical Training Permanent 

Fund 179.42 1,471.40 



5,979.40 



Total income $ 78,562.98 

EXPENDITURES 

Asylum Maintenance $44,860.91 

Asylum Building 1,267.94 

Asylum Taxes 1,660.39 

Asylum Insurance 960.52 



Total cost maintenance Asylum $ 48,749.76 

28 



Home Maintenance $ 9,982.63 

Home Building 329.95 

Home Taxes 469.46 

Home Insurance 169.55 

Total cost maintenance of Home 10,951.59 

Office Expense 1,686.66 

Total expenditures $ 61,388.01 

Income $ 78,562.98 

Expenditures 61,388.01 

Gain $ 17,174.97 

Less transfer of donations to: 

Permanent Building Fund $5,000.00 

Technical Training Permanent Fund... 1,250.00 

Less written off on bonds 1,550.00 

7,800.00 

Net gain $ 9,374.97 

SPECIAL FUNDS 

RECEIPTS 

Technical Training Fund 

Per Dr. Samuel Langer $ 2.50 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Herman Behrendt Fund $ 400.00 

Leopold Cahn Fund 100.00 

Premium Fund 276.60 

Anspacher Musical Fund 512.00 

Technical Training Fund 223.52 

Band Instrument Fund 24.75 

Orphans' Trust Fund 50.00 

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 

ASSETS 

Cash with Treasurer $ 10,318.13 

Federation Receivable 

Amount due from apportionment of 1915 4,000.20 

Bonds 

5,000 Omnibus Cable Railroad 6% $ 4,750.00 

30,000 Spring Valley Water Co 4% 26,345.00 

10,000 Sutter Street Railroad 5% 9,500.00 

5,000 Northern Railroad of Cal...5% 5,150.00 

10,000 Pacific Electric Railroad 5% 9,500.00 

29 



Bonds— Cont'd 

5,000 Los Angeles Electric 5% 4,550.00 

15,000 Atchison, Topeka & S'ta Fe.4% 13,800.00 

5,000 Oregon R. R. and Nav. Co. . .4% 4,600.00 

11,000 Union Pacific Railroad 4% 10,340.00 

5,000 Baltimore and Ohio 4% 4,500.00 

13,000 Richelieu Investment Co 5% 13,000.00 

5,000 S. F. and San Joaquin R. R..5% 5,150.00 

4,000 S. F. Gas and Electric Co..4i% 3,350.00 

5,000 S. 'F. and North Pacific 5% 5,000.00 

5,000 Los Angeles Railway 5% 5,100.00 

11,000 Southern Pacific Refunding. 4% 9,570.00 

11,000 City of Stockton 5% 11,550.00 

155,000 145,755.00 

Saving Bank Deposits 

Security Savings Banks $ 2,338.40 

Mutual Savings Bank 1,651.70 

German Savings Bank . 3,014.31 

Union Trust Co. of San Francisco 6,580.09 

Savings Union Bank and Trust Co 2,852.65 

Hibernia Savings Bank 2,997.65 

French Savings Bank. 1,602.74 

Union Trust Co., Special Account, Per- 
manent Building Fund 5,000.00 

26,037.54 

Cash with Superintendent of Asylum 150.00 

Cash with Superintendent of Home 100.00 

Real estate 1.00 

Total $186,361.87 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Account $120,000.00 

Herman Behrendt Fund 5,273.25 

Leopold Cahn Fund 3,147.59 

Premium Fund 8,443.54 

Band Uniform Fund 62.30 

Anspacher Musical Fund 9,000.00 

Band Instrument Fund 694.55 

Technical Training Permanent Fund 5,569.16 

Orphans' Trust Fund 1,225.00 

Permanent Building Fund 5,000.00 

Contingent Fund, January 1, 1915 $18,571.51 

Gain for fiscal year 1915 9,374.97 

Contingent Fund, December 31, 1915. 27,946.48 

Total $186,361.87 

Respectfully submitted, 

Meyer H. Levy, 



San Francisco, March 26, 1916. 

30 



Secretary. 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
OF THE ORPHANAGE 



To the Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society : 

It is the purpose of the Superintendent's report to give 
an account of the Institution, more human and vivid 
than are the Secretary's and Treasurer's reports. His 
task is to show something of the life and effort and 
emotion which make this Home more than a mere 
mechanical construction, which could justly be judged 
entirely by financial and architectural criteria. Indeed, 
in self-defense we must insist on a higher criterion. 
While we have lived within an approved budget, it has 
been impossible to keep that budget within our fixed 
income. And as for architecture, we would fiercely re- 
sent having the Institution judged by the building which 
houses it! 

We have had in our care 223 different children during 
the year 1915. The highest register was 196, and the 
lowest was 176. The average daily register for the year 
was a fraction over 188. 

Boys. Girls. Total. 

Register, January 1, 1915, 90 86 176 

Admitted during the year 23 24 47 

Discharged " " " 20 12 32 

Register, January 1, 1916, 93 98 191 

Of the 32 discharges, five boys and one girl went to 
work; five boys and five girls were returned to their 
own families who were found to be well able to main- 
tain them ; three boys were returned to the custody of the 
Hebrew Board of Relief as physically unfit for residence 
in the Orphanage ; one boy was sent to the College of 
Agriculture, U. C. ; one girl was sent to the Training 
School of the Children's Hospital for the Nurse Maids' 
Course; one girl left to pursue a course in a business 

33 



college; six boys and four girls, half-orphans, were re- 
turned to parents who had remarried. Of the five girls 
returned to relatives, two were past fourteen years, and 
both soon afterwards took positions at domestic service. 

Now again, as last year, the register has increased in 
the twelve weeks between the close of the report year 
and the time of the annual meeting, so that we have 
to-day 9G boys and 102 girls. This is very close to our 
greatest capacity. Admissions have been very closely 
scrutinized, and by co-operation with the Hebrew Board 
of Relief, cases which could properly be cared for other- 
wise were not taken in here. It is instructive to note 
that of the 57 admissions from January 1, 1915, to 
March 1, 1916, sixteen were born in California, twenty- 
seven were born elsewhere in the United States, and 
fourteen are foreign-born. The figures reported last 
year showed that our register was nearly 50% born in 
California, and 19% foreign-born, whereas the newcom- 
ers are 28% born in California and nearly 25% foreign- 
born. 

We had a very satisfactory health record throughout 
the year. This is the more pleasing in view of the pre- 
valence of certain diseases in the city. It shows what 
constant care and great skill the medical staff has ex- 
pended upon our children: Dr. Wiel and Dr. Judell 
have been unremitting in their attention. Dr. Baer has 
continued with the ear, nose and throat work, giving 
examinations, treatment and operative care. It would 
serve no useful purpose to set down here the number 
of examinations, treatments, tonsillectomies, etc., these 
physicians have given. The best tribute we can pay to 
their skill is to call attention to the fact that the far 
greater part of their work has been informational and 
preventive, not diagnostic and curative. All this service 
is gratuitous. 

Much to our regret, Dr. Judell has now given up her 
medical supervision of the girls. The pressure of other 
work had long been making it increasingly hard for her 
to continue in attendance here. For nearly four years 
she watched and tended our girls with unremitting at- 
tention and great skill. Her suggestions for general 

34 



health measures, routine examinations and treatment of 
individual cases have all been characterized, not only by 
the scientific merit which is so well known in this com- 
munity, but by a personal interest which has brought 
Dr. Judell very close to us on the human side. In the 
Orphanage building we feel a very real sense of loss 
over her withdrawal. 

We are fortunate to have obtained the consent of Dr. 
Rachel L. Ash to assume the medical supervision of the 
girls, and of Dr. Anna Flynn to take care of all the eyes. 
Through the courteous co-operation of Mt. Zion Hos- 
pital, their facilities in Clinic, Laboratory, Roentgen 
Room, and Operating Room are at the service of our 
wards, and our physicians are promised every facility for 
keeping in touch with such cases as we have to send 
into the hospital for treatment. 

Dr. Constine continues his care of the teeth as effi- 
ciently as ever. Nearly every new admission has required 
considerable dental work. Our large register and nu- 
merous admissions have greatly added to our dentist's 
labors. But it has all been most satisfactorily done. 

This system of thorough study of each child by the 
staff of general physicians and specialists has been sup- 
ported by close attention to hygienic conditions in house, 
clothing and diet. It is undoubtedly better to keep chil- 
dren vigorous by proper food and shelter, than to cure 
them of preventable sicknesses. We have had two cases 
of chickenpox, one of pneumonia and one of diphtheria 
in 1915, although all our children attend public schools, 
and there has been a great deal of scarlet fever, diph- 
theria, whooping cough, measles and chickenpox in the 
city all year long. Nor have we been troubled by the 
typical institutional afflictions, such as ring-worm of the 
scalp. Our children range somewhat below the average 
American height for their ages, but above weight for 
their height, and are obviously resistant to disease. 

Our general plan for formal class work has not been 
changed. The work itself has proceeded in its several 
departments with only such modifications as its develop- 
ment required. The Kindergarten in the Golden Gate 

35 



School has been taken over by the Board of Education. 
As a result, our four-year-old children and those who 
come to us after the opening of the school term, must 
stay at home. The prevocational course in the Crocker 
School was found to be so stimulating and beneficial to 
the boys, that we were encouraged to send more of our 
children to that school. Therefore, at the opening of the 
January, 1915, term, our seventh and eighth year girls 
were transferred from the Denman School to the 
Crocker. The results have continued to be well pleasing. 
Interest and effort are stimulated by concentrating on 
the branches which directly affect wage-earning power, 
and there is more work with less friction. At the same 
time, care has been taken not to impoverish the curricu- 
lum to the extent of making it a mere preparation for 
job-hunting. The children who are expected to enter 
professions, have not been transferred to the pre-voca- 
tional school. 

We have continued the practice of giving high school 
and higher training to all who can profit by it. De- 
pending on the kind of vocation for which they are 
fitting themselves, students are sent to the High School 
of Commerce, Polytechnic or Lowell; one girl is in the 
Training School for Nurses, of Mt. Zion Hospital; and 
one boy is completing his first year in the College of 
Agriculture of the University of California, being sup- 
ported meanwhile by the generosity of Mr. Sidney M. 
Ehrman. These last two children are officially off our 
register, but are very definitely under our care. 

Some children need special training, but either cannot 
spare the time, or cannot profit by any of the ordinary 
high school courses. What to do with them is fre- 
quently a very hard problem. Of course no general 
procedure can be outlined for such cases. But to show 
what has been found for them, it may be mentioned 
that two girls have had the Nurse Maids' Course at the 
Children's Hospital; one girl, through the generosity of 
Mrs. Sidney M. Ehrman, is receiving special training in 
interior decoration; and, by the loyalty and spirit of 
generous recognition of Mr. Aaron L. Sapiro to his 
Alma Mater, two boys are being supported through an 

36 



agricultural course in the California Polytechnic School 
in San Luis Obispo. 

Another class of children who need special care is 
those who are afflicted with a physical, nervous, or men- 
tal twist. This brings us face to face with the very con- 
tentious problems of abnormalities among children, of 
the comparative importance of heredity and environment, 
and of the teachableness of the subnormal. This is not 
the proper occasion for a discussion of these questions, 
but merely for a statement of our experience and result- 
ant practice. Far from finding the appalling percentage 
of mental deficiency reported by some investigators, 
especially among dependent children, we have found very 
little more than retardations due to physical causes or 
lack of early opportunity. It is such cases, however, 
which, when not properly taught, develop into dangerous 
or helpless defectives in later life. The public schools of 
San Francisco are not equipped to meet this situation. 
By discontinuing the "special classes" last year, the 
Board of Education destroyed the very rudimentary ap- 
paratus which was all it possessed to reach such children. 
Encouraged by our previous experience with similar 
cases, and realizing the importance of providing for 
early treatment of children who are atypical, though 
not necessarily subnormal, the Ladies' Auxiliary gener- 
ously provided funds enough to engage a home teacher 
and carry on a special class for six months. So great 
has been the improvement of the children under the 
tuition of Miss Franklin that money for continuing the 
work was included in our budget, as a legitimate appro- 
priation for a purpose no longer merely experimental. 
This wise expenditure of a comparatively small sum now 
may be the effective step to save these children from 
mental and economic ruin for life. 

The regular home classes and lessons are going on 
satisfactorily and steadily. As a means of giving the 
public some opportunity to measure our progress at 
least in the more tangible things, the annual "Premium 
Day" has been made the occasion for an annual exhibit 
of wood work, needlework and cooking. The awards, 
the music, the dancing and the drama which form a part 

37 



of the great day's exercises, help to show also the 
progress in some of the less wholly utilitarian work we 
conduct. Of course, the religious training is never made 
the subject of public exploitation, either by prizes or by 
advertisement. But none the less assiduously do we 
strive to instill high moral standards, through thorough 
religious comprehension. And because we withhold such 
crass material stimuli as gifts or exhibitions for spiritual 
attainment, we try the more to make devotions, cere- 
monial and instruction connote "rejoicing before the 
Lord" rather than "fear of the Lord." Many friends, 
as for example, those who have been with us on Chan- 
ukah or Seder, have helped greatly in this work, and 
can understand our methods. 

It is pleasant to report how successful our Cottage 
has thus far been, and how hopeful the outlook is for 
this experiment. The girls come there knowing how to 
cook and how to clean. In the Cottage they learn how 
to apply their knowledge independently — in a word, how 
to manage. Knowing the elements, they receive prac- 
tical experience in keeping house on a limited income. 
The rivalry as to who can provide best for least money 
is good-natured, but very great. Some of the "econ- 
omical meals" would seem incredibly cheap for the qual- 
ity, quantity and variety provided, were they not veri- 
fied by the list of materials, with quantities, prices and 
food value, which the girls have been taught to prepare 
with the meal. These girls will not be ignorant of how 
to keep house on a limited income, when the time comes 
for them to manage their own homes. 

The way in which our "Cottage Girls" keep coming 
back after they have left our care is eloquent of the 
hold this homelike place takes on them. Practically 
none of them have "dropped out." The smaller group 
and more intimate relationships which are formed there, 
bind the children closer and more firmly to us. 

Many good friends have interested themselves in this 
particular effort, and helped to make it succeed. Special 
mention, however, must be made of the personal work 
and generosity of Mrs. Sidney M. Ehrman, Chairman of 
the Cottage Committee of the Ladies' Auxiliary. She 

38 



has visited frequently, familiarized herself with the ob- 
jects of the Cottage plan and with the girls as well, and 
has just now signalized her interest by having the house 
carpeted and redecorated, from top to bottom, at her 
own expense. 

These special educational features are maintained at 
comparatively small cost, owing to the system of em- 
ploying as members of the house staff only those who 
are trained to give instruction in special branches. 
Nevertheless, the expense would be a serious burden, 
were it not for the Special Funds, of which the interest 
is applied solely to particularly designated purposes. 
The Anspacher Musical Education Fund nearly supports 
the Band. There is a Technical Training Fund, of 
which the income is applied to purchasing supplies for 
the wood-working, sewing and embroidery classes. 
These branches have developed so as to need far more 
money than heretofore. Surely no better way can be 
devised to help the children than to make it possible to 
find out what each one is especially fitted for, and to 
help fit him or her for that vocation. Such is the mission 
of the Technical Training Fund. It is therefore very 
pleasant to announce two recent additions of $1,000 each, 
and one of $250, of which the income will support the 
increased work in sewing and embroidery. It is to be 
hoped that future endowments will provide income 
enough to support the cooking classes and the Cottage, 
so as to lift them above the vicissitudes of annual 
appropriations. 

Preparations are making for a thorough study of the 
after-history of the thousand boys and girls who have 
been discharged from this Institution since its founda- 
tion. It will be hard to accomplish. But the longer we 
wait, the harder it will be, and by using the help of an 
active group of the alumni, it is expected to get a fairly 
complete set of records. 

The purpose is highly practical. We wish to learn 
the success or failure of our former wards, and what 
influences have operated to produce either. Such in- 
formation will have a direct bearing upon the manage- 
ment of the Institution at present, and upon the plans 

39 



for the future. It will enable us to substitute real 
knowledge of the actual effect of institution life on the 
social and economic history of the institution's wards, 
for the mere guesswork which is so often given, and 
accepted, as fact. It will inaugurate a system which will 
prevent any interruption in the relations between our 
former wards and their former home. 

The full value and bearing of exact information on 
this subject is not generally appreciated. Earnest men 
and women have been studying, judging and giving 
advice on methods of child-caring. The institution 
method has become the pet aversion of many, who 
charge that, as compared with family life, it results at 
best in inferior physical vitality, inferior social and econ- 
omic initiative, in weakened or sundered family ties, in 
impoverished social relationships, and in attenuated 
social conscience and sense of responsibility. The foster 
home and boarding-out methods are strongly advocated 
for better results, with a compromise advocacy of the 
Cottage system instead of the Congregate. But on what 
foundation ? There has never been a study of results. 
There exists nowhere a collection of data for such a 
study. It has been thought of but never done. All the 
dicta on this subject are unverified theories, or doubtful 
inductions made from a small percentage of the whole 
number of cases. Titles of publications claiming other- 
wise have proven deceptive. Take Doherty's "A Study 
of the Results of Institutional Care." The title looks 
promising but after all, it gives absolutely nothing of 
results. It is merely another report on conditions and 
methods existing in various institutions. Another pub- 
lication which has just been issued is equally disappoint- 
ing. Slingerland's "Child Welfare Work in California" 
is typical of many recent works on social service sub- 
jects. It assumes absolute validity for very debatable 
standards, and gives arbitrary long-distance judgments 
on the basis of numerical and architectural data, with 
almost no attempt to allow for administrative ideals and 
conditions, and with no pretense at all of investigating 
social results. The fact of the matter is that we do not 
know what effect either institution training or foster 

40 



home care has had upon the after-life of the general run 
of the children who have been subjected to one or the 
other. Therefore comparative evaluations are either 
presumptuous or ridiculous, no matter who makes them. 
What is being planned now is not merely a survey, but 
the inauguration of a system of continuous accounting, 
in terms of complete living, for our wards. 

The necessity of replacing this old building has be- 
come imperative. This has been said so often that a 
repetition generally provokes a smile. But indeed it is 
no laughing matter. To keep this old building habitable 
and reasonably safe involves an enormous expenditure of 
time, labor and money. How sorry a compromise our 
results are with what such a home ought to be, no one 
can realize more keenly than we who live here. Our 
safety devices, our sanitary precautions and our drills 
give us nothing more than an anxious feeling that, come 
what may, we have done our best. 

Year after year, the Secretary's reports have con- 
tained an item, separate from Asylum Maintenance, 
which shows the extravagance of patching a worn-out 
frame. In six years, we have spent just short of $25,- 
000 on extraordinary repairs, on things not included 
under normal "repairs and renewals/' but in addition to 
such charges. Yet only essentials have been touched — 
fire escapes, staircases, plumbing, roofs, walls and floors. 
Nevertheless, we have not overtaken the progress of 
the deterioration. There are even now new white plaster 
patches on recently patched-up walls; gaping cracks 
which have reopened soon after patching; large sections 
of loose plaster which have separated from the laths; 
rough, splintery floors, too far gone for mere patching 
and too bad even to be covered over with linoleum. 
Careful inspection will reveal remarkably little damage 
due to vandalism, carelessness or childish mischief. The 
place is worn out. 

I would repeat, in all the work which has been done, 
only essentials have been touched. Errors of arrange- 
ment are tolerated because it is too expensive to make 
alterations. So, for example, the wardrobes, which 
ought to adjoin the bedrooms, remain on the first floor, 

41 



taking up space which is sorely needed for classrooms. 
A stock room disfigures a choice main floor front room, 
whereas it should be moved, stock and fixtures, to a 
more convenient location in the sewing room. The light- 
ing is bad. The class-room furniture is pathetic. These 
things can remain unchanged because they are only 
nuisances, not dangers. But it is literally true that in a 
few years, lighting, stairs, floors, walls, plumbing and 
our rat-breeding unfinished front basement will abso- 
lutely demand such extensive work as to consume almost 
the cost of a new building, to patch the old house into 
a sorry imitation of what it ought to be. 

Another thing, we should provide accommodations for 
more children. Our register has grown steadily. The 
average daily attendance for the years from 1911 to 
1915 is 155, 157, 170, 172, 188. Our register today is 
198. That is almost the limit of safety. The space that 
remains must be guarded for emergency cases, or cases 
of special urgency, such as have arisen, and bid fair to 
become more numerous. This growth of numbers has 
come about in spite of constant vigilance exerted to 
eliminate unworthy beneficiaries and those whose rela- 
tives have rehabilitated their fortunes and can take care 
of their own children. It is well known that a number 
of applications are so obviously unreasonable that they 
never come formally before the Admissions Committee. 
Still, in 1915, over 25 per cent of the children whose 
applications were actually presented, were refused admis- 
sion. We must provide accommodations for the increas- 
ing number of needy Jewish children, whether native 
born or not. It is unthinkable to build additions to this 
plant. Therefore, not in spite of the heavy demands 
recently made on the charitable of the community, but 
because of the conditions which have made those de- 
mands peremptory, and because of the critical condition 
of our building, the plans for a worthy plant should be 
pushed to speedy fulfillment. 

From the foregoing it will easily be seen that we do 
not rejoice in our building, but in the work which is 
done there. The devotion of a staff of high individual 
efficiency and personal worth has mitigated the hardships 

42 



of our surroundings and given our wards exceptional 
opportunities to enjoy childhood and to prepare for life. 
To each member of the staff, I wish to make due 
acknowledgment of deep appreciation for loyal, intelli- 
gent and skillful service. Nor does any one concerned 
in the management of the Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asy- 
lum lack appreciation of the many men and women who 
have been impelled by pure spirit of helpfulness to visit, 
teach, amuse, or give any form of personal service to 
our children, or give little or much to them for the 
increase of their treasures of substance or of joy. It 
is often remarked that our children have more advan- 
tages and pleasures than most children in private homes. 
Perhaps it is so. But after all, we must not forget that 
it is so because of a dreadful original misfortune which 
has brought them to us, and which can hardly be atoned 
for by the fact that here they meet people who strive 
for their present happiness and future welfare. To all 
who participate in this work, we express the hope that 
they will feel encouraged to continue their efforts, at the 
same time that we express the sincerest thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Samuel Langer, 
Superintendent. 
San Francisco, March 26, 1916. 



43 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
OF THE HOME 



San Francisco, Cal., March 25, 1916. 
To the President, Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society. 
Ladies and Gentlemen: 

When six years ago I first had the honor of present- 
ing my annual report, I was informed that said report 
would stand on record as my best effort, and in the 
future I would find it hard to gather material that would 
prove as interesting to the general public. 

As the years roll by, I find that this prophecy was 
correct. Although our work assumes daily a greater 
fascination and we find more pleasure in our duties in 
the godly work of ministering to the wants of the aged 
and infirm, yet it seems hard to bring before you in an 
annual report, matters that would prove interesting read- 
ing, and to tell you of things accomplished that would 
tend to the better care, comfort, or uplifting of our 
inmates. The very nature of our work is such that it 
varies but little from year to year, and the further fact 
that the Home, long before our advent, had been estab- 
lished on such a magnificent basis that there is little 
room left for any startling innovation. All we can do 
is to follow in the good work established by the noble 
men and women who knew how to build well and last- 
ingly. It is, nevertheless, an infinite pleasure to report 
that, thanks to an all-merciful Providence, our dearly 
cherished hopes to reduce the mortality amongst our 
inmates to a minimum are being realized, and though 
the true adage that "the young may die while the old 
must die" still holds good, the Grim Reaper cannot be 
entirely evicted from the Home. 

During 1915, we were fortunate in having the small- 
est mortality rate ever recorded in our institution, losing 



44 



but two of our inmates, and we sincerely trust that even 
this record will still further be reduced. This senti- 
ment is prompted by our deep and genuine attachment 
to our aged charges, the final parting with them being 
the hardest and most painful task of all our duties. 

During the past year the Home provided shelter to 
forty-one aged people, four withdrew to live with rela- 
tives or children, two are being cared for by this Soci- 
ety outside of the Home and two passed away to the 
unknown beyond, namely, Mrs. Rebecca Rosenthal, aged 
seventy-eight years, and Mrs. Wilhelmina Friedlander, 
aged eighty-six years, thus leaving us at the close of 
the fiscal year thirty-three inmates, thirteen ladies and 
twenty gentlemen. 

It may be interesting to know that amongst our 
inmates we have one woman, now ninety-seven years 
old, who has been under the sheltering care of the Home 
for over twenty years; one male inmate, now eighty- 
seven years of age, who has been with us for over 
twenty years, and another woman, now eighty-seven 
years old, who has been an inmate over twenty-two 
years ; eight inmates whose ages range from seventy- 
three to eighty-five years, that have enjoyed your boun- 
tiful provision and comforts for from seven to eighteen 
years. All, we are happy to state, are enjoying good 
health. 

The excellent physical condition of the Home and 
grounds proves the watchful care given by Mr. Abra- 
ham Haas, Chairman of the Building Committee. Re- 
pairs and renewals are quickly and timely attended to, 
thus preventing deterioration and avoiding large expen- 
ditures at some future time, Mr. Haas believing in the 
motto that "a stitch in time saves nine." 

Through the energetic efforts of Mr. M. J. Branden- 
stein, Chairman of the House Committee, and his col- 
leagues, the Home is enabled to keep up its high stand- 
ard of service at the lowest possible cost. While sup- 
plies and foodstuffs have in many instances materially 
increased in price, our expenses have practically re- 
mained stationary. 

In the death of Mr. S. W. Levy, Honorary President 

45 



of this Society, who during his long career devoted 
much of his time to the Home, this institution lost a 
very good friend. His regular Sunday visits are par- 
ticularly missed by all of us, and we record this fact 
with deep emotions. 

We again mention with thankfulness the courteous 
treatment accorded to us personally by each and every 
member of the Board of Trustees and the Ladies' Aux- 
iliary. We heartily thank the management of the Mount 
Zion Hospital for the kindly consideration given our 
inmates when sent to them for treatment. To every 
patron and patroness of the Home we extend our thanks 
for their visits and the interest they always manifest in 
everything pertaining to our institution. They are giv- 
ing their time and attention freely and willingly to their 
self-imposed duty, and to each of them we say, God 
bless and prosper you ! 

In conclusion, we offer to you, ladies and gentlemen, 
the supporters of our Society, our most sincere con- 
gratulations upon the continued success of our institu- 
tion. Every day, aye, every hour, demonstrates the 
worthiness of your purpose, and the laudable efforts in 
which you are assuaging and bettering the unfortunate 
condition of the helpless old people, providing them not 
alone with shelter, but comforts and luxuries, deserve 
every commendation of man and the blessings of God. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GUSTAVE AND SARAH SCHNEE, 

Superintendent and Matron. 
San Francisco, March 26, 1916. 



46 



Mount 2um ijoapttal 



J. B. LEVISON 

ALBERT E. CASTLE 

JSvmBKttv 
JOSEPH S. SILVERBERG 

MEYER H. LEVY 
iBtrrttorja 

Term Expires 

Frederick Baruch April, 1917 

Samuel Bissinger April, 1919 

Albert E. Castle April, 1919 

William L. Gerstle April, 1917 

Sanford L. Goldstein April, 1919 

William Haas April, 1918 

E. S. Heller April, 1917 

Joseph Hyman April, 1918 

Sirnon Katten April, 1918 

Leon Kauffman April, 1918 

J. B. Levison April, 1919 

Morris Meyerfeld, Jr April, 1918 

Louis A. Schwabacher April, 1919 

Joseph S. Silverberg April, 1918 

Judge M. C. Sloss April, 1917 

Adolfo Stahl April, 1917 

47 



STANDING COMMITTEES 



Executive Committee. 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 
Frederick Baruch William Haas 

A. E. Castle Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr. 

Mrs. Albert L. Ehrman J. S. Silverberg 

Finance Committee 
Morris Meyerfeld, Jr., Chairman 
Leon Kauffman J. S. Silverberg 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
E. S. Heller, Chairman 
Mrs. S. L. Goldstein Louis A. Schwabacher 

Committee on Nurses 

W. L. Gerstle, Chairman 

Mrs. A. Brown Mrs. William Haas 

Mrs. Florence Schloss 

Purchasing Committee 
Frederick Baruch, Chairman 
S. L. Goldstein Mrs. J. B. Levison 

Committee on Pharmacy, Dispensary Laboratory and X-Ray 

Joseph Hyman, Chairman 
Mrs. S. S. Kahn Mrs. H. Lippman 

Committee on Kitchen and Diet Kitchen 

Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. S. W. Heller 

Committee on Domestic Service 

Simon Katten, Chairman 
Mrs. M. A. Meyer Mrs. S. Sussman 

Committee on Visiting and Social Service 
Judge M. C. Sloss, Chairman 
Mrs. Chas. Farquharson Mrs. Albert L. Ehrman 
Mrs. Manfred Brandenstein 

48 



LADIES' AUXILIARY 



President 
Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr. 

Vice-President 
Mrs. M. Brown 

Secretary 

Mrs. Martin A. Meyer 

Treasurer 

Mrs. J. B. Levison 



Mrs. Manfred Brandenstein 

Mrs. A. Brown 

Mrs. S. Clayburgh 

Mrs. Albert L. Ehrman 

Mrs. Charles Farquharson 

Mrs. S. L. Goldstein 

Mrs. Wm. Haas 
Mrs. S. W. Heller 
Mrs. S. S. Kahn 
Mrs. M. S. Levy 
Mrs. H. Lippman 
Mrs. Charles Rosenbaum 

Mrs. Rudolph Samson 

Mrs. Simon C. Scheeline 

Mrs. Florence F. Schloss 

Mrs. M. Siegel 

Mrs. Adolfo Stahl 

Mrs. S. Sussman 

49 



DISPENSARY STAFF 



Surgical 

Dr. Charles G. Levison Dr. Harold Brunn 

Dr. Ernest D. Casper Dr. Roy H. Morris 

Dr. C. E. French Dr. Charles A. Pauson 

Dr. A. Gottlieb Dr. Rorert Patek 

Dr. Chester Harris Dr. L. D. Prince 

Dr. Wm. J. Haber Dr. R. C. Ryan 

Medical 

Dr. E. O. Jellinek Dr. Leo L. Meininger 

Dr. Emile Schmoll Dr. Wm. C. Voorsanger 

Dr. Milton Abrahamson Dr. Adolph Nahman 
Dr. Anna K. Davenport Dr. Ralph Scheier 
Dr. Edith Lamoree Dr. Clara Pratt Sparks 

Dr. Lester Newman Dr. Otto Zaicheck 

Obstetrical 

Dr. Reginald Knight Smith 
Dr. L. I. Breitstein 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 
Dr. Robert D. Cohn Dr. Louis C. Deane 

Dr. Morton E. Hart 

Dr. Anna M. Flynn Dr. E. S. Stadtmuller 

Dr. Adolph B. Baer 

Genito-Urinary 

Dr. Henry Meyer 

Dr. L. C. Jacobs Dr. W. E. Stevens 

Skin Disease 

Dr. David Friedlander 

Dr. G. H. Mize 

Neurological 
Dr. W. F. Beerman 



50 



HOUSE STAFF - 1916 



Superintendent 
Louis Cooper Levy 

Internes 

Dr. Julius Sherman Dr. Farrar Parker 

Dr. H. P. Jacobson M. W. Hollingsworth 

Pathologist 
Dr. D. I. Dorn 

Anesthetists 
Dr. S. S. Ginsburg Dr. James H. McClelland 

Radiographer 
O. W. Ginsburg 

Superintendent of Training School for Nurses 

Miss Janet E. Cameron 

Assistant Superintendent 
Miss P. Cheetham 

Matron 
Miss Bertha Cohen 

Dietitian 

Miss A. Bryant 

Pharmacist 
J. Kraus 

51 



VISITING STAFF 



Surgeons 
Dr. Charles G. Levison Dr. Harold Brunn 
Emeritus — Dr. Julius Rosenstirn 

Adjuncts 

Dr. William J. Haber Dr. Charles A. Pauson 

Dr. Lionel D. Prince 

Physicians 
Dr. E. Q. Jellinek Dr. Emile Schmoll 

Dr. Wm. C. Voorsanger 

Adjuncts 

Dr. Milton Abrahamson Dr. Otto Zaicheck 

Children's Diseases 
Dr. Leo L. Meininger 

Adjunct 

Dr. Clara Pratt Sparks 

Obstetrician 

Dr. Reginald Knight Smith 

Adjunct 

Dr. L. I. Breitstein 

Oculists and Aurists 

Dr. Robert D. Cohn Dr. Louis C. Deane 

Dr. Morton E. Hart 

Adjuncts 

Dr. Adolph B. Baer Dr. Anna M. Flynn 

Genito-Urinary 
Dr. Henry Meyer 

Adjunct 

Dr. W. E. Stevens 

Skin Diseases 

Dr. David Friedlander 

Adjunct 

Dr. G. H. Mize 

Nervous Diseases 
Dr. W. F. Beerman 

Examining Physicians 

Dr. Lester Newman Dr. S. S. Ginsburg 

52 



DISPENSARY AND SOCIAL SERVICE 
DEPARTMENT 



DISPENSARY— 2341 SUTTER STREET 



Superintendent of Dispensary and Social Service 
Director 

Miss Dorothy Meininger 



Investigator 
Miss Jeanette Newman 

Clinical Volunteer Workers and Investigators 

(Follow-up Work) 

Mrs. Manfred Brandenstein Mrs. Adolph Mack 
Mrs. Leo Clayburgh Miss Rita Newman 

Mrs. Louis Goldman Miss Blanche Son 

Mrs. Herman Lowenstein Miss Helen Son 

Miss Cordie Weinlander 

(Outside Visitors) 
Mrs. Myrtile Cerf Mrs. Hyman Jacobs 

Mrs. Chas. Farouharson Mrs. Leon Kauffman 
Mrs. Adolph Gartenlaub Mrs. Max Koshland 
Mrs. Miriam Gerstle Mrs. Reuben Rinder 

Mrs. Sidney Herzog Mrs. Dr. Maurice Wolff 

53 



CONSULTING STAFF 



Surgeons 

Dr. J. Henry Barbat Dr. H. Sherman 

Dr. F. Fehleisen Dr. F. W. Vowinckel 

Dr. T. W. Huntington Dr. James T. Watkins 

Physicians 

Dr. Sanford Blum Dr. J. B. Frankenheimer 

Dr. Philip King Brown Dr. J. Wilson Shiels 
Dr. C. M. Cooper 

Oculists and Aurists 

Dr. W. Scott Franklin Dr. V. H. Hulen 

Dr. Kaspar Pischel 

Diseases of the Nervous System 
Dr. D. D. Lustig Dr. Leo Newmark 

Diseases of the Skin 

Dr. E. D. Chipman Dr. A. E. Regensburger 

Dr. Martin Regensburger 

Diseases of the Geni to-Urinary System 

Dr. Martin Krotoszyner Dr. Melville Silverberg 
Dr. Victor G. Vecki 

Obstetrician and Gynecologist 

Dr. Lawrence H. Hoffman 

Dentist 

Dr. Julius Baer 

Pathologist 
Dr. William Ophuls 

54 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 



To the Members of Mount Zion Hospital : 

It becomes my pleasant duty this morning, as the 
executive of Mount Zion Hospital, to make a detailed 
report to its members of the work during the year just 
closed, and through them to the Jewish community of 
San Francisco, whose stewards the directors are and 
whose approval must in the final analysis be not only 
the test of our efficiency, but also the test of the real 
value of our institution to the community. 

The responsibilities of a general hospital, such as 
ours, its relation to the other charitable institutions in 
the community, and the important part it must neces- 
sarily assume in all relief and social work, are just 
commencing to be appreciated, and I am convinced that 
in the not distant future Mount Zion by virtue of its 
recognized accomplishments will be looked upon gener- 
ally not as an unnecessary institution forced on the 
people by a few over-enthusiastic men and women, but 
an institution of the very highest importance measured 
by intelligent constructive work along broad humani- 
tarian lines. 

I shall ask you to bear with me for a few brief 
moments, as I desire to take advantage of the oppor- 
tunity to explain somewhat in detail what we are doing 
and how we are doing it, even though this may be 
unnecessary to many of those present. As a starting 
point, my mind naturally turns to our clinic, or, as it 
should more correctly be termed, our Dispensary. 
Through this department all patients are now admitted 
to the Hospital — if hospital treatment is necessary — or, 
if not, they are treated here by the members of the 
staff exactly as they would be in their private offices. 
Each and every patient is first interviewed by the 
Superintendent of the Dispensary, Miss Meininger, or 
by one of the corps of volunteer assistants (as enthu- 
siastic and big-hearted a group of women as ever 

55 



devoted themselves to the cause of charity), and after 
a complete history of each case is obtained and recorded, 
it is turned over to the examining physician. 

This interview is naturally also the first step in the 
social service work, as at this time the history not alone 
of the individual but of the family, the conditions of 
the home, the employment or non-employment of the 
bread-winners, and in fact every essential feature is 
thoroughly gone into and developed. And when it is 
borne in mind that most of the calls upon relief bodies 
are the result of sickness which goes hand in hand with 
poverty, I think I am justified in suggesting that the 
most important preventive and constructive feature of 
the work of the Federation of Jewish Charities is being 
done at Mount Zion Dispensary. The work, however, 
does not stop here; many cases are followed into the 
hospital, and many again into the home; but, unfor- 
tunately, the latter is limited by our lack of funds. 

It may appear to some of you a radical statement to 
make, but it is my conviction that eventually much of 
the work now done by the Hebrew Board of Relief will 
be turned over to the Social Service Department of 
Mount Zion, where, after all, it logically and properly 
belongs. 

We are now treating close to one hundred patients 
daily in the Dispensary, which is as many as can be 
taken care of in our present inadequate quarters, but 
in the very near future we will have, as you all know, 
a modern, up-to-date building in harmony with the 
Hospital itself. For this we are indebted to Mr. and 
Mrs. M. A. Gunst, who, with the splendid generosity 
for which they are so well known, have given us not 
alone a sum sufficient to construct the building, but 
have also recently purchased and presented to the Hos- 
pital the land on which the building is to stand. Inci- 
dentally, I may say that Mr. Lansburgh, the architect, is 
engaged at this very moment in preparing plans, and 
promises to have them completed at the earliest possible 
date. 

Before leaving the subject of the Dispensary, I desire 
to give expression to our deep appreciation of the man- 
ner in which Miss Meininger is directing its affairs, 

56 



and especially the sympathetic and, shall I say, the intel- 
ligent manner in which the work is being done. 

In the Hospital proper we seem to have passed 
through the ills incident to infancy and have now, I 
think, approached the point where we may be consid- 
ered a healthy growing child. In other words, with 
1915 we have completed the second year in the new 
building and are encouraged in the thought that our 
organization is slowly but surely reaching the point 
where we will be justified in claiming a maximum of 
efficiency at a minimum of cost. I doubt whether any 
one other than those actively engaged in the work really 
appreciates the size of our institution, which can be 
demonstrated in a way by giving the number of persons 
we employ in the various departments. 

In the nursing department we have fifty-nine pupil 
nurses, eight graduate nurses, the superintendent and 
assistant superintendent of nurses, or sixty-nine all told. 

In the housekeeping and culinary departments there 
are thirty-two, including the matron and dietitian. 

The laboratory, pharmacy, X-ray and clinic call for 
the employment of eleven. 

Engineering and laundry, sixteen. 

Internes, orderlies, etc., nine. 

And in the administration we employ eight, including 
the medical superintendent. An aggregate of one hun- 
dred and forty-five on the pay roll, practically all of 
whom, it should be borne in mind, must be housed 
and fed. 

At this point it may be well to inform you as to the 
real work done in the Hospital, by which I mean the 
number of free patients treated. During 1915, 1,046 
free patients were given 16,581 days' treatment, against 
11,810 days' treatment to 746 patients in 1914, and 
7,839 days' treatment to 509 patients in 1913, when we 
were still in the old building. Can there be any more 
convincing evidence of the importance and value of our 
work? And of the 1,046 patients treated last year, 153 
were maternity cases. In other words, 153 poor women 
came to Mount Zion to be confined, which only those 
can appreciate who are familiar with the service of our 

57 



maternity department, especially when compared with 
the conditions in the homes of these poor women. 

While on the subject of statistics, your attention 
should be directed to the fact that the Dispensary treated 
in 11)15, 15,659 cases, against 10,424 in 1914 and 8,001 
in 1913. These figures require no elaboration nor expla- 
nation. They speak for themselves. 

We now come to the Pay Wing, without which, as 
you of course appreciate, Mount Zion could not exist. 
During 1915, our income from pay patients amounted 
to $104,000.00, against $74,000.00 in round figures in 
1914, a very healthy and encouraging increase, were it 
not for the fact that it is derived so largely from non- 
Jewish patients ; but as it is not my intention to lecture 
or scold this morning, I will simply say that if the 
Jewish community of San Francisco will only assist the 
directors of Mount Zion in their efforts to build up by 
going directly to them with such complaints as they 
think well founded, rather than to tear down by carry- 
ing and repeating every tale that is told them — many 
of which are without foundation — we will the sooner 
reach that degree of efficiency and perfection which is 
our natural goal and ambition. 

To return to figures for a moment. In 1915 our total 
expenses were $133,663.00, against which our income 
from pay patients was, as just stated, $104,000.00 ; our 
allotment from Jewish Charities $23,000.00, and dona- 
tions and bequests about $6,000.00. Of the latter, how- 
ever, a certain portion was given to the Hospital for a 
definite purpose, with the result that the actual deficit 
for the year was a little under $3,000.00. Possibly not 
a bad showing, everything considered; but we prac- 
tically made no improvements or betterments to our 
building. 

I am constrained to express the hope that with the 
return of normal financial conditions, and a realization 
on the part of the Jewish people of San Francisco of 
what is being done at Mount Zion, its governing board 
may confidently look forward to the day when the all- 
absorbing problem will not be finding sufficient funds 
to pay our bills, but rather the extension and develop- 
ment of its activities. 

58 



An important new work which has recently been 
undertaken by the Hospital, to which reference might 
be made here, even though it properly belongs to 1916, 
is the care of the sick in their homes through visiting 
physicians and district nurses heretofore done under the 
direction of the Board of Relief. This, following the 
medical care of the inmates of the Old People's Home 
and Orphan Asylum, is an important step along the 
right lines. 

During 1915, we lost by resignation one of our oldest 
directors in point of length of service and one of our 
most valuable in point of enthusiasm and loyalty — Mr. 
I. W. Hellman, Jr. Mr. Hellman, having undertaken 
the responsibilities of the position of president of the 
Federation of Jewish Charities, felt that he should 
devote all of his available time to its work, and the 
Hospital was therefore the loser. I am led to express 
the hope, however, that he will again return to his first 
love, and with renewed zeal, when he lays down the 
cares of his present position. 

Another loss we have recently suffered in the ranks 
of the board — a great and irreparable loss, I may say — 
is the passing from our midst of our venerable and 
beloved co-worker, Emanuel Raas. While Mr. Raas' 
death occurred in 1916, I feel I would be doing justice 
neither to his memory nor to the Hospital if I per- 
mitted this occasion to pass without voicing the senti- 
ments I know are in the hearts of every one present, 
missing him from this meeting as we all must. Emanuel 
Raas was the last surviving member of the original 
Board of Directors, elected in 1887, and it is within the 
mark to say that from the day of his election until the 
day of his death he was full of hope for our institution 
and enthusiasm in our work. 

As Chairman of the Building Committee, he was 
largely, if not alone, responsible for the acquisition of 
the Sutter Street property and the conversion of the old 
building into our first real hospital building. Subse- 
quently and in the same capacity he supervised the 
alterations and additions to the old building, and finally, 
as a member of the New Building Committee, his wise 

59 



counsel, in the light of his long experience, was fre- 
quently sought and freely given. 

As Chairman of the Hospital Committee, he had for 
many years the main responsibility of the management 
of the Hospital until finally old age led him to lay down 
the reins, and since 1908 he has been relieved from all 
cares and worries, except in the honorary position of 
Vice-President, which he held for the last sixteen years. 

The Board of Directors have passed suitable resolu- 
tions, which will be read presently, and which I shall 
ask be spread in full on the minutes of this meeting. 

Since the last annual meeting, and as was fore- 
shadowed at that time, the old Hospital Committee was 
abolished, and a new Committee, styled the Executive 
Committee, created in its stead. Your President, as 
the Chairman of this Committee, desires at this time 
to express his sincere gratitude and appreciation of the 
unselfish and conscientious manner in which the mem- 
bers of this Committee, men and women, have done 
whatever they have been called upon to do. In fact, 
the same may be said of each and every member of 
the Board of Directors and Ladies' Auxiliary without 
exception than whom no institution ever had a more 
loyal and enthusiastic governing body. And this sug- 
gests a word respecting the work of our Ladies' 
Auxiliary, under the very able leadership of Mrs. I. W. 
Hellman, Jr. When these ladies were first taken into 
our administrative work there were some who feared a 
clash of authority, or a lack of co-operation, and others 
who prophesied absolute failure. After two years of 
experience we can say the experiment has been a com- 
plete success in every particular. The ladies have been 
of inestimable assistance in all committee work, and have 
absolutely silenced all apprehension as to the result of 
what was considered by some a hazardous experiment. 

Early in the year, and after mature consideration, the 
Board of Directors decided to make an efifort to place 
the Hospital on a better financial footing by suggesting 
that the bonds issued at the time the new building was 
constructed be donated to the Hospital by the subscrib- 
ers, so that the floating indebtedness of $40,000.00 might 
be taken care of by a mortgage, which could not be 

60 



done with the bonds outstanding. Up to the present 
time but $56,000.00, out of the total issue of $150,000.00, 
have been returned, so that nothing has been done as 
yet, I regret to say, in the direction indicated. 

As I have already said, our organization generally is 
in excellent shape. Dr. McClelland as Medical Superin- 
tendent, Miss Cameron as Superintendent of Nurses, and 
Miss Cohen as Matron are all fulfilling their duties in a 
highly able and satisfactory manner. 

I would be remiss did I not at this time also pay trib- 
ute to the very excellent work of our medical and surgi- 
cal staff — upon whose efficiency and interest so much de- 
pends. Rarely, if ever, is there any complaint against 
the members of the staff, and the regularity and con- 
scientiousness with which they attend both hospital and 
dispensary have had much — indeed, very much — to do 
with the success of our hospital. 

In accordance with the retirement rule adopted by the 
Board of Directors some years ago, following what is 
being done by similar institutions elsewhere, Dr. Julius 
Rosenstirn, who has been chief of staff since the Hos- 
pital was started, retires from active service with the 
year just closing, and becomes our first Emeritus. To 
Dr. Rosenstirn are we indebted for a great deal during 
his many years of association with the Hospital, not the 
least in point of importance being the use of the dwel- 
ling at the corner of Sutter and Hyde Streets, with 
eight beds, all fully equipped and absolutely without ex- 
pense to the organization. This was the first move 
from what was simply an idea to a reality, and here 
was done our first actual hospital work. When we 
moved into the Sutter Street building, Dr. Rosenstirn 
became Chief of Staff, and for nineteen years which 
have elapsed he has faithfully and conscientiously per- 
formed the exacting duties of that position, as well as 
that of visiting surgeon. Before we adjourn this meet- 
ing, it is our intention to express in a manner befitting 
the occasion, the feeling of the members of the Board 
of Directors and Ladies' Auxiliary towards Dr. Rosen- 
stirn upon his retirement after so many years of active 
service. 

61 



In conclusion, I desire once again to express my 
sincere appreciation of the very great assistance which I 
have received from each and every member of the Board 
of Directors and Ladies' Auxiliary, to which, in a large 
measure, if not altogether, must be ascribed whatever 
success has been achieved by Mount Zion. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. B. Levison, 

President. 



m 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 
For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1915. 



To the Members of the 

Mount Zion Hospital. 

Ladies and Gentlemen: 

In compliance with the laws of this Society, I beg to 
herewith submit my annual report for the fiscal year ending 
December 31, 1915: 

INCOME 

Donations 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Stern, for Chil- 
dren's Free Ward $500.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Kalman Haas 300.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Juda Newman, 

commemorating marriage of 
daughter 100.00 

Samuel Haas 100.00 

Mrs. Emma Livingston, Frankfort, 
Germany, in memory of sister, 
Rosa Lewis 100.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Julien Hart, com- 
memorating 10th wedding anni- 
versary 50.00 

Leo. J. Clayburgh 50.00 

S. H. Wolfe 10.00 

$ 1,210.00 

Bequests 

Bequest of Rebecca Schweitzer $ 1,000.00 

Bequest of Lesser Crocker 100.00 

$ 1,100.00 

Memorial Bed Donations 

From Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr., en- 
dowment of bed in memory of 
mother (Mrs. Flora Jacobi)...$ 1,000.00 

From Mrs. Irma T. Cahn and Mrs. 
Elsa T. Guggenhime, endow- 
ment of bed in memory of par- 
ents — Bernard and Bertha Triest 1,000.00 

$ 2,000.00 

63 



Special Donations 

From Mr. William Haas, towards re- 
construction of wards $ 1,000.00 

From Mr. Abraham Rosenberg, to- 
wards special medical equipment 500.00 

From Mrs. Clara Hellman Heller, 
towards equipment of eye, ear, 
nose and throat department .... 50.00 

From Mr. Wm. L. Gerstle, account 

purchase nurses' blankets 100.00 

From Mrs. Hannah Gerstle, account 

purchase nurses' blankets 50.00 

'From Mrs. Joseph Hyman, account 

purchase nurses' blankets 25.00 

$ 1,725.00 

Hospital Earnings 

Rooms and Wards $ 69,271.70 

Operating Room 13,865.08 

Nurses' Board 5,505.95 

X-ray Laboratory 4,404.50 

Pathological Laboratory 2,603.08 

Medicines and Dressings 6,526.37 

Extra Diet 532.25 

Telephone and Stamps 658.06 

Miscellaneous 686.21 

$104,053.20 
Less, uncollectible 502.12 

$103,551.08 

Interest on Treasurer's Deposits 13.69 

Returned Insurance Premiums 13.12 

Federation of Jewish Charities, allotment for 1915 23,000.00 

Total Income $132,612.89 

Bond Donations 

Mount Zion Hospital Bonds, donated to the 

Society, as per list page 56,000.00 

Total $188,612.89 

EXPENDITURES 

Hospital Maintenance 

Administration $ 10,990.66 

Professional Care of Patients 35,079.05 

Departmental Expense 22,440.27 

Steward's Department 38,182.57 

General Expense 17,474.17 

Store Room Expense 1,154.50 

$125,321.22 

64 



Insurance 915.16 

Taxes 2,833.30 

Equipment 1,255.60 

Interest on Loans 2,519.20 

Office Expenses 819.44 

Total Expenditures $133,663.92 

Income $188,612.89 

Less Bond Donations $ 56,000.00 

Less Special Donations.. 1,725.00 57,725.00 

Net Income $130,887.89 

Expenditures $133,613.92 

Less, Net Income 130,887.89 

Deficit $ 2,776.03 

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 
Assets 

Cash with Treasurer $ 1,286.88 

Cash at Hospital 1,265.56 

New Hospital Building 143,664.45 

New Hospital Equipment 42,788.12 

Patients' Accounts Receivable 5,879.33 

Real Estate— Book Valuation 13,056.00 

Bonds 14,000.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities, balance of allot- 
ment due 3,999.80 

Total $255,940.14 

Liabilities 

Mount Zion Hospital Bond Issue $149,000.00 

Federation, due account prop, of exp. for 1915.... 583.37 

Hospital Bills Payable 16,968.84 

German Savings and Loan Society 6,000.00 

Hydrotherapy Fund 200.00 

Mount Zion and Emanuel Clinic Fund 2,849.93 

Loans — 

Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank$ 20,000.00 

Union Trust Company 20,000.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities 4,000.00 

44,000.00 

Special Donation Fund 1,725.00 

Flower Fund 5.00 

Capital Account, January 1, 1915 $ 7,384.03 

Deficit 2,776.03 4,608.00 

Total $255,940.14 

Respectfully submitted, 

Meyer H. Levy, 
March 19, 1916. Secretary. 

65 



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ipbrau Month of Sfelttf 

Organized 1900 
Incorporated January 13, 1916 



Constituent Societies 
Eureka Benvolent Society 
First Hebrew Benevolent Society 
Jewish Ladies' Relief Society 
Ladies' United Hebrew Benevolent Society 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1916 

Officers 
Sigmund Schwabacher, President 
A. Aronson, Vice-President 
Mrs. Maurice Schweitzer, Treasurer 
Meyer H. Levy, Secretary 

Directors 

Simon Anspacher Joel K. Hecht 

Mrs. A. Aronson Manfred S. Kohlberg 

Mrs. Lina Badt Otto Irving Wise 

Mrs. Louis Goodman Samuel I. Wormser 



COMMITTEES 
Relief 
Sigmund Schwabacher, Chairman 
Simon Anspacher Joel K. Hecht 

Mrs. B. Arnhold Mrs. Charles Isaacs 

A. Aronson Mrs. Hyman Jacobs 

Mrs. Lina Badt Manfred S. Kohlberg 

Mrs. Henry Dernham Mrs. Hugo Rothschild 

Mrs. Sol. Getz Mrs. Nellie Salberg 

Mrs. Louis Goodman Mrs. Maurice Schweitzer 

Mrs. F. A. Haber Samuel I. Wormser 

Finance and Auditing 
Simon Anspacher Henry G. Meyer 

Sigmund Schwabacher 

Pensions 

Simon Anspacher, Chairman 
Mrs. Lina Badt Mrs. C. Isaacs 

Mrs. Louis Goodman Mrs. Hugo Rothschild 

67 



Children's Auxiliary 
Mrs. J. M. Jacobi, Chairman 

Mrs. Henry Abrahamson Mrs. Jules Levy 

Airs. Edward Brandenstein Mrs. Sophie Lilienthal 

Miss Edith Cohn Mrs. Martin A. Meyer 

Mrs. S. L. Dinkelspiel Mrs. Leon Roos 

Mrs. Joseph Ehrman Mrs. Charles W. Rosenbaum 

Mrs. J. J. Gottlob * Mrs. Maurice Schweitzer 

Mrs. J. J. Jacobi Mrs. Melville Schweitzer 

Mrs. Ira Kahn Mrs. Arthur Silverberg 

Miss Alma Levison Mrs. Joseph Silverberg 
Mrs. Henry Sinsheimer 

San Bruno District Committee 

Mrs. B. Arnold, Chairman 

Daly City Committee 

Mrs. Charles Isaacs, Chairman 

Committee on Supplies 

Mrs. Louis Goodman, Chairman 

Committee on Housing 

A. Aronson, Chairman 
Henry G. Meyer Samuel I. Wormser 

Committee on Maternity and Caretakers 

Mrs. B. Arnhold, Chairman 

Committee on Camp 

Mrs. Hyman Jacobs, Chairman 
Mrs. B. Getz 

Committee on Employment 

Manfred S. Kohlberg, Chairman 
Henry G. Meyer A. C. Springer 

Committee on Legal Aid 

Joel K. Hecht, Chairman 
M. S. Kohlberg Otto Irving Wise 

Committee on Tubercular Aid 

Mrs. F. A. Haber, Chairman 
Mrs. N. Salberg Samuel I. Wormser 

68 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Ladies and Gentlemen : 

Again we have the pleasure of presenting to you a 
review of the work accomplished by our organization 
during the past year and to devise methods and means 
by which our labors in the fiscal year, we are now enter- 
ing upon, will produce the best results. 

It is not our intention to enter at length into the 
details of income and expense. The Secretary's report, 
which follows, will make the financial position clear 
even to the least skilled reader. At the same time, it 
may be well to give the salient points for the benefit of 
those who have no taste for figures and are satisfied with 
an outline only. 

The amount of money expended in direct relief was 
$70,641.39 as compared with $77,613.14 in 1914 and 
$77,649.09 in 1913, showing a slight decrease in expen- 
ditures over those of previous years. The cost of ad- 
ministrative expense amounted to $10,177.55, making a 
total disbursement for the year of $80,758.94. Against 
this expenditure we received an allotment from the Fed- 
eration of Jewish Charities amounting to $57,000 ; the 
City and County of San Francisco contributed, for the 
care of committed children, the sum of $11,759.21 ; 
from the Widows' Pension Bureau we received, towards 
the support of widows and their dependent children, the 
sum of $5,832.84 ; and other sources of income amounted 
to $2,653.09, making a total income of $77,245.14. 

The expenditures exceeded the income by the sum 
of $3,513.80, and this deficit, which is an annual occur- 
rence, to a greater or lesser degree, is the cause of con- 
siderable worriment to your Board of Directors. 

Formerly these deficits were made up by drawing 
upon the reserve funds of our constituent societies. As 
pointed out to you in our last annual report, these funds 
are now entirely exhausted. Fortunately during 1915, 

69 



owing partly to the increased prosperity of our city, due 
to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, labor 
was in demand and there was no reason why any able- 
bodied man or woman should have been unemployed. 
This reduced the average applications for assistance and 
we were therefore enabled to cut down our relief expen- 
ditures, causing us to close the year with the small deficit 
reported. 

Whether the applications for aid made upon us during 
the year we are now entering upon will increase or de- 
crease, remains to be ascertained. As far as we can 
foresee, there is no reason to believe that there will be 
a material reduction in expenditures ; and how to curtail 
them to a point where they will meet our income, and 
at the same time do justice to every demand made upon 
our benefactions, is the problem. 

There seems to be an impression prevalent among the 
members of our community that our organization is 
plentifully supplied with funds, and every case referred 
to us should receive whatever aid is applied for. When 
not given, your Directors receive considerable unde- 
served criticism and censure for having denied such 
relief. 

To these critics we wish to say that aid is given to the 
extent which our means permit. We endeavor to be 
just to all of our applicants, and if worthy, we aid as 
adequately as possible. We have no means of increasing 
our income, as it is against the principles of "Federa- 
tion" for us to solicit extra aid from the community, 
and we are therefore obliged to limit our benefactions 
to as near as possible the allotment granted us by the 
Federation. 

The work of our two most important committees, 
that of the Committee on Pensions and that of the Com- 
mittee on Children's Aid, naturally has not been affected 
by the general prosperity, for the reason that their work 
embraces those who are given fixed allowances for their 
support, due to their being incapacitated through illness, 
old age, or to widows with dependent children. During 
the year, their work embraced the care of 177 such 
cases, 46 being due to old age, 3 to insufficient earnings, 

70 



26 to chronic illness, 25 to tuberculosis, 30 widows, 16 
cases of dependent children and 31 cases in which there 
was no male support. The number of children directly 
under the care of the Children's Auxiliary was 163, and 
the expenditures incurred on behalf of all of these cases 
amounted to $39,579.47. 

It must be remembered that the allowances granted 
these cases can never be sufficiently generous to allow 
any margin over absolutely necessary expenditures, and 
curtailment of them means untold misery. 

Anticipating that the closing of the Exposition would 
throw large numbers of wage earners out of occupation, 
we established, in the fall of 1915, a Committee on 
Employment, consisting of Messrs. M. S. Kohlberg, 
Henry G. Meyer and A. C. Springer, to whom was 
relegated the matter of procuring positions for those 
unemployed as well as for those whose income could 
be increased through a change of occupation. 

These gentlemen are daily at our office and are 
making determined efforts to procure positions for all 
who apply. Their work gives promise of filling a real 
need in our community, and if the subscribers to Fed- 
eration, when in need of help, would encourage their 
efforts by communicating with them, it would greatly 
facilitate their labors. 

The history of our organization has been over- 
shadowed by the lamented death of our honored Presi- 
dent, Mr. Henry Dernham. What he did and what he 
was, we have endeavored to set forth in the resolutions 
adopted at the time of his death. The pain of his 
departure is still too fresh to appreciate how severe is 
the loss to our Society. He gave the best that was in 
him without thought of self, freely placing at the dis- 
posal of our organization his time and experience. His 
place is one that will not soon be filled and the work 
done by him during his incumbency of office will serve 
us as a model. 

To all of our sister organizations with whom we are 
brought in touch by our many-sided activities and from 
whom we have always received every kindness and con- 
sideration, our thanks are due, as well as to the ladies 

71 



serving on our various committees, whose incessant 
labors were called for in ameliorating the condition of 
the poor. 

This concludes a brief resume of what transpired 
during the past year. The character of the work of a 
relief organization differs so markedly from that of an 
institution that in but a few instances can we see the 
net result of our efforts, and it is not possible for us 
to say how far we have benefited those whom we so 
earnestly desire to help. We do know, however, that 
there are families who are not living under proper con- 
ditions, that there are children growing up in close 
proximity to a tubercular member of a family because 
our means do not enable us to properly segregate the 
patient, and that there are numbers of cases where the 
growing ravages of illness can only be checked by 
availing ourselves of all of the means which science has 
placed at our command. 

To do this, however, requires adequate funds, more 
funds than we have at our command, and insofar as we 
are the almoners of the community, whatever funds 
are placed in our hands must be sufficient. When the 
amount is inadequate, the sufferer is not us, but the 
poor whose wants are unrelieved. 

Give us the support that we require and we will 
cheerfully shoulder the responsibility of providing ade- 
quate relief to those unfortunates who are perforce 
obliged to appeal to us for aid. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE 
HEBREW BOARD OF RELIEF. 



72 



HEBREW BOARD OF RELIEF 



Financial Statement 
For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1915 



RECEIPTS 

Federation of Jewish Charities, apportionment for 

1915 $57,000.00 

Charity grants returned by applicants 732.83 

Contributions towards special cases 737.05 

Contributions towards Children's Aid: 
From City and County of San Francisco 
towards support of committed chil- 
dren $11,759.21 

From Widow Pension Bureau 5,832.84 

From parents and relatives 265.50 

17,857.55 

Contributions towards transportation 543.30 

Interest from Treasurer's cash balances 136.41 

Donations 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sinsheimer, com- 
memorating marriage of son, Edgar.. $ 200.00 

Henry Levinson 15.00 

J. G. Megler, Brookfield, Mass 10.00 

North Alaska Salmon Co 10.00 

Mrs. R. Peixotto 3.00 

238.00 

Total receipts $77,245.14 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Charity $70,641.39 

Expense : 

Federation of Jewish Charities, account 

proportion of expenses $ 4,861.41 

Salaries and general expense 5,256.14 

10,117.55 

Total disbursements $80,758.94 

Total disbursements $80,758.94 

Total income 77,245.14 

Deficit $ 3,513.80 

73 



ASSETS 

Cash $11,965.56 

Eureka Benevolent Society, account cash advanced 1,000.00 
Federation of Jewish Charities, due account 1915 
allotment 3,000.00 

Total $15,965.56 

LIABILITIES 

Federation of Jewish Charities, due acct. Expenses. $ 892.07 

Trust Fund 567.22 

Real Estate Loan Fund 146.00 

Capital Account, January 1, 1915 $13,175.30 

Suspense Account, January 1, 1915 4,69*. 77 

$17,874.07 
Less deficit for 1915 3,513.80 

Capital Account, January 1, 1916 14,360.27 

Total $15,965.56 

We beg leave to state that we have examined the 
books and accounts of the Secretary from month to 
month, verified all vouchers and find same correct and in 
perfect order, as also the above financial statement. 

Respectfully, 

Simon Anspacher, 
slgmund schwabacher, 
Auditing Committee. 
San Francisco, March 20, 1916. 



74 



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Table No. 2 

STATISTICAL LIST OF CASES 

Number of new cases — 

Resident 314 

Transient 541 

855 

Number of recurrent cases — 

Resident 790 

Transient 87 

877 

Total number of cases aided 1,732 

Number of families aided — 

Resident recurrent 549 

Transient recurrent 40 

Resident new 184 

Transient new 124 

897 

Number of single persons aided — 

Resident recurrent 241 

Transient recurrent 47 

Resident new 130 

Transient new 417 

835 

Number of persons in families 3,745 

Number of new pension cases 44 

Number of recurrent pension cases 133 

Total number of pension cases 177 

Number of consumptive cases — 

Resident recurrent 96 

Resident new 9 

Transient recurrent 14 

Transient new 3 

122 

Number of cases aided with transportation 46 

Number of persons aided with transportation 71 

Number of maternity cases attended. . . 86 

Number of free interments 45 

7fi 



Table No. 3 
NATIVITY OF APPLICANTS 

Algeria 1 

Austrian Empire 247 

Belgium 1 

British Empire . . 51 

Central America 2 

Finland 1 

France 16 

Germany 156 

Holland 6 

Italy 1 

Ottoman Empire 24 

Portugal 2 

Roumania 123 

Russia 841 

Sweden 2 

Switzerland 4 

United States 254 



SOCIAL STATE 



1,732 



Married 612 

Widows (single) 69 

Widows with families 114 

Deserted wives 17 

Widowers (single) 26 

Widowers with families 19 

Divorced (single) 10 

Divorced with families 13 

Detached men 131 

Married, childless 124 

Single 597 



1,732 
Table No. 4 

LENGTH OF RESIDENCE IN COUNTRY AND CITY 

United San 

States Francisco 

One year and under 59 541 

From 1 to 2 years 60 151 

From 2 to 3 years 46 125 

From 3 to 5 years 88 196 

From 5 to 10 years 365 329 

Over 10 years 1,114 390 

1,732 1,732 

77 



CAUSE OF DISTRESS 

Out of employment 435 

Old age 69 

Insufficient earnings 110 

Sickness 725 

No male support 137 

Legal aid 21 

Imprisonment 8 

Investigations , 85 

Shiftlessness 13 

Transportation 134 

1,732 



78 



Statements 



OF 



CONSTITUENT 
SOCIETIES 



OF 



HEBREW BOARD OF RELIEF 



7i> 



EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 

Organized October 2, 1850 

Incorporated March 29, 1851. Re-incorporated April 9, 1907 

Business Office— 436 O'Farrell Street 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1916 
Officers 

Simon Anspacher, President 
Sigmund Schwabacher, Vice -President 
Abraham Haas, Treasurer 
Meyer H. Levy, Secretary 

Directors 

Frederick Baruch Morgan A. Gunst 

Abraham Haas Albert Meyer 

Joel K. Hecht Otto Irving Wise 

Samuel W. Heller Samuel I. Wormser 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Year Ending December 31, 1915 

A— GKNKRAIv FUND 
Income — 

Donations and bequests $ 500.00 

No Expenditures 

Capital account January 1, 1915 $11,138.05 

Capital account January 1, 1916 11,638.05 



80 



B— WIDOW AND ORPHAN FUND 

Income — 

Interest $ 7,025.51 

Profit on sale of bonds 3,600.00 

Donations 37.50 

$ 10,663.01 
Expenditures — 

Dispensation to widows $5,040.00 

Expense 54.10 

5,094.10 

$ 5,568.91 
Less depreciation on bonds written off 4,546.25 

Net gain $ 1,022.66 

Capital account January 1, 1915 $146,844.24 

Capital account January 1, 1916 147,866.90 

Donations and Bequests Received- 
Bequest of Rebecca Schweitzer $ 500.00 

Donation from J. Barth & Co 12.50 

Donation from Carl Raiss & Co 25.00 



81 



FIRST HEBREW BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 

Organized 1851 
Business Office — 436 O'Farrell Street 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1915 

Officers 

A. Aronson, President 
Mark Green, Treasurer 
Meyer H. Levy, Secretary 

Directors 

M. Samuel Edmund Tauszky 

Gustav Schnee Otto Irving Wise 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Year Ending December Zl t 1915 

Income — 

Interest $ 305.18 

Bequests 100.00 

Total $ 405.18 

Expenditures — 

Expense 4.00 

Excess income over expenditures .$ 401.18 

Capital account January 1, 1915 7,941.20 

Capital account January 1, 1916 8,342.38 



82 



JEWISH LADIES' RELIEF SOCIETY 

Incorporated June 27, 1876 
Business Office — 436 O'Farrell Street 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1916 

Officers 

Mrs. Maurice Schweitzer, President 
Mrs. Louis Goodman, Vice-President 
Meyer H. Levy, Secretary 

Directors 

Mrs. Benjamin Arnhold Mrs. F. A. Haber 

Mrs. Henry Dernham Mrs. Hugo Rothschild 

Mrs. Joseph Ehrman Mrs. Henry Sinsheimer 

Mrs. Nellie Salberg 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Year Ending December 31, 1915 
Income — 

Interest $ 24.06 

No Expenditures 

Capital account January 1, 1915 $821.78 

Capital account January 1, 1916 845.84 



83 



ijtfbmu Ifflm? for Ag^i StsabbJn 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1916 

Officers 

Samuel Polack, President 
Joseph Hyman, Vice-President 
Miss Amelia Levy, Secretary 
Isaac Moss, Treasurer 

Directors 

Albert M. Bender Mrs. B. Schapiro 

Emile E. Kahn Louis A. Schwabacher 

Emile Levy 



COMMITTEES 

Executive Committee 

Joseph Hyman, Chairman 
Louis A. Schwabacher Emile Levy 

House Committee 

Emile Levy, Chairman 
Miss Amelia Levy Mrs. B. Schapiro 

Isaac Moss Louis A. Schwabacher 

Building Committee 

Joseph Hyman, Chairman 
Albert M. Bender Emile Levy 

Emile E. Kahn Isaac Moss 

Louis A. Schwabacher 

Finance Committee 

Emile E. Kahn, Chairman 
Albert M. Bender Emile Levy 

Louis A. Schwabacher 



84 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



To the Board of Directors and Members of 
Hebrezv Home for Aged Disabled. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : 

In bidding you welcome to this the twenty-seventh 
annual meeting of our corporation, I have occasion to 
offer fervent thanksgiving to the Almighty for His 
mercy in granting me the favor that, notwithstanding I 
am over 80 years of age and suffering from physical 
disability, I am enabled to read to you, for the twenty- 
fourth time, my report as President of this charity, as 
also for His favor to report to you that my prediction 
of a year ago, when I informed you that Hon. Thos. F. 
Graham has reaffirmed his judgment in our favor against 
all claimants in the Julius Friedman Estate matter and 
denied them a new trial, as also a change of venue. 
The Kagan claimants appealed from this decision to the 
Supreme Court of this State. I added that we may rea- 
sonably expect a favorable decision from said Court in 
the Fair year 1915, and now I am happy to inform you 
that my prediction was verified, for on December 13th 
last, the Supreme Court, in a very elaborate decision 
written by Hon. Justice Henshaw, in which all of the 
seven Justices concurred, sustained the judgment of 
Hon. Judge Graham in refusing a new trial, as also to 
grant a change of venue, and quoting also, at length, 
some of the remarks and hints directed by Hon. Judge 
Graham to one of the executors of the estate and his 
attorney, which the Court sustained as being proper 
and proved neither bias nor prejudice by Judge Graham. 
I will quote a remark of Judge Graham's which is re- 
peated in the decision of the Supreme Justices : "I hope 
the aged Hebrews will have a chance to use some of 
this money within a short time/' to which Judge Slack 

85 



answered: "We appreciate your Honor's position." 

Of course, it will require some more Court proceed- 
ings before we will reap our harvest. We must indeed 
be thankful to our honorable attorney, Judge Chas. W. 
Slack, for the very exhaustive brief filed by him in 
answer to the one filed in the Supreme Court by the 
attorneys of the Kagan claimants, who, to strengthen 
their position, secured the assistance of the renowned 
law firm of Sullivan, Sullivan & Roche. 

I much regret, however, that our original attorney, 
Wallace A. Wise, who up to twenty-one months ago 
was associated with Judge Slack, has not survived this 
decision. 

During the year we admitted as inmates: Miss R. 
Harris, a native of Prussia; Mr. Julius Rosenberg, a 
native of Germany; Mr. Abraham Ruby, a native of 
Poland; Mr. Peter Ellis Poznasky, a native of Holland; 
Mr. Goodman Ginsberg, a native of California, and Mr. 
Benjamin Friedman, a native of Russia; in all, six. 

Called to their permanent rest were Mr. Samuel 
Anixter, Mr. Levi Kaplan, Mr. Abraham Jackson, Mr. 
L. B. Frank, Mr. Jacob Caleb Marks, Mrs. Gittel Gold- 
farb and Mrs. Mollie Hipps. Voluntarily left the Home : 
Mrs. H. Loryea and Mr. Isidore Leszynsky. Removed 
from the Home were Mr. Joseph W. Goldstein and 
Mr. Emanuel Klein. The latter, however, on demand 
of Dr. Weiss, who never sanctioned his removal from 
the Home, was ordered reinstated by the Board of 
Directors. Consequently, we lost ten inmates and only 
admitted six. We had at the close of the year only 
twenty-three, against twenty-seven inmates a year ago. 
By way of remark, I might state that since, two inmates 
were admitted and some more are under consideration 
by the Committee on Investigation. 

I can only repeat my recommendation that you in- 
struct the incoming Board of Directors to render our 
honorable physician, Dr. E. M. Weiss, a token of appre- 
ciation of the respect in which he is held by our mem- 
bers. I am sorry, however, at being compelled to state 
that I deeply deplore that his instructions regarding 
treatment of inmates who are under his care are not 

86 



always carried out or are misconstrued by the manage- 
ment, which is still under the control of Mr. F. M 
Gladstone as Superintendent and Mrs. Gladstone as 
Matron. 

From the report of the Secretary, you will learn the 
details of the receipts and disbursements of the year, on 
which I will not elaborate as I usually did, as the re- 
ceipts are satisfactory. 

I desire to express my appreciation to Mrs. S. J. 
Mitchell and Mrs. Sam Meyer for their kind response 
to Mrs. Gladstone's request to call and assist in sewing 
whenever needed. 

I must not fail to publicly thank, in the names of our 
inmates, Mr. I. W. Hellman, Jr., for the treat he gave 
them in furnishing a sufficient number of automobiles 
to take them to the Exposition and there providing all 
facilities to inspect the different exhibits. 

I desire also to thank Mrs. B. Shapiro and other 
ladies, as also the members of the Committee of Fifty 
of the I. O. B. B., for entertainments given our inmates 
at the Home. 

We are also under obligation to Rev. Dr. Herman 
Rosenwasser for officiating at several funerals of in- 
mates. 

Considering the nearness of coming into possession 
of the inheritance bequeathed to this charity by the 
philanthropist, Julius Friedman, deceased, I refrain from 
making any recommendations. 

To my colleagues on the Board of Directors I express 
my gratitude for their able assistance given me, and 
praying that the Almighty, who from the very beginning 
guarded the welfare of this charity, will further con- 
tinue to do so and protect us from all who desire to take 
hold of its control while keeping in the distance when 
it was in needy circumstances. 

I thank you for your attention and remain respectfully 
submitting this report. 

Samuel Polack, 

President. 



87 



SECRETARY'S REPORT 



To the President, Officers and Members of the 
Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled: 

In compliance with the laws of this Society, I here- 
with submit my annual report for the fiscal year 1915. 

FINANCIAL 

We have received during the year: 
From Donations 

Mr. Henry Myers $ 10.00 

Mr. Isidor Leszynsky 75.00 

Mrs. Dorothea Shirek 10.00 

Mr. Samuel Polack 27.50 

Mrs. W. W. Stettheimer and Mrs. C. R. Walter,. 25.00 

Mrs. Johanna Getz 30.00 

Mr. Albert M. Bender 42.00 

Mrs. A. T. De Lee 25.00 

Mr. B. M. Jackson 40.00 

Bequest of Charles G. Lathrop 1,000.00 

From Other Sources 

Interest 286.25 

Sale of bond 1,891.70 

Membership dues 645.25 

Sundries 125.65 

Federation of Jewish Charities 8,630.20 

Total receipts $12,863.55 

EXPENDITURES 

Fruits and vegetables $ 158.00 

Meat, fish, poultry 1,113.70 

Groceries, liquor, tobacco 1,610.41 

Telephone 84.75 

Laundry 346.60 

Interments 341.20 

Salaries 2,531.45 

Provisions 813.11 

Medicines 134.10 

Fuel 301.60 

Light, gas 183.75 

Water 237.29 

Supplies 526.00 

Printing 13.25 

Taxes 558.39 

Insurance 225.00 

$ 9,178.60 

88 



ACCOUNT WITH TREASURER 

January 1, 1915: 

On hand in bank $ 92.40 

On hand with Superintendent 300.00 

Receipts with Superintendent 12,863.55 

$13,255.95 
Disbursements, 1915 9,178.60 

$ 4,077.35 
Less due Treasurer, January 1, 1915 496.90 

Cash on hand January 1, 1916 $ 3,580.45 

Distributed as follows: 
With Union Trust Co., Savings Acct. .. .$2,000.00 

With Union Trust Co., Comcl. Acct 1,280.45 

With Superintendent 300.00 

3,580.45 

Investments 

5 Market Street Railway Bonds. 

Realty 

Lot on Lombard Street, 50x87.6. 

Lot and improvements, 2504 Howard Street. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. Levy, 
Secretary. 



89 



Emamt-iEi BxBttx^ttnb 

Incorporated January 4, 1902 

Location — 1057 Steiner Street 

Dormitory Annex — 1402 Golden Gate Avenue 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1916 
Officers 

Mrs. Matilda Esberg, President 

Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld, First Vice-President 

Mrs. Rosalie Kaufman, Second Vice-President 

Mrs. J. W. Steinhart, Third Vice-President 

Mrs. Joseph Ehrman, Treasurer 

Mrs. M. C. Sloss, Recording Secretary 

Miss Jeanette Pauson, Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. I. S. Ackerman, Auditor 

Directors 

Mrs. F. A. Haber Mrs. J. W. Lilienthal 

Mrs. Helen Hecht Mrs. Martin A. Meyer 

Mrs. H. U. Brandenstein Mrs. J. H. Neustadter 

Mrs. A. L. Brown Mrs. Herbert Rothchild 

Mrs. J. R. Davidson Mrs. Charles Schlessinger 

Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. M. Salz 

Mrs. S. W. Heller Mrs. Joseph Sloss 

Mrs. S. S. Kahn Mrs. Sigmund Stern 

Mrs. M. S. Koshland Mrs. Ernest M. Sultan 

Mrs. J. B. Levison Mrs. I. N. Walter 

Mrs. Milton Levi Mrs. Samuel I. Wormser 

Honorary Vice-Presidents 

Mrs. Clara Baum Mrs. I. Lowenberg 

Mrs. Lewis Gerstle Mrs. J. Voorsanger 

Mrs. L. P. Wiel 

Advisory Board 

Mr. Isaiah Choynski Mr. I. W. Hellman, Jr. 

Mr. Milton H. Esberg Mr. E. R. Lilienthal 

Mr. J. S. Friedlander Rev. Dr. Martin A. Meyer 

Mr. Morgan A. Gunst Mr. J. M. Rothchild 

Mr. Leon Sloss 

Resident Head Worker 

Miss Ethel R. Eeineman 



90 



Assistant Worker 

Mrs. P. Ruhland 

Club Director 

Miss Anita Toor 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Year Ending December 31, 1915 

INCOME— 

From Federation of Jewish Charities $5,062.70 

From other sources 783.14 

$5,845.84 
EXPENDITURES 5,423.58 

Excess income over expenditures $ 422.26 



91 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



To the Directors, Advisory Board and Friends 
of the Emanu-El Sisterhood: 

Eastward bound, my thoughts turn to the West, and 
in these hours of leisure, I will try to review last year's 
activities and send you in a very short report, my im- 
pression of the most perceptible results, and I am sure 
you will all agree with me that we have been successful 
in our undertakings and have at last realized some of 
our most ardent desires. We can safely admit that we 
have advanced considerably, and the word "philan- 
thropy" was defined in its broadest sense and persist- 
ently employed to better conditions for many brought 
to our notice. 

Our technical class work is now very well system- 
atized and has reached a high standard that bears close 
inspection in many branches, due in great part to the 
efficient teachers, Miss Wiener and Miss Toor. 

The children's attitude to their guides and teachers, 
their desire to take active part in all the classes, their 
regular attendance in large numbers, are a proof of the 
usefulness of the Emanu-El Sisterhood, and we look 
forward with confidence to the realization of many 
visions, in the near future. The social worker is always 
creating plans, and with new work, new wants arise; 
so with thoughtful observation and painstaking practice 
one must go forward and apply gained experience suc- 
cessfully. 

There have been many changes in the personnel and 
regime from 1915 to 1916. Miss Haber, whose stay 
with us was curtailed by her return to private life, 
started and placed many things on a solid basis and we 
remember with pleasure and gratitude how much her 
energy changed. 

The Directors one and all show a gratifying interest 

92 



in the work, and surely they will continue to, yea, 
possibly increase their personal support, which is ever 
needed and which will be a great stimulus to our new 
Resident Directress, Miss Feineman, whose love for the 
work inspires all that are brought in contact with her; 
and in the short space of time she is with us, she has 
gained our complete confidence and esteem, and the 
love and affection of the many residents now in our 
Home. In her report she will give you full details of 
the number of girls now with us, of the classes, how 
the house and Home are conducted, and she will also 
bring to you many suggestions for the next year. The 
plans we started last year have been retarded ; the tur- 
bulence abroad, the social unrest at home, made it neces- 
sary to defer the building, we hope soon to acquire and 
which we need, until matters are more settled and we 
have more funds to proceed with. In the meantime, we 
have rented another small house in the immediate 
vicinity to accommodate the ever-increasing demand for 
living in our Home for the Jewish orphan and homeless 
working girl. A very happy spirit pervades therein; 
may it continue. 

Our Treasurer's report will show the status quo of 
our financial standing, representing principally our 
building fund ; the interest we are obliged to use to add 
to the appropriation sent us from the Federation, which 
we receive regularly; and we hope when their member- 
ship and donations increase, our allotment will be 
larger, as the scope of our work may demand. 

It is with sincere regrets I must chronicle the demise 
of our beloved First Vice-President, Mrs. Joseph Roth- 
child. Her interest in this institution was manifested 
almost up to her last days on earth and her memory 
will ever be dear to us. 

To the Board of Directors, my sincerest thanks for 
their steady attendance at all called meetings and in- 
creased interest in all the sections and wherever needed. 
It is always a pleasure to aid, confer and advise one 
another, where the entente cordiale exists. Sincere 
thanks to the faithful guides and teachers; thanks to 

93 



all the kind friends, too numerous to enumerate, who 
have so often contributed materially in many ways and 
on different occasions. Stay with us, friends, and en- 
courage others to join you; remember our aim for the 
future, as it ever has been in the past, that the Emanu-El 
Sisterhood be a lasting monument to its founders, an 
institution recognized in the community for efficient 
work and progress, then will the harvest be bountiful 
and we all will rejoice. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Matilda Esberg, 

President. 

New York, April 19, 1916. 



94 



HEAD WORKER AND RESIDENT WORKER'S 
REPORT 



To the President, Directors, Members and 
Friends of the Emanu-El Sisterhood: 

It is my privilege to stand before you at this first 
annual meeting held since I have come to work among 
you, and to give you a resume of the work done and 
the hopes held by all of us. 

The realization of this privilege at once overwhelms 
and inspires me. To attempt such a report so shortly 
after my assuming charge, particularly before a group 
who have devoted years rather than months to this 
special organization and who have mothered and fos- 
tered it from its very inception, is little less than appal- 
ling. Most of you here — and several not able to be 
present today — have laid the very foundation stones 
and have long since removed the debris and scaffolding 
of the structure which you are now asking me to build 
up and readjust to modern social needs. It is this which 
is inspiring. It is no task to tear down and to build 
anew with unused tools and fresh material ; but to recon- 
struct and rehabilitate : to preserve and retain only that 
of the old which is of permanent value and of larger 
usefulness in the new order of things, and to rear a 
modern, permanent structure out of the traditions of 
the past to meet and to withstand the exigencies of the 
future — this is an undertaking of which you San Fran- 
ciscans, above all peoples, know the bitter-sweet expe- 
rience, and in which, in consequence, you, of all others, 
can the most keenly sympathize and co-operate. That 
I have been called here to help plan and direct these 
reconstructive measures ; to aid you in your worthy 
desire to fit the Emanu-El Sisterhood into the new social 
scheme and to bring it in line with the new social forces 
which the most conservative recognize to be constantly 

95 



changing and impelling — to me, this is a service con- 
secrated in its nature and stimulating and delightful in 
its furtherance. 

Realizing that the majority of you are in personal 
contact with or have intimate knowledge of the work 
which we are today reviewing, or have been kept so 
by our monthly reports thereof, I feel it unwise to give 
too detailed a recapitulation. There are, however, 
others not so familiar with the scheme and scope, the 
work and hopes of the Sisterhood under its revised 
schedule, and it is for them that I ask your patience for 
a superficial outline. 

Primarily the Emanu-El Sisterhood for Personal 
Service maintains and has maintained for several years, 
a Boarding Home for Jewish Working Girls, who, self- 
supporting and self-respecting, need the vitalizing, hu- 
manizing influence of home surroundings and family 
affection, which, rather than their delinquence or de- 
pendency, is their reason d'etre for application and 
admission. Girls graduating from the Orphanage, 
others temporarily or permanently separated from their 
families in other cities, still others seeking employment 
or health in California and having no near relatives to 
whom to go, constitute the majority of our resident girls 
at present. 

This is in no sense a House of Refuge for wayward, 
wilful girls, or for parents or relatives desiring to shift 
their responsibilities. It is a home in its highest sense — 
the only one of its kind in the city — for the Homeless 
Jewish Working Girl, be she de- or in-dependent, so 
far as funds or watchful guidance are concerned. This 
is emphasized because of questions emanating from both 
workers and applicants, and because a certain vital 
something will be lost if the idea becomes prevalent that 
ours is an institution of either charitable or correctional 
aspect. 

For two in a room, breakfast and dinner at home, and 
lunches carried to work, the girls pay $3.00, $3.50 and 
$4.00 per week, dependent upon their earning capacity. 
For single rooms, those girls earning between $40 and 
$60 a month pay $5.00 per week, in all gradations of 

96 



which, laundry and ironing privileges are at present 
included, where the girl has to do same for herself. The 
few rules enforced are clearly explained and understood 
from the first, so that the girls realize the wisdom 
rather than the hardship thereof, and a spirit of co- 
operation and family unity is daily being strengthened 
and enjoyed. The closing hour of 10:30 week nights 
and 11 :30 Saturday and Sunday nights, applies only 
to girls of 18 and under, the elder ones being allowed 
keys, a privilege which has not only been not once 
abused, but an unasked account of the evening and the 
escort has also been invariably forthcoming in a spirit 
of happy confidence far more worth while than were it 
compulsory. 

The men friends of the girls are extended a warm 
welcome upon every and in fact no occasion, and the 
innovation of seeing many of our girls who formerly 
depended upon the street corner or dance hall or movie 
as a meeting place, now remaining home to be called 
for or to entertain their friends, is one of the most 
gratifying of any factors in recent months. Night after 
night, when the classes, lectures, or parties do not inter- 
fere, or even when the former are being held, the library, 
beau parlor, sometimes the dining room — and now the 
sitting room in the cottage opposite, are really worked 
overtime in the happy feeling which the girls have in 
being able to entertain in their own home, and of having 
one or the other of us to extend greeting and hospitality. 
If this means anything whatsoever to the girls and 
their friends, it is of even deeper significance to your 
Head Worker. For thus a hold and an insight unob- 
tainable through any other means can be retained and a 
beautiful spirit of trust, mutual confidence and com- 
radeship is inspired and strengthened for all of us. 

Crowded quarters and a waiting list demanded an 
annex dormitory, which was opened three weeks ago 
in a cozy little cottage just across the street, which, 
entirely repainted, decorated, and furnished under the 
personal supervision of an untiring, efficient as well as 
artistic House Committee, is now the joy and pride of 
all of us. Equipped to accommodate eight residents 

97 



immediately, and ten or more in emergency, it answers 
our every wish and need of model housekeeping. Mrs. 
Ruhland, my competent and devoted assistant, who well 
understands Girl Psychology, and who helps me over 
the petty as well as larger concerns of the day, is in 
charge of the cottage, and she, as well as the girls, 
breakfasts there, but dines here in the main building, 
where all are under my supervision and where all 
activities are centered. Although the little cottage is 
our most recent addition and venture, I purposely men- 
tion it first, because I feel keenly that its very existence 
constitutes a big stepping stone; because it has already 
justified its expense not alone through its self-supporting 
returns, but principally through the changed attitudes 
of the girls residing there, and the sense of pride, 
ownership and responsibility which the artistic but sim- 
ple surroundings inspire. And right here may I be 
pardoned in saying that the time has long since passed, 
I know all of us agree, when "any old thing" will do 
for the furnishings of an institution, any more than 
any old person will do to conduct it. We have proved, 
even in our old building, which daily becomes more 
difficult to keep clean and attractive, and to create a 
pride in so keeping, that a few pretty new cretonnes 
and hand-made scrim-drapes are far more efficacious in 
a cleaning-up process than mere lectures or scoldings; 
and that no better object lesson could be given than the 
simple, perfect taste of the new little house just oppo- 
site, which serves as an inspiration to all, to be emulated 
by all. 

That the cottage at present is not filled, is not dis- 
concerting. In fact, it would be sad if in three weeks 
we had reached the maximum which made necessary 
the addition. There are at present twenty of us, three 
girls having left just recently for the East, a fourth 
returning to her parents in the city and a fifth having 
to be sent to the country for her health. Three other 
girls whose applications were filed, have had to delay 
their coming because of personal or family illness. As 
to the financial side, you have received full reports from 
your Secretary and Treasurer. In passing, however, I 

98 



wish to state that the cottage is entirely self-supporting, 
including rent, water, light, etc., exclusive, of course, of 
the new furnishings, generous checks for which were 
gratefully received ; and that our larger house has called 
upon the Sisterhood Board, as in the past, only for rent 
and salaries, which, in time it is hoped, may also be 
covered by the money received from the girls. 

A very great factor in effecting systematic manage- 
ment and elimination of waste is the installation of a 
bookkeeping and requisition system patterned after that 
used at the Orphanage, which is to be adopted, I 
believe, by all similar local organizations. For the 
suggestion, actual assistance and painstaking effort in 
this installation, too much appreciation cannot be ex- 
pressed to Dr. Langer, whose expert advice and inter- 
ested co-operation have been as generously given as 
they are deeply valued. 

Now, to a superficial outline of the work undertaken 
and accomplished by the Emanu-El Sisterhood, which, 
though now but in its reborn infancy, is growing with 
such rapidity and strength that it is a source of deepest 
gratification to all of us. Other agencies doing larger 
work and other workers of longer and deeper experience 
in local affairs, are recognizing us as potent factors for 
good and for growth, and are lending a hand in a co- 
operative, generous spirit of cameradie that is at once 
both suggestive and enlightening. That this hearty wel- 
come and encouraging confidence and support have 
been extended by others as well as yourselves, by civic 
and non-sectarian leaders and organizations, tends to 
spur your Head Worker to deeds and hopes worthy of 
the trust given and to make her pray humbly to merit, 
to retain and to strengthen the initial overtures and 
friendships. 

That our clubs and classes are in such flourishing 
condition and that the work is becoming more stand- 
ardized and efficient is due more to that same fine spirit 
of response and co-operation of teachers and workers 
and directors, than to any individual leadership. There 
are a certain inexplicable enthusiasm and joy in the 
work which are immediately apparent and which radiate 

99 



their happy results. Through several Workers' Meet- 
ings held here, there has been brought about an atmos- 
phere of get-together-ness, which is stimulating not 
alone to all of us working so devotedly for the cause, 
but which also finds its response in the attitude of all 
coming to the Sisterhood for guidance or instruction. 
Because of the enlarged activities, it was found neces- 
sary to engage a Club Director, who, in the person of 
Miss Anita Toor, is personally responsible for the 
Dramatic Class, the English Classes, the Story Hour 
during the winter, and also the supervision of the Tues- 
day Sewing Classes. Miss Toor is giving eminent satis- 
faction in these special branches, and through her studies 
at the University of California in conjunction with her 
class work here, is continuing her training for most 
efficient Social Service. 

The classes now being conducted and the schedule 
and enrollment of each (list of teachers will be found 
elsewhere) are as follows: (Membership dues, which are 
five cents per pupil per month, for each class, no child 
being permitted to belong to more than three classes a 
week so as not to interfere with school, home, or recre- 
ational hours.) 

Schedule for Clubs and Classes 

Monday 

3 :00-4 :30 Millinery Class 

3 :45-5 :00 Dramatic Class 

7:30-9:00 English Class 

7 :30-9 :30 Stenography-Typewriting 

Tuesday 

3 :00-4 :30 Sewing and Dressmaking Classes. 

8 :00-9 :00 Folk Dancing 

Wednesday 

1 :30-3 :00 English Class for Mothers 

2 :30-4 :00 Story Hour and Play Club 
2:30-4:30 Mothers' Club 

3 :00-4 :30 Embroidery and Darning Class 

100 



3:45-5:00 Boys' Gymnasium Club, 149 Eddy, Miss 

Levy 
7:30-8:30 Blue Bird Club 
8:00-9:00 Bi-Monthly Hygiene, Prophylactic and 

Salesmanship Talks 

Thursday 

3:00-4:30 Crochet Class 

4:15-5:15 Folk Dancing 

7 :30-9 :00 English 

7 :30-9 :30 Stenography-Typewriting Class 

Friday 

3:00- 4:30 Sewing Classes 

6 :30 Service 
8:30-11:00 Social Evening 

Sunday 

8:15-11:00 Concerts, Lectures, Open Forum, Neigh- 
borhood and Parents' Nights 

Just a word or two in reference to the foregoing. 
The Mothers' Club, under the indefatigable leader- 
ship of Mrs. F. A. Haber, continues as one of the 
traditions of the past which we wish to retain as a 
heritage of the old days, to be augmented later on by 
a younger Mothers' or Brides' Club, recruited from 
our alumnae, before whom we intend to do construc- 
tive work by means of lectures, stereopticans, con- 
ferences, etc. 

The Stenography and Typewriting Classes, under 
Mrs. Weinburg's and Miss Levin's splendid instruc- 
tion, are getting actual working results. Only girls 
over 16 years of age are now admitted, and through 
their training here and also through the efforts of 
our Employment Committee, many of these and 
other girls have been placed in remunerative posi- 
tions. Still others out of employment because they 
were unemployable, are now being taught trades and 
professions, tuition for which (and in one case actual 
board) is being paid out of the scholarship fund. 

101 



The excellence of the work done in the Sewing and 
Dressmaking Classes, a small exhibit of which you will 
find in the next room in conjunction with that of the 
Mothers' Club, is due not alone to the volunteer teach- 
ers, who give so generously of their time and ability, but 
also to Miss Grace Weiner, who inaugurated the pres- 
ent system and whose guidance and conscientious sur- 
veillance have done wonders in standardizing and unify- 
ing the work. That the exhibit is small, is due to two 
causes : one that our time was too short for preparation ; 
the other, that I asked the children to make something 
for Passover or Easter (for it will be remembered that 
our clubs and classes are non-sectarian) as a gift to 
some one they love. These gifts they sewed or em- 
broidered or crocheted in their individual classes only 
during the last half-hour of each session, so as not to 
interfere with their regular work. Thus their instruc- 
tions were put to practical test in the making of gar- 
ments of their own choosing, and a beautiful spirit of 
giving rather than receiving was inculcated. An entire 
set of dress, apron, and dust-cap, made for their mother 
by three little sisters of thirteen, eleven and seven years, 
respectively; also many pairs of slippers and hug-me- 
tights made for invalids and grandmothers, are not on 
exhibit because they served their higher and truer pur- 
pose of being given and being worn on the special 
occasion for which they were designed, and could not 
be borrowed even temporarily! From the Millinery 
Class, also, under the excellent and conscientious instruc- 
tion of Miss Harold, the girls are enabled to make and 
trim their own hats and to complete a costume of well- 
made garments, sewed, embroidered and constructed 
entirely from their instruction received in the various 
classes. 

It is a physical and mental impossibility, as well as 
an encroachment upon your time and patience, to attempt 
to tell you of the many other interesting side-lights of 
our daily and nightly activities. After all, the real value 
is neither in numbers nor in wordy phrase. Ours are, 
at present, small beginnings, but they are worth-while 
beginnings, and a nucleus and a foundation are being 

102 



formed which are potentially fine and productively 
promising. 

Upon our Friday Evenings-at-Home, I sincerely be- 
lieve I need not elaborate. These have become such a 
part and purpose of the neighborhood, in fact, of the 
community as well as of our Resident Girls, that to 
describe them seems almost to label and lessen them. 
In case there may still be some who are not in touch, 
these social evenings are begun with a home religious 
service at the table, to which we have had many guests, 
whose presence and personality mean much to us, and 
which are followed alternately by a concert, entertain- 
ment, lecture or open forum such as that held last 
Friday evening by Mary Antin before the joint Sister- 
hood, Y. M. and Y. W. H. A. groups. These are given 
by and from the very best talent in the city, which suc- 
ceeding hostesses or the friends of the girls provide, and 
which always conclude with a dance, when the boy and 
men friends predominate. These evenings have become 
nothing short of epochal and have proved not alone of 
a decidedly cultural and broadening influence to us, but 
have also blessed those who came and gave, as well as 
those who received and enjoyed. 

Although the Kiddush is so far the only real religious 
ceremony introduced — religious classes being held in a 
neighboring synagogue — we lose no opportunity to cele- 
brate for our Resident Girls and for the children, every 
great religious holiday, such as Hannuka, Purim and 
Pesach. For the two first named occasions, generous 
treats and parties were provided and enjoyed, particu- 
larly worthy of mention being that of a Hannuka play 
of Dr. Meyer's Religious School, when 175 of our chil- 
dren were guests at the Alcazar Theater, and individual 
boxes of candy were given by one of our members. 
On Purim, our girls were guests of the Y. M. H. A. 
at a Purim masquerade. On the second night of Pass- 
over, we gave a very beautiful Sedar, conducted by 
Rabbi Nieto, at which 32 were present, guests being 
limited to relatives and friends of the Resident Girls 
and to a few others, who, having no home or Sedar 
service of their own, enjoyed the hominess of ours. A 

103 



flashlight picture, which includes Mary Antin and Miss 
Ashe, our honored guests, was taken. 

In the same breath must be mentioned the Neighbor- 
hood Nights held the last Sunday evening of each 
month. These were inaugurated by Mrs. Frances Toor 
Weinburg, whose indefatigable work and discernment 
in meeting and knowing the neighborhood in their 
homes, have helped much in creating a spirit of neigh- 
borly friendliness with the Sisterhood. On Sunday 
evening last, April 23d, over 100 fathers, mothers, and 
relatives of the Dramatic Class and Blue Bird Club 
crowded into our improvised theater to witness the 
girls' first little play, given upon an equally improvised 
stage arranged in our library, under the direction of 
Miss Toor. Encouraging as is the response of these 
Neighborhood Nights, and eager as I am to popularize 
the Sisterhood in this respect, I am very conscious of 
the danger of such intrusion at present, and with our 
very limited quarters, upon the privacy of our home. 
Just how we are to meet this problem, we are going to 
decide in the fall, when, with the granting to us of the 
Golden Gate School as a Social Center — delay of which 
has been caused by lack of lighting equipment, which 
Mr. De Groot promises us positively during vacation — 
we can arrive at a working solution. In the interim, it 
is my intention to work up a very intensive and exten- 
sive personal census and survey of our neighborhood, 
in the assistance of which any one interested and un- 
flagging is invited. We are also going to undertake an 
experiment in which several have oflfered support, but 
which many predict a failure, namely, the continuance 
during the summer vacation of the various clubs and 
classes. If this has proved successful in the East where 
longer vacation terms and greater heat prevail, why 
should we attempt it with qualms, here in glorious 
California, where neither summer nor winter reach 
climatic crises, and where morning instead of afternoon 
instruction, with much time for recreation and play, will 
bridge over that period of inhibition and leisure of the 
vacationist, which, to the child particularly, often be- 
comes dangerous, leading, as is everywhere acknowl- 

104 



edged, to juvenile crime and delinquency? We can but 
make the attempt. 

It is customary to conclude such a report as this with 
a plan of work and a series of suggestions for future 
activities. Let us do, rather than dream, and let our 
work and deeds testify thereto ! Permit me, instead, to 
close with an earnest appeal, not for funds, but for 
that which prepares for and justifies the giving of 
money. 

There is not one of us, I feel safe in asserting, who 
has not been roused in recent years, or perhaps even 
months, to that state of open-mindedness and responsi- 
bility which is generally termed social consciousness ; 
to the realization that each of us is our brother's keeper 
and that there is a tremendous happiness in the reali- 
zation and application thereof; that there is something 
higher and healthier in our dealings with the less for- 
tunate than mere alms-giving or pension-allotments, and 
that in constructive and reconstructive philanthropy we 
must dispense with antiquated measures of relief even 
as we replace outworn machinery and obsolete methods. 
There is and perhaps always will be a percentage of 
men and women who, in Dr. Devine's phrasing, "believe 
it meet and proper to maintain a class of deserving (or 
undeserving?) poor on whom to lavish our bounty." 
But the majority of you, perhaps more slowly in the 
West than in the East, but no less surely, have come 
to that stage where you demand that the same system- 
atic management and efficient administration and trained 
leadership and paid workers shall be installed in your 
philanthropies as have long existed in your businesses; 
that it is not only more effectual and economical, but 
it is also ethical and just to devote time and thought 
and training to those agencies which deal with human 
beings and which prepare for parenthood and citizenship. 
And right here may I emphasize that this Home for 
Jewish Working Girls fulfils its greatest obligation and 
is worthy your noblest support only when based upon 
a perfect understanding on all sides. Unlike settlements 
or educational centers or clubs meeting for recreational 
purposes only, ours is a combination of all these, but is 

105 



primarily and always a home — a big, happy, healthy 
family, all living under one roof as one throbbing unit, 
yet all of entirely different heredity, environment and 
habits, some with untrained or mistrained minds and 
characters, and coming to us at an adolescent or adult 
age where reconstruction, even remoulding, is particu- 
larly difficult. That you, as well as your Head Worker, 
must comprehend this, is most essential. That social 
psychology and general remedial or constructive meth- 
ods are applicable to all, is true; but that each girl, each 
human being, is a forceful and potent personality and 
individuality, with fundamental, unalterable instincts and 
tendencies, with emotions and impulses and habits not 
widely different from yours, except in the degree or 
form of civilization or expression or repression which 
they take; that the traditions of her past must not be 
sacrificed too suddenly to our customs or standards of 
the present; that each must be independently dealt with 
even as no two of your very own children respond to 
the same treatment, and that over and above all, each 
and every one of them must be loved and trusted, rather 
than ruled — loved and loved and loved — then, and then 
only, will all of us arrive at a closer, nobler understand- 
ing of one another and lead a happier, more purposeful 
and more harmonious existence. 

But a warning must also be sounded. In our over- 
enthusiasm and what might almost be termed our 
noveau-riche socialization of ourselves, we must avoid 
the snares of two very dangerous pitfalls, namely, on 
one side the over-systematizing and cold, calculating 
efficiency bordering on institutionalism, in the work; 
and on the other hand, the pell-mell, impulsive, emo- 
tional attack upon petty betterments or ephemeral ap- 
peals, or mushroom activities which consume all our 
time, effort and funds, and thus lose sight of the funda- 
mental truths and larger issues in the background. I 
am not disassociating myself from you in this warning. 
We needs must all recognize a common foe — two com- 
mon foes — while we are still young in our efforts, and 
high in our enthusiasms. In our eagerness to "fill the 
unforgiving minute with sixty seconds' worth of dis- 

106 



tance run," we are some of us prone to lose our equi- 
librium and forget that rationality is essential in the 
application of every new principle. In the words of 
Dr. Cabot, "We have topped a foothill, only to see the 
steeper ranges beyond. " Let us not become blinded or 
dazzled by our vision, nor diverted in our paths or pur- 
poses ; nor let us forget that only through the same 
co-operating and unflagging interest and efforts of all, 
not just a few, we can expect, helpfully and hopefully, 
to attain our goals ! There are very grave breakers 
ahead, and we, who are visioning the future, are not 
misled by the calm, smooth sands of the present, over 
which the tide is now foaming, but in ripples. Those 
of us for whom the war has uprooted all former beliefs 
and convictions need not bemoan the past so much as 
we need to prepare and fortify against the future — a 
preparation particularly needful here at the great Golden 
Gate, where the stream of migration is bound to be 
directed; where an influx of co-religionists must not 
catch us unprepared; where an army of trained Leaders 
and broad, sane Thinkers, and warm, sympathetic Work- 
ers, will be ready and waiting to welcome the incomers 
and to guide and place them. This is a state of Pre- 
paredness which is most urgent. 

The past few months have already brought a small 
tide of these newcomers — of a type higher than in the 
past. Educational opportunities must be afforded them 
and the Sisterhood must not stand back while others 
recognize and respond to the need. We must build and 
fortify and plan, and we need you — men and women 
of vision and of labor — to help us. Not compelled, 
thank God, to solve the complex problems of housing 
congestion or the ills and evils of extreme heat or cold, 
we San Franciscans are in danger of becoming im- 
mersed in small and in individual problems and of for- 
getting to think in larger numbers and in broader con- 
cepts. Even our own organization is a very small part 
of the world's work and the social scheme, but it is not 
going to stay small and it requires a different manner 
of approach and of attack than has been given it in the 
past. We must realize, in the words of Graham Taylor, 

107 



that "A saved life cannot survive in unsaved surround- 
ings, and that the individual cannot be saved inside 
without changing the outside conditions by which he is 
surrounded." 

In conclusion, I wish to emphasize that any real suc- 
cess which has been or which may be obtained, is due 
more to unison of interest and effort and support than 
to any individual leadership; and that the unflagging 
encouragement and stimulating co-operation which have 
been so generously given to your Superintendent, her 
assistants, and the Resident Girls, are the greatest im- 
petus to future attainment. 

To my esteemed and beloved President, unable today 
to be with us, to each and all of my worthy Directors, 
to my loyal House Committee; to Mrs. Ruhland and 
Miss Toor; to my co-workers in this and other organi- 
zations and to leaders therein, mainly Dr. Meyer, Dr. 
Langer and Miss Meininger ; to Miss Haber, who paved 
the path and cleared away the debris to make more 
perfect the structure of the future; and to countless 
others whom I proudly and gratefully claim as friends, 
I wish to offer my whole-souled appreciation and my 
Roycean Loyalty. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ethel R. Feineman. 

San Francisco, April 27, 1916. 



108 



3xst Sloan Asanriaium 

Organized June 17, 1897 

Incorporated December 17, 1897 

Business office — 745 Laguna Street 



OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES FOR 1916 

Officers 

M. Spiegelman, President 

William G. Weiss, Junior Past President 

Harry K. Wolff, First Vice-President 

S. Kragen, Second Vice-President 

D. Lande, Secretary 

P. L. Ballen, Treasurer 

S. Hodes, Custodian of Valuables 

Trustees 

L. Abrams M. H. Coffee 

M. Blackfield Emil Cohn 

C. Cahen A. Sugarman 

J. Waxman 

Collector 
I. H. Kahan 
STANDING COMMITTEES 
Auditing Committee 
M. Blackfield S. Hodes 

C. Cahen J. H. Linsky 

M. H. Coffee Wm. Traube 

J. Waxman 

Hall Committee 
L. Abrams C. Cahen Emil Cohn 

Collection Committee 
M. Blackfield Wm. G. Weiss 

Our office is open for business daily from 9 A. M. to 
12 M. and 1 to 4 P. M. except Saturdays, Sand ays 
and Holidays. 

The Loan Committee meets every Snnday morning 
from 9:30 till 12 o'clock. 

Regular Meetings of the Association are held on the 
3d Sunday of every month at 2 P. M. Monthly dues 25c. 

Applications for loans should be made during the 
early part of each week. 

109 



ANNUAL REPORT OF RETIRING PRESIDENT 



To the Officers and Members of the Chevra Gemilus 
Chasodim {Free Loan Association). 

Gentlemen : 

Another year of the activities of our institution is 
about to pass into the history of San Francisco Jewish 
philanthropic work and the task of a new year's duty 
towards our fellow Jews looms upon us. 

We must utilize our past experiences to make our 
efforts in the future more effective and more beneficial. 
If I were merely called upon to present to you a finan- 
cial report, the figures and the report as the same will 
be read by the Secretary would suffice to illustrate to 
you the amount of work that was accomplished by your 
Loan Committee. It is true that one can only surmise 
as to the amount of good that resulted from this work, 
as time alone will divulge this information. The duty 
of the outgoing President, however, according to prece- 
dents established by other well-organized bodies, is not 
only to report of what has been done, but also to make 
his recommendation of what ought to be done, based 
upon his past experiences. 

I exceedingly regret to state that the gentlemen to 
whom I looked at the commencement of my term, for 
assistance, to help me in my undertaking to build up a 
stronger institution, failed me. Our revenues during 
the year that has just passed have materially decreased, 
and our expenses have not only been the equal of last 
year, but have on the other hand increased. 

In addition to the increased expenditures which were 
necessarily made, the amount of loans made during the 
year have increased over last year by about twenty-five 
(25) per cent. This increase is not an abnormal one; 
and similar increases, if not greater ones, must be looked 
for, from year to year, from now on, while no provi- 
sions have thus far been made to meet this increased 

110 



demand upon us. I do not wish to be understood as 
reproaching the officers of this institution for not having 
done anything to remedy these conditions. They have 
devoted as much of their time as they could offer for 
this cause, their most beneficial energies having been 
devoted in obtaining relief for the millions of Jewish 
war sufferers. While we are all anxious to do all we 
possibly can to benefit and relieve the suffering of our 
fellow Jews of war-ridden Europe, we should not over- 
look our duty to our own sufferers. 

The very fact that our loans have increased within 
the past year by about six thousand dollars ($6,000.00) 
should be taken as a strong indication of what the needs 
of our institution are and will be to meet this growing 
demand upon us. You must bear in mind that this war 
of the European nations has and will increasingly add 
to our already large list of applicants. We should there- 
fore lose no time to improve our own conditions and 
prepare for the increased demands which will be made 
upon us. 

As a means of increasing the revenue of our organi- 
zation, I would urge upon you prompt action upon the 
following suggestions: 

Change the present standard of dues. The member- 
ship should be classified according to the amount of 
their annual subscriptions. 

I would suggest that there be at least four classes of 
membership: A three-dollar, a six-dollar, a nine-dollar 
and a twelve-dollar per annum membership. And in 
addition to this, we should create a "Donor" class and 
a "Life Governor" class. The rights and privileges of 
these respective classes should be definitely described. 

I am not unmindful of the fact in making this recom- 
mendation that opposition will develop on this subject, 
based upon pure sentiment. But, as you know, senti- 
ment brings you nothing and only helps to keep you in 
the same rut that you are in at the present. Other 
institutions have adopted this method of obtaining funds, 
and I can see no reason why we could not adopt this 
same policy with equal success. 

In order that our institution might prosper, and its 

111 



purposes be carried out without restrictions, it will be 
necessary that the leading merchants and possibly some 
of the Jewish bankers of our State be interested in our 
work. We are working for a most noble cause, and I 
cannot prevail upon myself to believe that these men, 
by whom we are so sadly neglected, are keeping away 
from us because of any belief that our work is not 
worthy of their attention. In fact, this is not the case. 
These men know almost nothing about us. Some of 
them are of the impression that we are a small organi- 
zation of orthodox Jews, lending out a few dollars at 
times indiscriminately, yet not enough information has 
reached them to excite their interest. 

The Free Loan Society of New York City existed 
many years before Mr. Jacob Schiff and other men of 
his type became acquainted with its activities, and when 
this new blood took a hand in that institution, it pro- 
gressed by leaps and bounds. I am advised that the 
first donation of Mr. Schifif to that institution was $50,- 
000.00, and ever since he has regarded that institution 
as performing the greatest amount of good. The men 
whom I am aspiring to interest in our institution on 
this Coast are not narrow-minded men. They feel as 
you feel, that money which is devoted to charity should 
be so used as to accomplish the greatest amount of 
good in as permanent form as possible. If you feel 
as I feel, that this institution requires new blood, in- 
creased growth and increased finances to enable us to 
keep pace with time that is to come before us, I would 
urge upon you to use every efifort to bring this class of 
men into our fold. I would recommend that a propa- 
ganda committee of from nine to fifteen be appointed 
whose duty it shall be to disseminate knowledge and 
information concerning our Association and its activities. 

I have thus far dealt with matters which pertain to 
our finances ; I will now take up questions which pertain 
to the manner in which our work should be done. I 
find from an examination of our loan accounts : 1st. That 
we have quite a number of borrowers who continually 
renew their loans after their former loans have been 



112 



paid off. There are cases where a borrower has re- 
newed his loan as many as a dozen times. 2d. I also 
find that about 50 per cent of the loans are not paid 
back to us within the time prescribed by our laws, and 
thirdly, that a certain class of loans are and will never 
be paid back to us. Referring to the first and second 
objections, and to the causes therefor, the borrower is 
not to be blamed. He does all that he possibly could 
to meet his obligations. He is honest and is willing to 
pay, but if he cannot do so, he should not be condemned 
therefor. It simply tends to show that he has not been 
helped properly. As it has often been said here, our 
purpose is to help our co-religionists to help themselves 
and to become self-supporting. In making loans, we 
should not impose too great hardships upon the bor- 
rower nor should we gauge the wants of a borrower by 
the amount of his application. 

Our duty towards the borrower and to this institution 
does not consist in the mere granting of an application 
for a loan, as money in itself is not the all-important 
factor in helping a person to help himself. A compe- 
tent committee should examine thoroughly every appli- 
cant both as to his character as well as to the nature 
of the business to which the loan is to be applied or 
used. This committee should report in detail to the 
Loan Committee, together with his or its recommen- 
dations, and from this report the Loan Committee 
should determine both the amount of the loan as well as 
the manner in which the same is to be repaid to us. 
After the loan is made, our interest in the borrower 
should not cease. We should as much as possible keep 
in close touch with our borrowers and render them all 
possible counsel and advice. A number of cases have 
been brought to my attention, and no doubt to yours, 
where the individual failures were due solely to lack of 
proper counsel and advice. Counsel and advice in a 
number of cases will prove to be of a far greater benefit 
and value to the applicant than the money itself. 

The third objection relates to the $5.00 no-endorser 
loans. 

Some two years ago a resolution was passed by you 

113 



authorizing your Loan Committee to make so-called 
loans in sums not to exceed $5.00 a person and not 
more than twenty in number during any one year. I 
find that all of these loans are loans in name only, but in 
fact are mere donations. 

With but one or two exceptions, none of these so- 
called loans have ever been repaid to us. While not a 
great many of these loans have been made, yet in view 
of the fact that they have proven themselves to be mere 
donations, which do not carry with them an obligation 
on the part of the receiver to pay the same, I consider 
this practice to be in violation of the basic principles 
underlying the existence of this institution. Our pur- 
pose is to and should be to discourage the giving of alms 
to healthy individuals. This practice should be stopped. 
We need our money and more of it to help those who 
are entitled to our assistance and who are willing to 
become self-supporting. Altogether too many institu- 
tions already exist in this city and State, which are a 
large drain on the public, and the result of their activities 
will disclose demoralized and weakened characters, who, 
because of the generosities of these institutions, have 
been reduced to chronic beggars. 

To insure for us the success which we deserve to 
enjoy, the co-operation of every member is essential. 
It is your duty, it is my duty and it is the duty of every 
person who has the privilege of calling himself a Jew, 
from now on to leave no stone unturned and to labor 
until our standard, both financially and morally, has 
attained that degree of perfection when no one shall be 
turned away from our doors who may be entitled to 
our assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Wm. G. Weiss, 

President. 



San Francisco, January 16, 1916. 



114 



INCOME 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION 

For Year Ending December 31, 1915 



From Federation of Jewish Charities $ 2,750.00 

From repayment on loans and loans returned.. . 26,638.60 

From donations 11.00 

From rents 46.00 

From sundries 84.30 



Total $ 29,529.90 

EXPENDITURES 

Loans $28,633.50 

Administrative expenses 2,190.10 

Insurance 21.35 

31,044.95 



Excess expenditures over income $ 1,515.05 

Total number of loans made during the year, 541. 
Total number of loans granted since January 2, 

1898, 5,883, aggregating 181,460.50 

CLASSIFICATION OF LOANS DURING 1915 

Number Denomination Amount 

1 at $ 5.00 $ 5.00 

1 " 8.00 8.00 

6 " 10.00 60.00 

2 " 12.00 24.00 

6 " 15.00 90.00 

5 " .. 20.00 100.00 

1 " 22.50 22.50 

96 " 25.00 2,400.00 

1 " 28.00 28.00 

11 " 30.00 330.00 

4 " 35.00 140.00 

1 " 37.50 37.50 

2 " 40.00 80.00 

279 " 50.00 13,950.00 

2 " 60.00 120.00 

1 " 65.00 65.00 

9 " 75.00 675.00 

92 " 100.00 9,200.00 

1 " 125.00 125.00 

1 " 200.00 200.00 

3 " 300.00 900.00 

16 Sympathetic 73.50 



541 $28,633.50 

Applications for loans denied 39 

115 



3foe Sural Swmty 

Incorporated December 1, 1888 
Business office — 436 O'Farrell Street 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1916 

Officers 

Mrs. Geo. Greenzweig, President 
Mrs. M. Dallman, Vice-President 
Mrs. J. A. Heineberg, Treasurer 
Mrs. Chas. Kalisky, Secretary 

Directors 

Mrs. J. Berg Mrs. B. Phillips 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Year Ending December 31, 1915 
INCOME— 

From Federation of Jewish Charities $ 250.20 

From other sources 318.50 

$ 568.70 
EXPENDITURES 603.00 

Excess expenditures over income $ 34.30 

Capital account January 1, 1915 5,325.38 

Capital account January 1, 1916 5,291.08 



116 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE 
FREE BURIAL SOCIETY 



Ladiks : 

In accordance with custom I present to you our annual 
report which differs very little from last year's. 

Our income the last year was $568.70 and our ex- 
penses were $643.00, showing an excess of $74.30, which 
our Treasurer's report shows. 

We buried eleven women and twelve children during 
the past year. 

In concluding let me thank our good women and our 
Rabbis, who are always ready to assist with our work, 
and thank Mr. Hoffman also. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Emma Greenzweig, 

President. 



117 



HEBREW LADIES' SEWING SOCIETY 

Business office — 436 O'Farrell Street 
Organized December 15, 1869 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1916 

Officers 

Mrs. I. S. Ackerman, President 

Mrs. E. Mandel, Vice-President 

Mrs. Herman Wai^deck, Treasurer 

Mrs. David Kline, Secretary 

Mrs. Wm. Hirschfeld, Honorary Superintendent 

Directors 

Mrs. A. Aronson Mrs Hugo Rothschild 

Mrs. B. Afnhold Mrs. Nellie Saalburg 

Mrs. L. Goodman Mrs. M. Schweitzer 

Mrs. Abe Haas Mrs. J. O. Hirschf elder 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Year Ending December 31, 1915 
INCOME— 

From Federation of Jewish Charities $1,200.00 

Interest 366.35 

From other sources 553.00 

$2,119.35 
EXPENDITURES 3,139.34 

Excess expenditures over income $1,019.99 

Capital account January 1, 1915 9,995.21 

Capital account January 1, 1916. . 8,975.22 



118 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE 
HEBREW LADIES' SEWING SOCIETY 



Ladies : 

As Secretary of the Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Society, 
I hereby submit my annual report for the year extending 
from June 1, 1915, to June 1, 1916. 

During this time, we have supplied underclothing, 
hosiery, bedding, layettes, etc., to 194 families consisting 
of 200 adults and 387 children, and also have assisted the 
Children's Auxiliary of the Hebrew Board of Relief in 
clothing the children under their charge by providing 
materials for dresses and underclothing for 276 children. 

We have been greatly assisted in our work through 
the receipt of several donations of clothing and millinery 
from Marks Bros. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Rose Kline, 
Secretary. 



119 



JEWISH EDUCATIONAL SOCIETY 

Organized August, 1897 
Incorporated November, 1897 



OFFICERS FOR 1916 

Benj. Sch^oss, President 
Rev. M. A. Meyer, Vice-President 
Rev. Jacob Nieto, Secretary 
Ben. Harris, Treasurer 

Directors 

Aaron Altman Rev. Jacob Nieto 

Maurice L. Asher Benj. Schloss 

Benj. Harris Lucius L. Solomons 

Rev. M. A. Meyer M. H. Wascerwitz 



SCHOOLS CONDUCTED 
HAYES VALLEY, Hayes and Laguna 

Rev. H. Samuelson, Principal and Teacher 

Teachers 

Miss Brill Herbert Rabinowitz 

Sessions Tuesday and Thursday, 3 :30 to 5 p. m. 
Saturday and Sunday, 10 to 11 :30 a. m. 
Weekday Sessions held in the morning during Public 
School Vacations. 

SAN BRUNO, Berlin and Bacon, near Public School 

Rev. S. Margolis, Principal and Teacher 

Sessions in rooms of Council of Jewish Women, Sun- 
day, Tuesday and Thursday, 3 :30 to 5 p. m. 

Weekday Sessions held in the morning during Public 
School Vacations. 

120 



BOYS AND GIRLS' AID SOCIETY 

Every Tuesday evening, Henry H. Hart takes charge 
of the Jewish delinquents in this institution. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Year Ending December 31, 1915 

From Federation of Jewish Charities $2,400.00 

From other sources 20.00 



$2,420.00 

EXPENDITURES 3,751.98 

Excess expenditures over income 1,331.98 

Capital account January 1, 1916 $ 912.71 



121 



THE HELPERS 

Organized 1889 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1916 

Officers 
Mrs. J. M. Jacobi, President 
Mrs. Leo Himmelstern, Vice-President 
Mrs. Irving Steinman, Secretary 

Directors 

Mrs. Hugo Abrahamson Mrs. Sophie Lilienthal 

Miss Edith Cohn Miss Belle Nathan 

Mrs. Isaac Frohman Mrs. Leon Roos 

Mrs. Ira Kahn Mrs. Melville Schweitzer 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Year Ending December 31, 1915 

INCOME 

Federation of Jewish Charities, allotment for 1915..$ 750.00 

Contributions towards Employment Fund 134.00 

Interest from bank deposits 27.30 

Total income $ 911.30 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Expenditures towards purchase of clothing and 

material $ 478.77 

Contributions towards Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Socy. 550.00 

Total expenditures , . .$1,028.77 

Expenditures $1,028.77 

Income 911.30 

Deficit $ 117.47 

Capital Account, January 1, 1915 $ 742.93 

Suspense Account, due from Federation account 1914 
apportionment 187.50 

$ 930.43 
Less deficit for 1915 117.47 

Capital Account, January 1, 1916 $ 812.96 

122 



LIST OF CONTRIBUTIONS 

TO 

Federation of Jewish Charities 



Additional 
Niw and 
Increased 
Subscriptions Subscription 
for 1915 for 1916 



Aaron, Leopold, 49 Sansome % 6.00 

Aaron, Moses, 49 Sansome 10.00 

Aaron, Simon, 49 Sansome 6.00 

Abel, Miss Rachel, 1916 California... 30.00 
Abenheim, Florence G., 430 Golden 

Gate Ave 12.00 

Abraham, Chas. J., 1198 McAllister 6.00 

Abraham, Flora, 68 Jordan 3.00 

Abraham, H. J., 1417 9th Ave 6.00 

Abraham, Miss Jeanne, 68 Jordan Av. 6.00 

Abraham, Samuel J., 24 Battery 6.00 

Abrahams, Aaron, 2100 California 300.00 

Abrahams, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, 2100 

California 300.00 

Abrahams, Mr. and Mrs. Max, 717 

Market 24.00 

Abrahamson, Albert, 100 California.. 10.00 
Abrahamson, Mr. and Mrs. Alexan- 
der, 251 Montgomery 25.00 

Abrahamson, Bertram E., 251 Mont- 
gomery 75.00 

Abrahamson, Mr. and Mrs. Henry, 

3837 Clay 200.00 

Abrahamson, Mr. and Mrs. Hugo, 

3001 Jackson 300.00 

Abrahamson, Lionel, 251 Montgomery 30.00 
Abrahamson, Dr. Milton, 240 Stockton 6.00 
Abrahm, Benjamin, 114 Sansome... 20.00 

Abrahm, Dr. Henry, 135 Stockton 20.00 

Abrahm, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 37 

Battery 20.00 

Abrams, Dr. Albert, 291 Geary 100.00 

Abrams, Mrs. Dr. Albert, Hotel Fair- 
mont 125.00 

Abrams, Joseph D., 1290 Sutter 6.00 

Abrams, Louis, 520 Hayes 15.00 

Abrams, N., 52 Sansome 21.00 

Abramson, Edward, 611 Baker 36.00 

Ach, Mr. and Mrs. Henry, Room 316, 

Balboa Bldg 250.00 

Ackerman, Mrs. Chas. L., 785 Market 100.00 

Ackerman, E. P., 883 Market 10.00 

Ackerman, Mr. and Mrs. Irving C, 

785 Market 100.00 

Ackerman, Isadore H„ 130 Post 100.00 

Ackerman, Mr. and Mrs. Isidore S., 

2454 Broadway 100.00 

Ackerman, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd S., 14 
Montgomery 75.00 



123 



1915 1916 

Ackerman, Samuel J., O'Farrell and 

Stockton 100.00 

Ackerman, Mr. Sigmund L., Room 

361, Mills Bldg 75.00 

Adelsdorfer, Max, 525 Market 30.00 

Adler, Aaron A., Van Ness and 

Broadway 15.00 

Adler, Dr. Albert S., 1659 Webster... 21.00 

Adler, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob, 234 Pine. 50.00 

Adler, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Lewis, 

3570 Clay 100.00 

Adler, Mrs. Jennie Solomon, 1899 

California 50.00 

Alexander, D., Hotel Bristol 10.00 

Alexander, Harry, 149 Bush 20.00 

Alexander, Henry, Watsonville, Cal.. 10.00 

Alexander, Jewel, Rm. 1016, Mills Bid. 6.00 

Alexander, Leo B., 444 Market 50.00 

Alexander, L. S., Watsonville, Cal... 6.00 

Alexander, Michel S., 444 Market 50.00 

Alexander, Miss Sarah, 2030 Scott... 6.00 

Alpers, Mr. and Mrs. A., 99 Folsom.. 50.00 

Alter, Marcus, 228 Sixth 9.00 

AltschuL Mr. and Mrs. Charles, 32 

West 86th, New York 100.00 

Altschul, Richard, Sutter & Sansome 100.00 125.00 

Altman, John C, Wells Fargo Bldg 20.00 

Altschuler, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 3370 

Clay 25.00 

Alumni, P. H. O. A., 664 Waller St.. 12.00 

Ancker, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham, 831 

Market 25.00 

Ancker, Louis, Hotel Monroe 24.00 

Annixter, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin, 

1414 Divisadero 12.50 -. 

Annixter, Mr. and Mrs. Harris, 1414 

Divisadero 25.00 

Annixter, Mr. and Mrs. Louis H., 1414 

Divisadero 12.50 

Anshel, Miss Ray, 1574 Grove 12.00 

Anspacher, Mr. and Mrs. Philip, 2901 

Pacific Ave 250.00 

Anspacher, Mr. and Mrs. Simon, 519 

California 150.00 

Anthony, Mrs. Lena, 2591 Sutter 3.00 

Arendt, Alfred L., Room 527, Mer- 
chants' Exchange 25.00 

Arendt, Mrs. H., Pleasanton, Cal.... 25.00 

Armer, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew M., 

Larkspur, Cal., 6.00 

Armer, Ben, 499 Monadnock Bldg 6.00 

Arnhold, Mrs. B., Hotel Richelieu 25.00 

Arnstein, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence, 3d 

and Mission 100.00 

Arnstein, Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig, 3d 

and Mission 250.00 

Arnstein, Mr. and Mrs. Walter, Room 

305, Hobart Bldg 300.00 

Aronson, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham, 160 

Sutter 250.00 

Aronson, Mr. and Mrs. Charles S., 

3051 Clay 12.00 

Aronson, Daniel, 160 Sutter , 25.00 

Aronson, Mrs. Frank, 454 Divisadero 3.00 ..... 

Aschheim, Israel J., 149 Eddy 24.00 

Asheim, M., 619 Market 6.00 



124 



1915 1916 

Asher, Albert, Drumm & Washington 50.00 

Asher, Charles L., 707 Market 12.00 

Asher, Isaac J., 1574 Hayes 6.00 

Asher, Mrs. Maurice L., 2513 Sacra- 
mento 24.00 

Auerbach, A., 334 Sutter 10.00 

Auerbach, Milton, 3178 Washington.. 10.00 

Auerbach, Mrs. L., 3536 Clay 50.00 

Axelrod, Berel, 1549 Octavia 6.00 

B 

Bachman, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur, 

Commercial and Front 300.00 

Bachman, David S., 920 Kohl Bldg. . 100.00 

Bachman, Lawrence, care D. N. & E. 

Walter Co., Stockton at O'Parrell 6.00 12.00 

Bachman, Mr. and Mrs. Leopold S., 

919 Kohl Bldg 200.00 

Bachman, Mrs. Sarah H., 110 Market 30.00 50.00 

Bachman, Mrs. Simon, 2100 Wash... 750.00 

Bachman, Walter N., 41 Sansome... 6.00 

Badt, Mrs. Lina, 3038 Jackson 50.00 

Badt, Melville S., Wells, Nev 6.00 

Badt, Mrs. Melville S., Wells, Nev... 6.00 

Badt, Milton, Chronicle Bldg 6.00 

Baer, Dr. Adolph B., Liebes Bldg... 25.00 

Baer, Mrs. E. A., Keystone ^pts 12.00 

Baer, Mr. & Mrs. Joseph, 1200 Geary. 48.00 

Baer, Dr. Julius, 177 Post 25.00 

Ballen & Weinburg, 304 Eleventh 18.00 

Ballen, Philip L., 509 Sansome 15.00 

Ballin, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice, Gough 

and Grove 50.00 

Bamberger, Julius, 134 Front 9.00 

Bamburg, Mrs. Rosa, 592 Second Ave. 10.00 

Banner, Mr. and Mrs. Marcus, 925 
Market 25.00 

Barkan, Dr. Adolph, Hotel Bellevue 25.00 

Barnett, Judge Abraham T., Justices' 

Court 30.00 

Baron, William, 970 Sutter 25.00 

Baruch, Mr. and Mrs. Albert, Room 

1216, Merchants' Exchange Bldg. . . 150.00 

Baruch, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick, Rm. 

1216, Merchants' Exchange Bldg... 250.00 

Baruh, Marcus M., 635 Battery 50.00 

Basker, Solomon, First and Market.. 6.00 

Bauer, Herbert F., 49 Sansome 3.00 

Bauer, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 49 San- 
some 200.00 

Bauer, Sigmund, 733 Market 50.00 

Baum, Mr. & Mrs. Benj. J., 415 Bat- 
tery 25.00 

Baum, Ben S., 2918 Jackson 6.00 

Baum, Mrs. Clara, 2335 Pacific Ave. . 50.00 

Baum, Miss Helen H., 2335 Pacific Av. 3.00 

Baum, Simon, 2918 Jackson 15.00 

Becker, Louis, 178 Eddy 10.00 

Beerman, D., 116 Main 6.00 

Beerman, Dr. Wilfred F., Butler Bid. 25.00 

Behrend, D., 2205 Market 5.00 

Behrend, J. F., 460 Bryant 50.00 

Bender, Albert M., 311 California 100.00 

Bender, Noah W., 2412 Mission 10.00 

Bendheim, Edward, Room 829, Mon- 
adnock Bldg 3.00 



125 



1915 1916 
Bennett, Mrs. D. Gates, 2090 Divisa- 

dero 10.00 

Bennett, Mrs. Sarah D., 87 6th Ave. . 3.00 

Berg, Mrs. A., 1824 Buchanan 3.00 

Berg, Mr. & Mrs. Jacob, 641 Merchant 6.00 

Berg, Sig. F., 312 Locust 12.00 

Berger, Sam, 856 Market 6.00 

Berl, Harry, 405 California 50.00 

Berliner, Chas. A., Post and Larkin. 9.00 

Berliner, Mrs. Chas. A., 2610 Howard 3.00 

Berman, Otto, 966 Market 6.00 

Bernhard, J., 809 Shrader 5.00 

Bernstein, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvan L., 

154 Sutter 200.00 

Bettman, Lawrence, 461 Market 6.00 

Bettman, Sig. M., 461 Market 25.00 

Betzel, A., 2201 California 6.00 

Bibbero, Mr. and Mrs. David, 2961 

Pacific Ave 50.00 

Bien, Joseph E., Rm. 1114, Head Bid. 50.00 

Bienenfeld, A. M., Rialto Bldg 150.00 

Bienenfeld, Bernard, Room 621, Wells 

Fargo Bldg 12.00 

Bier, Hypolite, 316 Battery 12.00 

Bine, Mrs. Rene, 317 Cherry 11.00 

Birnbaum, Louis, 2787 Mission 10.00 

Bissinger, Mr. and Mrs. George 

Henry, care Argonaut Club 50.00 

Bissinger, Isidore, corner Front and 

Jackson 100.00 

Bissinger, Mr. and Mrs. Newton, 

Front and Jackson 100.00 

Bissinger, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 2129 

Jackson 1000.00 

Blackfield, Max, 385 Fell 10.00 

Blankenstein, G., 907 McAllister 12.00 

Blaskower, C, 201 Montgomery 12.00 

Bloch, Mrs. Celine, care Dr. Herbert 

I. Bloch, Physicians' Bldg 25.00 

Bloch, Mr. and Mrs. Henry M., 1105 

Gough 25.00 

Bloch, Mrs. Leon, 170 Geary 6.00 

Bloch, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, Room 

702, Alaska Commercial Bldg 150.00 200.00 

Bloch, Mrs. Marie, 538 Divisadero 36.00 

Blochman, Miss H., 1911 Lyon 3.00 

Block, Mrs. Amelia, Hotel Richelieu 26.00 

Block, Daniel, 1392 Geary 100.00 

Block, James N., 160 Sansome 25.00 50.00 

Block, Mr. and Mrs. Leo, 149 2d 50.00 

Block, Mrs. Milton I., 222 9th Ave... 3.00 

Bloom, David, Kohl Bldg 33.00 

Bloom, David C, 2734 Army 25.00 

Bloom, Jonas, Kohl Bldg 1,500.00 

Bloom, Max, 45 Washington 6.00 

Bloom, Meyer, 45 Washington 3.00 

Bloom, Mrs. S., 2734 Army 9.00 

Bloom, Samuel, 416 Battery 75.00 

Bloom, Mr. and Mrs. Sol., 68 Post 12.00 

Bloomingdale, Miss Freada, 1701 Bush 6.00 

Blum, Charles B., 3062 Jackson 3.00 

Blum, Isidore L., 1490 Fairfax Ave.. 50.00 

Blum, Mr. and Mrs. Jacques, 200 Mis- 
sion 50.00 

Blum, James B., Room 304, Mer- 
chants' Exchange Bldg 25.00 

Blum, Leon, 1490 Fairfax Ave 250.00 

Blum, Mr. and Mrs. Max, 255 Calif.. 75.00 



126 



1915 1916 

Blum, Mrs. Max, 1382 McAllister 6.00 

Blum, Morris. 737 Castro 3.00 

Blum, Mr. and Mrs. Moses, Room 304, 

Merchants' Exchange Bldg 300.00 

Blum, Dr. Sanford, 126 Stockton 25.00 

Blum, Mrs. Simon, Polk & California 50.00 

Blum, Wolf, 1469 Stockton 3.00 

Blumenthal, Mrs. A., 3443 Clay 12.00 

Blumenthal, Charles, Room 323 Mon- 
adnock Bldg 10.00 

Blumenthal, Leo, Room 304, Mer- 
chants' Exchange Bldg 100.00 

Blumlein, Emil, 140 Spear 25.00 

Blumlein, Jacob, 140 Spear 125.00 

Boas, Ben, 454 Montgomery 10.00 

Boas, Mr. and Mrs. Chas., 454 Mont- 
gomery 20.00 

Boas, J. M., 149 Market 6.00 

Boas, Nat, 454 Montgomery 50.00 

Bollack, Alphonse, 135 Kearny 12.00 

Borach, Mrs. B., Yolo, Yolo Co., Cal. 6.00 

Boskowitz, Dr. George H„ 516 Sutter 25.00 

Brandenstein, Alfred J., cor. Spear 
and Mission 150.00 

Brandenstein, Mr. and Mrs. Charles, 

Spear and Mission 150.00 

Brandenstein, Mr. and Mrs. Edw., 126 
Mission 500.00 

Brandenstein, Fred T., Mission and 

Spear 50.00 

Brandenstein, Mr. and Mrs. H. U., 

250 Montgomery 100.00 

Brandenstein, Miss Jane, 2030 Gough. 3.00 

Brandenstein, Mr. and Mrs. Man- 
fred, 2676 Pacific Ave 500.00 

Brandenstein, Martin, Spear and 
Mission 12.00 

Brandenstein, Mr. and Mrs. Max J., 

Spear and Mission 750.00 

Brandenstein, Miss Susan, 2030 

Gough 3.00 

Brandt, Lawrence, 47 Sansome 12.00 

Braun, M. H., 1101 McAllister 12.00 

Breitstein, Mrs. E., 2565 Washington 6.00 

Bremer, Mrs. Amelia, Hotel Norman- 
die 50.00 

Bremer, Milton A., 312 Montgomery.. 75.00 

Brenner, Mr. and Mrs. Gustave, Rm. 

499, Monadnock Bldg 200.00 

Breslauer, Mrs. R., 990 Geary 11.00 

Breyer, Sam T., 126 Bush 3.00 

Brodsky, Henry J., 110 Market 10.00 

Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham, Ho- 
tel Richelieu 200.00 

Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Lin- 
coln, Mills Bldg 250.00 

Brown, Bernard C, 871 Market 20.00 

Brown, Charles, 168 Poplar Ave., San 
Mateo 50.00 

Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Charles H., 

Room 415, Humboldt Bank Bldg. . . 50.00 

Brown, Herbert M., Room 852, Mills 
Building 12.00 

Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Isidore I., 14 
Montgomery 50.00 

Brown, Louis C, care The Orpheum 50.00 

Brown, Mrs. Nathan, 3535 Wash 12.00 



127 



1915 1916 



Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Morris, 1400 

Sutter 500.00 

Brownstein, Julius, Pac. & Sansome. 50.00 
Brownstone, Mrs. Louis H., 27 Com- 
monwealth Ave 15.00 

Brunn, Dr. and Mrs. Harold, Butler 

* Bldgf 30.00 

Brunswick, Mrs. Theo., 1661 Sutter.. 3.00 

Brunswick, Theo., 1661 Sutter . .. 3.00 

Brunner, Miss Claire, 644 Market 3.00 

Brunner, Miss Johanna, 644 Market. . 3.00 

Bush, Philip L., 120 Market 15.00 

Buyer, Charles, 1487 Haight 24.00 



Cahen, David S., 2252 California 50.00 

Cahen, Mr. and Mrs. Isidore W., 2473 

Jackson 50.00 

Cahen, Joseph, 45 Kearny 6.00 

Cahn, Mrs. Babette, 2102 Baker 75.00 

Cahn, Mr. and Mrs. Julius I., 2209 

Buchanan 200.00 

Cahn, Mr. and Mrs. Leopold I., 3540 

Washington 150.00 

Cahn, Mr. and Mrs. Maier A., Room 

302, Nevada Bank Bldg 20.00 

Cahn, Mr. and Mrs. Mayer I., 557 

Mission 250.00 

Cahn, Mr. and Mrs. Meyer L., 3020 

Clay 50.00 

Cahn, Nathan, 860 Fell 50.00 

Caro, Mr. & Mrs. A. W., 709 Mission 12.00 

Caro, Mrs. Flora, 3122 Sacramento. . . 12.00 

Caro, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac W., 2377 

Sutter 20.00 

Caro, Mrs. Samuel, 161 9th Ave 10.00 

Castle, Albert E., 106 Pine 150.00 

Castle, Arthur H., 106 Pine 150.00 

Castle, Mr. and Mrs. Walter M., 106 

Pine 150.00 

Chalfin, Max, 768 Fulton 12.00 

Chamberlain, Mrs. Helene L., 381 

Bush 60.00 

Charles, Mr. and Mrs. Max, 153 Geary 50.00 

Charmack, Golda, 1624 Sacramento.. 3.00 

Choynski, Harry, Sansome & Sutter.. 6.00 

Choynski, Mr. and Mrs. Isaiah N., 

The Chronicle 12.00 

Clayburgh, Herbert E., 482 California 100.00 

Clayburgh, Mrs. Katy, 482 California 100.00 

Clayburgh, Mr. and Mrs. Leo J., 25 

Sansome 100.00 200.00 

Clayburgh, Mr. and Mrs. Leon S., 

Post and Kearny 30.00 

Clayburgh, Mr. and Mrs. Simon, 1916 

Jackson 250.00 

Coblentz, Mr. and Mrs. Felix, 336 Clay 25.00 

Coblentz, Mr. and Mrs. Jules, 115 

Front 30.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Abraham, 1337 Laguna. . 6.00 

Cohen, Benjamin, 115 7th Ave 6.00 

Cohen, Bertha, 2200 Post 6.00 

Cohen, Charles A., 57 Post 20.00 

Cohen, Mrs. H., 118 W. 112th St., 

New York 24.00 

Cohen, Herrman, 717 Market 21.00 ..... 



128 



1915 1916 

Cohen, Mrs. Herrman, 717 Market 6.00 

Cohen, Isidor, 326 J St., Sacramento 75.00 

Cohen, J. M., 15 Battery 5.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Joseph and Regina, 1622 

McAllister 18.00 

Cohen, Philip, 82 East 21.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Reuben, 2417 Webster... 12.00 

Cohen, Robert, 1213A Scott 6.00 

Cohen, William, Hotel St. Francis... 150.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Wm. L., 1937 G. G. Ave. 6.00 

Cohn, Abe, 1100 Fillmore 12.00 

Cohn, Ben J., 1913 Franklin 50.00 

Cohn, Adolph, 1144 O'Farrell 10.00 

Cohn, Mrs. Arthur, 2339 Union 6.00 

Cohn, Dr. David, 1404 Sutter 38.00 

Cohn, George D., 1404 Sutter 20.00 

Cohn, Mrs. H., 1467 O'Farrell 3.00 

Cohn, Mrs. H., No. 2, 1437 O'Farrell.. 6.00 

Cohn, Herman, 928 Market 6.00 

Cohn, Mrs. Herman, 1876 Market 3.00 

Cohn, J., Davis and Washington. . . . 6.00 

Cohn, Mrs. J., Davis and Washington, 3.00 

Cohn, Marion D., 1404 Sutter 20.00 

Cohn, Max, 1036 Golden Gate Ave 12.00 

Cohn, Mr. and Mrs. Max M., 12 

Monte Ave., Oakland, Cal 25.00 75.00 

Cohn, Dr. Robert D., 126 Stockton... 25.00 

Cohn, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 1913 

Franklin 100.00 

Cohn, Theodore, 2438 Clay 5.00 

Coleman, L. C, 536 13th Ave 6.00 

Colman, Mr. and Mrs. Charles, 780 

Market 25.00 

Colman, Jesse C, 780 Market 25.00 

Colton, Mrs. A. D., 545 Sixth Ave 6.00 

Coney, J. A., Centerville, Cal 10.00 

Constine, Dr. Louis, 1350 Ellis 6.00 

Constine, Louis, Rm. 739, City Hall.. 3.00 

Cook, Miss Corinne, 1658 Broadway. . 5.00 

Cook, H., 1137 Bush 25.00 

Cook, Mrs. Isaac, 1658 Broadway 10.00 

Cook, Nathan I., 454 Montgomery 10.00 

Cowen, Mr. and Mrs. A. H., 24 Cali- 
fornia . .., 12.00 

Crocker, A., 21 Sansome 25.00 

Crocker, Aaron, 1419 Stockton 50.00 

Crocker, J., 775 Post 25.00 

Cunningham, Mrs. T., 106 Pine 6.00 



Dahlman, Isaac Henry, 333 Mont- 
gomery 10.00 

Dallman, Mrs. M., 1436 Buchanan 3.00 

Dannenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. Salomon, 

3997 Washington 60.00 

Dannenbaum, Sam, 331 Front 12.00 

Dannenbaum, Dr. Sidney R., Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons' Bldg 6.00 

Dannenberg, Miss Louise, Hotel Nor- 

mandie 15.00 

Davis, Alvin, Sutter and Grant Ave.. 10.00 

Davis, D., 1565 Scott 9.00 

Davis, Mrs. D., 1565 Scott 6.00 

Davis, Mr. and Mrs. David, 538 Di- 

visadero 18.00 



129 



1915 1916 



Davis, George C, 247 California 6.00 

Davis, Mrs. Geo. H., 314 Walnut 30.00 

Davis, Max, Sutter and Grant Ave... 50.00 
Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Percy L., Pacific 

Building 20.00 

Davis, Siegfried, 926 Crocker Bldg. . . 6.00 
Davis, Sylvain D., Sutter and Grant 

Avenue 10.00 

De Bare, J. M., 2440 Mission 7.00 

Deitch, Max J., 214 Valencia 3.00 

Dernham, Mr. and Mrs. Albert, 2d 

and Mission 250.00 

Dernham, Henry (in memory of), 

Room 1051, Mills Bldg 350.00 

Deutsch, Solomon, 1418 Polk 6.00 

Diamond, Leon I., care Fresno Out- 
fitting Co., Fresno, Cal 3.00 

Diamond, Mrs. Nathan, 3006 Clay 6.00 

Dienstag, Max (in memory of), care 

Almondale Farm, Modesto 25.00 

Diller, Ben, 1088 McAllister 15.00 

Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Emil, Hotel Riche- 
lieu 6.06 

Dinkelspiel, Mr. and Mrs. H. G. W., 

Room 806, Claus Spreckels Bldg. . 50.00 
Dinkelspiel, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S., 

150 Post 200.00 

Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Louis M., 624 Wals- 

worth Ave., Oakland 20.00 

Dinkelspiel, Samuel B., Room 301, 

150 Post 10.00 

Dinkelspiel, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel L., 

24 Battery 300.00 

Dobrzensky, Leopold, Newman, Cal.. 12.00 
Dodge, Mrs. Rebecca P., Mendocino, 

California 3.00 

Dollinger, Marcus, 139 Valencia 3.00 

Dollinger, Mrs. Marcus, 139 Valencia 6.00 

Dreyfus, Emil B., 311 California 3.00 

Dreyfus, Walter, 311 California 3.00 

Dunn, Mrs. Anetta, Cornell Hotel... 6.00 
Dusenbery, Lewis, 333 Central Park 

W., New York 33.00 



Edelman, Charles, 451 California 25.00 

Edlin, Henry N., 877 Market 6.00 12.00 

Edlin, Mr. and Mrs. J., 216 O'Farrell. . 25.00 

Edlin, M. H., 216 O'Farrell 6.00 

Edlin, N., 1228 Folsom 12.00 

Ehrlich, Mrs. H., 1278 G. G. Ave 6.00 

Ehrlich, Morris, 1288 Golden Gate Av. 6.00 

Ehrlich, Sam, 310 Sansome 3.00 

Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. Albert L., 149 

Montgomery 300.00 

Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. Alexis L., 134 

Front 200.00 

Ehrman, Mr. & Mrs. Alfred, 134 Front 200.00 

Ehrman, Joseph, 24 California 250.00 

Ehrman, Mrs. Joseph, Hotel St. 

Francis 100.00 

Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. Myer, 24 Cal.. 500.00 

Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney M., Nevada 

Bank Bldg 500.00 ..... 



130 



1915 1916 

Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. Sol W., 24 

California 300.00 

Eibeshutz, A. W., 135 Montgomery... 9.00 

Eisenbach, Mrs. A., 3163 Washington 50.00 

Eisenbach, David R., 408 Flat Iron 

Bldg 20.00 

Eisenbach, Mrs. David R., 408 Flat 

Iron Bldg. 6.00 

Eisenbach, Mrs. Ella, 707 Flanders 

St., Portland, Oregon 6.00 

Eisenbach, Julius, Room 408 Flat 

Iron Bldg 20.00 

Eisenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph, 85 

Post 50.00 

Eisenberg, Al. 85 Post 25.00 

Eisenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Ignacz N.. 

1140 Market 50.00 

Eisner, David, 434 Jackson 3.00 6.00 

Elberg, Mrs. Annette, 1600 Polk 6.00 

Elberg, Isadore, 18 Turk 6.00 

Elkus, Mrs. Albert, 1515 N St., Sac- 
ramento 5.00 

Elkus, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene S., 779 

Mission 30.00 

Ellis, Marion R., 100 California 12.00 

Eloesser, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur, 77 

Battery 100.00 

Eloesser, Herbert, 77 Battery 6.00 

Eloesser, Dr. Leo A., 77 Battery 6.00 

Elsasser, Jonas, 110 Market 21.00 

Emanuel, Joseph L., 3330 Jackson... 50.00 

Englander, Aaron, 635 Battery 50.00 

Englander, Henry M., 635 Battery... 50.00 

Enkle, Mrs. Matilda E., Hotel Balti- 
more 6.00 

Eppinger, Josua, Room 243 Russ Bid 12.00 

Eppinger, J. John, 32 Geary 6.00 

Eppstein, Julius, 255 Powell 12.00 

Epstein, Arthur, 25 Sansome 25.00 

Epstein, Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel, 2402 

Divisadero 21.00 

Epstein, Gustave, 482 California 50.00 

Epstein, Samuel, 28 Bourbon 6.00 

Erb, Isidore, 565 Webster 6.00 

Erlanger, Jonas, 216 Drumm 25.00 

Esberg, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred I., 119 

West 40th, New York 500.00 

Esberg, Mrs. Mathilda. Cal. & Front. 250.00 

Esberg, Mr. and Mrs. Milton H., 3444 

Washington 250.00 500.00 

Eschen, Mr. & Mrs. Dee, 114 Sansome 25.00 

Ettlinger, Bernard, Room 602, Mer- 
chants' Exchange Bldg 25.00 

Ettlinger, Isaac L., Room 602, Mer- 
chants' Exchangp Bldg 50.00 

Ezekial, Abram, 133 Market 3.00 



Fabian, Lawrence, 3641 Clay 12.00 

Fabian, Mrs. Philip, 3641 Clav 33.00 

Falk, Adrien J., 326 Maple. . 15.00 

Falk, Cam S., 740 Mission 25.00 

Falk, Mrs. Jennie, 326 Maple 12.00 



131 



1915 1916 

Falkenstein, Adele M., 341 Front 3.00 

Falkenstein, Monroe H., Commercial 

and Front 6.00 

Fass, A. S., 528 Washington 15.00 

Feder, Miss Ray, 245 Lake 3.00 

Federlein, Miss Sophie (in memory 

of), care Carrie Jacobs, 860 Sutter 17.00 25.00 

Feigenbaum, Mrs. B., Hotel Richelieu 25.00 

Feigenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. Julius, 555 

Market 100.00 

Feigenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. L. B., 555 

Market 100.00 

Feigenbaum, Louis. Room 305 Mon- 

adnock Bldg 50.00 

Feineman, Miss Ethel R., 1017 

Steiner 9.00 

Feist, Mrs. Adolph, 16 Geary 27.00 

Ferguson, Mrs. James H., 2067 Green 3.00 

Feustmann, Joseph B., 320 Market.. 6.00 

Fishel, David, 41 Sansome 12.00 

Fisher, George W., 2424 Mission 6.00 

Fisher, Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey, 433 

California 40.00 

Flamm, G., 140 Geary 12.00 

Fleischer, Mr. and Mrs. Benedict, 

Rm. 501 Merchants' Exch. Bldg 50.00 

Fleisher, Marks, 3020 Jackson 6.00 

Fleischman, Mr. and Mrs. M. R., 15 

Battery 20.00 

Fleishhacker, Mrs. Delia, Hotel St. 

Francis 300.00 

Fleishhacker, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert, 

134 Fremont 1500.00 

Fleishhacker, Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer, 

Anglo-California Trust Co 1500.00 

Fleishman, Mr. and Mrs. L. P., 1944 

Divisadero 50.00 

Fleishman, Mrs. B. M., 2205 Sacra- 
mento 18.00 

Fleishman, Mrs. Helen B., 210 Cen- 
tral Ave., Los Angeles, Cal 50.00 

Fleishman, Mr. and Mrs. Isidore, care 

Union Trust Co 100.00 

Fleishman, Mr. and Mrs. S. G., 1730 

Jones 100.00 

Fogel, George, 636 Grove 9.00 

Foorman, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac S., 10 

San Mateo Ave., San Mateo 75.00 

Foorman, Mrs. Sam, 10 San Mateo 

Ave., San Mateo 75.00 

Fox, Harry S., 100 California 5.00 

Fox, Milton G., 2121 Tenth, West 

Berkelev, Cal 50.00 

Fox, Sarah, 1216 Arguello Blvd 25.00 

Frank, A. L., 2303 Divisadero 21.00 

Frank, Mrs. A. L., 2303 Divisadero.. 21.00 

Frank, Mr. and Mrs. Albert, 416 Bat- 
tery 200.00 

Frank, Herbert L., Hotel Multnomah, 

Portland, Oregon 6.00 

Frank, Imar, 154 Sutter 6.00 

Frank, J. S. H., Yokohama, Japan.. 12.00 

Frank, Mrs. Jenny, 399 Laurel 6.00 

Frank, Mrs. Josephine S., 2521 Scott. . 200.00 

Frank, Ludwig, Room 701, Alaska 

Commercial Bldg 6.00 

Frank, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall, Room 

406, Merchants' Exchange Bldg 50.00 

132 



1915 1916 

Frank, Mrs. Maurice, 2881 Vallejo 3.00 

Frank, Morris E., cor. 18th & Bryant 25.00 

Frankel, Herman, 151 Post 20.00 

Frankel, S., 1068 McAllister 3.00 

Frankenburg, A., 3554 20th 6.00 

Frankenau, Mr. and Mrs. Max, 115 

Front 55.00 

Frankenheimer, Dr. Jules B., 240 

Stockton 50.00 

Franklin, Mrs. Pauline, Room 767 

Phelan Bldg\ 50.00 

Franklin, Mrs. Annie, Butler Bldg... 9.00 

Franklin, Harry P., 58 2d 25.00 

Franklin, Mrs. Henrietta, 1790 O'Far- 

rell 15.00 

Franklin, Mrs. Max J., 2946 Calif... 6.00 

Franklin, Moses J., 2071 Sutter 6.00 

Franklin, Mrs. Moses J.. 2071 Sutter 6.00 

Freund, William, 1240 Broderick 12.00 

Fried, Isaac, 40 Drumm 6.00 

Friedenrich, David, 460 Montgomery. 150.00 

Friedlander, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph, 

Sansome and Sutter 50.00 

Friedlander, Dr. David, 146 Grant Av. 20.00 

Friedlander, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, 240 

Montgomery 100.00 

Friedlander, Morris, 49 Portola 12.00 16.00 

Friedlander, Mrs. S. J., 2930 Pac. Av. 9.00 

Friedlander, T. C, Merchants' Ex- 
change Bldg 6.00 

Friedman, Alfred, 130 Bush 6.00 

Friedman, Henry A., 259 Post 25.00 

Friedman, Israel & Abe, 259 Post 75.00 

Friedman, Mrs. L,., 1740 Franklin 12.00 

Friedman, Mr. and Mrs. Marx, Hotel 

Richelieu 250.00 

Friedman, Mr. and Mrs. Myer, 3804 

Clay 50.00 100.00 

Friedman, P., Hotel Normandie. . . . 3.00 

Friedman, Samuel M., 3060 Jackson 25.00 

Friend, S. H., 704 Market 15.00 

Fries, Frank H., 120 Market 100.00 150.00 

Fries, Mr. & Mrs. Wm., 120 Market.. 750.00 

Friesleben, H. M., 2226 Washington. 6.00 10.00 
Frohman, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac, Room 

909 Kohl Bldg 50.00 

Frowenfeld, Ed., 120 Market 25.00 

Frowenfeld, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob, 333 

Kearny 100.00 

Frucht, M., 234 Richland Ave 12.00 

Funkenstein, Edward, Room 210, Clu- 

nie Bldg 25.00 

Furst, Philip, in memory of, Hotel 

Bristol 25.00 

Furst, Mrs. Mai., 220 11th Ave 15.00 

Furth, Mrs. Simon, 657 Walsworth 

Ave., Oakland, Cal 250.00 

Furth, Mr. and Mrs. Melville, 100 

Stockton 50.00 

Furth, Mrs. Simon, 657 Walsworth 

Ave., Oakland, Cal., 250.00 



Gabriel, Harry, 10 Spear 6.00 

Gabriel, Seymour, 565 Market 12.00 



133 



1915 1916 

Galinski, Samuel, 501 O'Farrell 6.00 

Gall, Charles F., 519 California 10.00 

Gall, Rebecca F., 2261 Jackson 20.00 

Galland, Mr. and Mrs. Barney B., 

315 8th 50.00 

Galland, Mr. and Mrs. Edward B., 

315 8th 50.00 

Ganz, Mrs. Flora M., 1400 Sutter 50.00 

Gassner, Mrs. Louis, 112 Geary 35.00 

Geballe, Harry, Rm. 364, Phelan Bldg. 6.00 

Geballe, Mrs. I. H., 1624 Sacramento 6.00 

Geist, Mr. and Mrs. Wm., 1721 Oak.. 18.00 

Gellert, Mrs. Isaac, 1802 McAllister.. 12.00 

Gensberger, Lisette, 220 Commercial 12.00 

Genser, Israel, 1138 Turk 15.00 

Gerstle, Mrs. Hannah, 310 Sansome. .1000.00 

Gerstle, Mr. and Mrs. Mark L., 310 

Sansome , 300.00 

Gerstle, Mr. and Mrs. William L., 

310 Sansome 300.00 

Getz, Mrs. Amelia, 151 14th Ave. ... 50.00 

Getz, Mrs. Hattie, 807 Grove 6.00 

Getz, Mrs. Johanna, 2417 Webster... 27.00 

Getz, Mrs. Lew J., Hotel Granada 3.00 

Getz, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, Davis and 

Jackson 100.00 

Getz, Mr. and Mrs. Milton E., 740 

South Broadway, Los Angeles 100.00 

Getz, Solomon, 328, Chronicle Bldg. 50.00 

Getz, Mrs. Sol, 328 Chronicle Bldg.. 25.00 

Ghinsberg, Samuel, 436 O'Farrell 6.00 

Ginsberg, J., 206 J St., Sacramento.. 3.00 

Gluck, Mr. and Mrs. K., 215 Web- 
ster, Oakland 9.00 

Godchaux, The Misses, 2060 Buchanan 40.00 

Goldberg, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph, 460 

Battery 25.00 

Goldberg, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob, 242 

Sutter 200.00 

Goldberg, Max, 320 Market 25.00 

Goldberg, Sol B., 242 Sutter 6.00 

Golden, Isidore M., Mills Bldg 25.00 

Golden, Wolf, 2605 Post 3.00 

Goldfish, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin, 

Room 701, Nevada Bank Bldg 50.00 

Goldman, A., 73 Minna 25.00 

Goldman, Isaac, 788 Market 24.00 

Goldman, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph, 216 

Pine 100.00 

Goldman, Louis J., 591 Mission 50.00 

Goldsmith, Miss Ada, 1904 Sutter... 25.00 

Goldsmith, Mrs. Ben A., 2300 Jackson 6.00 

Goldsmith, Miss Bertha, 1904 Sutter.. 12.00 

Goldsmith, Mrs. Clemence, 1387 Geary 10.00 

Goldsmith, H. M., care M. J. Brand- 

enstein & Co., Spear and Mission 10.00 

Goldsmith, Miss Rose, 1904 Sutter 20.00 

Goldsmith. Marc. Room 702 Alaska 

Commercial Bldg 6.00 

Goldsmith, Mrs. Sol, 164 Powell 5.00 

Goldstein, Alexander, 16 California. . 300.00 

Goldstein, Mrs. H., 1270 McAllister.. 6.00 

Goldstein, Henry, 136 Pine 6.00 

Goldstein, Mr. and Mrs. Sanford L., 

120 Market 600.00 



134 



1915 1916 

Goldstein, Mrs. William, Hotel Nor- 

mandie 32.00 

Goldstone, Jacob, 323 Market 21.00 

Goldstone, Kenry, Geary & Grant Av. 12.00 

Goldstone, Mr. and Mrs. Moses A., 

323 Market 18.00 

Goldtree, M. N., 37 Battery 20.00 

Gollober, Julius, 132 Pine 50.00 

Goodf riend, I., 245 Powell 18.00 

Goodman, Mr. and Mrs. A., 827 Brod- 

erick 15.00 

Goodman, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac, 879 

Market 18.00 

Goodman, Isidore, 15 Stockton 20.00 

Goodman, L. F., Rm. 321, Pacific Bid. 6.00 

Goodman, Mrs. Louis, 2878 Wash... 25.00 

Goodman, Mrs. S. B., 121 Jordan Av. 50.00 

Goodman, Mrs. Rachel S., Hotel Nor- 

mandie 12.00 

Gordan, Raphael, Rm. 317, Chronicle 

Bldg 75.00 

Gordan, Sol, 1627 Sutter 9.00 

Gordon, Philip, 15 Battery 25.00 

Gorflnkle, Mrs. Jacob, 1329 Laguna. . 6.00 

Goslinsky, Phil E., 747 Sansome 25.00 

Goslinsky, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 747 

Sansome 50.00 

Gottlieb, Paul, 1561 Pine 3.00 

Gottlob, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob J., Co- 
lumbia Theater 250.00 

Gradwohl, Mrs. R. J., 1353 Scott 3.00 

Green, Isador, 2515 Clay 6.00 

Green, Mark, 9 Main 100.00 

Green, Mr. and Mrs. Walter A., 112 

Kearny 100.00 

Greenbaum, Will L. and Miss Ida, 

101 Post 25.00 .... 

Greenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham 

H., 1409 Ellis 15.00 

Greenberg, J., 3314 Mission 3.00 

Greenberg, Jacob. 1640 Fillmore 10.00 

Greenberg, Joseph, 1233 Golden Gate 

Ave 12.00 

Greenberg, Mrs. Joseph, 2293 Frank- 
lin 50.00 

Greenberg, Maurice S., 225 Beale 10.00 

Greenberg, Sam, 914 Buchanan 6.00 

Greenebaum, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred, 10 

Main 100.00 

Greenebaum, Mr. and Mrs. Emil, 227 

Post 200.00 

Greenebaum, Joseph L., care Pragers, 

Jones and Market. 50.00 

Greenebaum, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, 310 

Sansome 60.00 

Greenebaum, Mrs. Rosalie, 310 San- 
some 25.00 

Greenebaum, Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund, 

Sansome and Sutter 250.00 

Greenebaum, Mr. and Mrs. William, 

740 Mission 100.00 

Greenewald, Mrs. Louisa, 310 San- 
some 1,000.00 

Greenhood, Mr. and Mrs. Carl, 3442 

Clay 10.00 25.00 

Greenstein, P., 100 Sanchez 8.00 



135 



1915 1916 

Greenzweig, Mr. and Mrs. George, 

525 Market 30.00 

Greenzweig, Henry G., 1£>0 Post 15.00 

Gross, Jeffrey, Stockton & O'Farrell. 12.00 

Groeschel, Albert, 420 Cherry 6.00 

Gross, Max, 49 Sansome 6.00 

Grunauer, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, 103 
Front 18.00 

Guggenhime, Mr. and Mrs. Berthold, 
100 California 125.00 

Guggenhime, Mr. and Mrs. David J., 
100 California 250.00 

Guggenhime, Mr. and Mrs. Leon, 
Room 350 Mills Bldg 500.00 

Gump, Mr. and Mrs. A. L., 24G Post.. 39.00 

Gump, Mr. & Mrs. Alfred S., 268 Post 50.00 

Gump, William E., 246 Post 25.00 

Gundelfinger, Mrs. Louis, 2201 Cala- 
veras St., Fresno, Cal 5.00 

Gunst, Mr. and Mrs. Morgan A., 
California and Front 500.00 

Gunst, Mr. and Mrs. Moses A., Cali- 
fornia and Front 2,500.00 

Gutstadt, H., 150 Pine 6.00 

Gunzburger, Dr. B. M., 1933 Ellis 6.00 

Gunzburger, Emil, 1933 Ellis 12.00 

Gunzburger, H. L., 519 California 6.00 

Gurslicht, S., 1862 Fillmore 6.00 

Guttman, S. L., 1689 Church 6.00 

Gyle, A. R., 49 Sansome 10.00 



Haas, Abraham, 200 Davis 1,500.00 

Haas, Mrs. Abraham, 200 Davis 100.00 

Haas, Charles W., 200 Davis 200.00 

Haas, Fred R., 310 Sansome 12.00 

Haas, Louis S., Beale and Mission... 100.00 

Haas, Madeline, 3778 Washington 50.00 

Haas, Walter A., 200 Davis 100.00 200.00 

Haas, Mr. & Mrs, Wm., 200 Davis. . .1,500.00 

Haber, Mrs. Ferdinand A., 85 Jordan 
Ave 30.00 

Haber, Mrs. F. C, Hotel Clift 150.00 

Haber, Harold, 3555 Jackson 25.00 

Haber, Henri F., 444 Market 5.00 

Haber, Joseph, Jr., 1211 Flood Bldg. 100.00 

Haber, Mr. & Mrs. Louis Ferdinand, 

444 Market 30.00 

Haber, Miss Ruth, 85 Jordan Ave... 10.00 

Haber, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel B., 2459 
Jackson 50.00 

Haber, Dr. Wm. J., 177 Post 25.00 

Haines, Henry, 997 Market 6.00 

Hamburger, Aaron, 114 Sansome 12.00 

Hamburger, D., 114 Sansome 25.00 

Hamburger, Mr. & Mrs. H., 3990 Clay 75.00 100.00 

Hanak, Mr. and Mrs. I., 135 Kearny 25.00 

Harris, Mrs. Carrie, 1899 California.. 18.00 

Harris, Mrs. Eleanor K., 2154 Vir- 
ginia St., Berkeley, Cal 50.00 

Harris, Mr. and Mrs. Charles, 2111 
Jackson 25.00 

Harris, Isaac, 250 Kearny 20.00 



136 



1915 1916 

Harris, Mr. & Mrs. Oscar, 2066 Sutter 15.00 ..... 

Harris, Silas, 100 California 10.00 

Harshall, Abraham, Rm. 225, Crocker 

Bids 24.00 

Hart, Mr. & Mrs. Benno, 71 Sansome 250.00 

Hart, Mr. & Mrs. Henry H., Room 

415 City Hall 12.00 

Hart, Mr. & Mrs. Julien, 71 Sansome 200.00 

Hartman, Paul, 112 Market 20.00 

Harzfeld, Fanny, Hotel Normandie.. 6.00 

Hausmann, Mr. and Mrs. Siegfried, 

3034 Jackson 60.00 

Hecht, Alice A., Room 1001, 310 San- 
some 350.00 

Hecht, Bert R., Rm. 707, Kohl Bldg. 400.00 

Hecht, Miss Edith, 2518 Fillmore.... 150.00 

Hecht, Elias M., Rm. 706, Kohl Bldg. 200.00 

Hecht, Mrs. Helen, Rm. 707, Kohl 

Building 150.00 

Hecht, Mr. and Mrs. Joel K., Rm. 

708 Kohl Bldg 200.00 

Heilbron, Mrs. Louis, 1528 Sutter... 6.00 

Heilbronner, August, Room 517, Kohl 

Building 25.00 

Heilbronner, Mrs. August, Room 517, 

Kohl Bldg 25.00 

Heineberg, Joseph, 24 California 18.00 

Heineberg, Mr. and Mrs. J. A., 24 

California 20.00 

Heineman, H. M., 130 Bush 6.00 

Helbing, David A., 451 Mission 25.00 

Heller, Mrs. Belle, Hotel Fairmont.. 70.00 75.00 

Heller, Charles L., 733 Market 6.00 

Heller, Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel S., 

Nevada Bank Bldg 750.00 

Heller, Leonard G., Hotel Fairmont 20.00 25.00 
Heller, Mr. and Mrs. Moses, 41 San- 
some 500.00 

Heller, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel W., 

Room 365 Mills Bldg 600.00 

Heller, Sigmund M., 41 Sansome 250.00 

Hellman, Isaias W., Welle Fargo 

Nevada Bank 4000.00 5000.00 

Hellman, Mr. and Mrs. I. W., Jr., 

Union Trust Co 1500.00 2000.00 

Henderson, Mrs. Esther G., Hotel 

Richelieu 250.00 

Henderson, Miss Sarita D., Hotel 

Richelieu 72.00 

Henry, Mrs. Joe, 1115 Steiner 3.00 

Herman, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, 2396 

Mission 12.00 

Herscowitz, M., 411 North Main, 

Fort Bragg 15.00 

Hershberg, J. L., 310 Sansome 20.00 25.00 

Hertz, Mr. & Mrs. Louis, 149 Calif. 25.00 

Herzberg, B., 1026 Fillmore 12.00 

Herzog, Mr. & Mrs. Max, San Rafael 50.00 

Herzog, Mr. and Mrs. Siegfried K., 

San Rafael 100.00 

Hess, Minna, 2914 Clay 10.00 

Heyman, Alvin, 742 Market 150.00 

Heyman, Kurt, 154 Sutter 12.00 

Heyman, Sir Henry, 434 Spruce 10.00 

Heyman, Mrs. Lina, 742 Market 75.00 

Heyman, Oscar, 742 Market 150.00 



137 



1915 1916 

Heyman, Mr. & Mrs. Samuel, 720 

Mission 40.00 

Heyneman, Mrs. Lionel, 2721 Clay... 75.00 

Heyneman, W. R., 3452 Jackson 100.00 

Hilp, Harry H., Jr., 55 Montgomery 6.00 

Hilp, Mr. & Mrs. Henry, 1350 Sutter 15.00 

Himmelstern, Robert Jack, 297 First 

Avenue 6.00 

Himmelstern, Mrs. Leo, 166 Com- 
monwealth Ave 6.00 

Hines, Mr. and Mrs. Gabriel, Room 

718, Head Bldg 125.00 150.00 

Hines, Miss Rose Margaret, Room 

718 Head Bldg 20.00 25.00 

Hirsch, Arthur Z. t 1819 Washington. 50.00 

Hirsch, Mr. and Mrs. Charles, 1819 

Washington 150.00 

Hirsch, David, 245 Montgomery 15.00 

Hirsch, E., 616 Front 3.00 

Hirsch, Ernest, 145 Columbus Ave... 12.00 

Hirsch, Henry, 720 Baker 6.00 

Hirsch, Joseph, 949 Kearny 50.00 

Hirsch, Mr. and Mrs. Leopold, 2418 

Broadway 25.00 

Hirsch, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 1387 

Hayes 12.00 

Hirschfeld, Mr. and Mrs. Albert, Pine 

and Battery 50.00 

Hirschfeld, Charles, Room 243 Russ 

Building 50.00 

Hirschfeld, H., 243 Carl 6.00 

Hirschfeld, Mrs. Yetta, 3370 Wash- 
ington 25.00 

Hirschfelder, Dr. and Mrs. J. O., 

1392 Geary 100.00 

Hirschfelder, Mr. and Mrs. Sam, 519 

Market 50.00 

Hirschler, Mr. and Mrs. David, 2705 

California 75.00 

Hirschler, Mr. and Mrs. Edward, 

care Concordia Club 100.00 

Hirschman, Adolph, 220 Grant Ave.. 25.00 

Hirschman, Mr. and Mrs. Marion, 

220 Grant Ave 25.00 

Hochheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Amiel, 

Room 820 Merchants' Ex. Bldg 75.00 

Hochheimer, Mrs. Moses, 101 W. 

Sycamore, Willows, Gal 40.00 

Hochwald, A., 2211 Bush 3.00 

Hodes, Simon, 117 Grant Ave 6.00 

Hofman, Mr. and Mrs. I. L., 2727 

Clay 50.00 

Hoffman. Mrs. Abe, 1663 McAllister... 6.00 

Hoffman, H. H., 135 Kearny 12.00 

Hoffman, Mrs. J., 775 Post 6.00 

Hoffman, Dr. Lawrence H., Rm. 539 

Butler Bldg., 12.00 

Hoffman, Samuel. 2247 Mission 6.00 

Hoffman, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar, 112 

Market 50.00 

Hoffman, Sol, 1552 Webster 3.00 

Honigsberger, Mrs. A., 1631 Clay 6.00 

Horvitz, L., 142 Sansome 6.00 

Hotaling, Mrs. Ella K., Room 1134 

Merchants' Exchange Bldg 50.00 

Hyman, Harold Mark, 2230 Sacto 12.00 



138 



1915 1916 
Hyman, Mrs. Henry W., Hotel St. 

Francis 100.00 

Hyman, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph, Room 

610 Kohl Bldg 300.00 

Hyman, Mr. and Mrs. Morris, Room 

610 Kohl Bldg 300.00 

Hyman, Robert Henry, Hotel St. 

Francis . 25.00 

Hyman, Samuel Lane, South Bend, 

Washington 6.00 

Hyman, Samuel Lightner, Kohl Bldg. 12.00 

Hyman, Dr. Sol, 135 Stockton 75.00 

Hyman, Walter G., Taylor & Beach. 25.00 

Hyman, Wm. L., 18th and Bryant 25.00 



I 

Ickelheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 

439 Sutter 60.00 

Isaac, Mr. and Mrs. Chas., 29 Kearny 75.00 

Isaacs, Abe, 756 Market 6.00 

Isaacs, Mr. and Mrs. Josh D. f 32 

Battery 50.00 

Israel, Miss Dora T., 1937 Golden 

Gate Ave 3.00 

Israel, Mr. and Mrs. Meyer, 1500 

Sutter 40.00 



J 

Jacob, Andrew A., 753 Market 50.00 

Jacob, Henry, 234 Pine 6.00 

Jacob, Mr. and Mrs. Henry R., 753 

Market 50.00 

Jacob, Leopold, 1616 O'Farrell 50.00 

Jacob, Nathan, 24 Battery 100.00 

Jacob, Samuel, 366 6th Ave 25.00 

Jacobi, A. Leonard, Room 615, Grape 

Growers' Bldg 30.00 

Jacobi, Alexander, 513 Sixth 10.00 

jacobi, Frederick (in memory of)... 100.00 

Jacobi, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob J., 116 

Main 250.00 

Jacobi, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M., 25 

Kearny 12.50 

Jacobi, Leonard, 116 Main 15.00 

Jacobi, Michael, 116 Main 6.00 

Jacobs, Abraham, 316 Battery 3.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. Carrie, 860 Sutter 24.00 25.00 

Jacobs, Charles S., 114 Sansome 15.00 

Jacobs, Edwin M., 2433 Franklin 6.00 

Jacobs, Mr. and Mrs. Frank P., Room 

602 First National Bank Bldg 20.00 

Jacobs, George T., 15 Stockton 6.00 

Jacobs, Mr. and Mrs. Henry A., 

Humboldt Bank Bldg 50.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. H., 3370 Clay 3.00 

Jacobs, Henry, 18th and Minnesota.. 6.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. Henry, 1200 California.. 6.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. Hyman, 2433 Franklin.. 25.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. I. H., 2037 Scott 50.00 

Jacobs, Isidor, 600 Minnesota 27.00 

Jacobs, Mr. and Mrs. J., 1734 Gough. 50.00 

Jacobs, Joseph, 114 Sansome 6.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. Joseph, 114 Sansome... 6.00 



139 



1915 1916 

Jacobs, Miss L., 644 Market 3.00 

Jacobs, Mr. and Mrs. Leslie L., 11 

Battery 25.00 

Jacobs, Nathan, 405 O'Farrell 6.00 

Jacobs, Miss Rebecca, Hotel Granada 12.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. Walter Z., 114 Sansome 6.00 

Jacobs, William P., 114 Sansome 10.00 

Jacobson, Mrs. Harry, Hotel Dor- 
chester 15.00 

Jacobson, Samuel, 75 Folsom 3.00 

Jacoby, Mrs. Mathilde, Pacific and 

Sansome 100.00 

Jacoby, Mr. and Mrs. Philip I., Pa- 
cific and Sansome 50.00 

Jacoby, Samuel, Pacific and Sansome 25.00 

Jerusalem, H., Visalia, Cal 50.00 

Jewell, Mrs. Melanie, 1958 Vallejo... 12.00 

Joel, Arthur, Room 620 Mills Bldg. . 30.00 

Jonas, Mr. and Mrs. A., Hotel Oak- 
land, Oakland 50.00 

Jonas, Isidore, 1728 Fillmore 10.00 

Judis, Mr. and Mps. Alphonse, 704 
Market 100.00 



K 



Kahn, Albert, 16 California 10.00 

Kahn, Emile E. f 742 Market 50.00 

Kahn, Fred H., 644 Market 10.00 

Kahn, Frederick, P. O. Box 396, 

Oakland, Cal 100.00 

Kahn, Mr. & Mrs. Geo. H., 34 Kearny 54.00 

Kahn, Mr. & Mrs. Henry, 644 Market 60.00 

Kahn, Mr. & Mrs. Ira, 482 California 100.00 

Kahn, Jesse, 3518 Sacramento 6.00 

Kahn, Mr. & Mrs. Joseph, 308 Bush.. 50.00 ..... 

Kahn, Solomon, 334 Market 9.00 

Kahn, Mrs. Solomon, 3014 Washing- 
ton 6.00 

Kaiser, L. M., 232 Maple 50.00 

Kalischer, S. E., 17 Sansome 5.00 

Kalisky, Fred, 3900 Seventeenth 3.00 

Kalisky, Mrs. Flora. 3017 Jackson... 10.00 

Kalisky, Mrs. S., 2695 California 15.00 

Kant, M. D., 110 Clay 9.00 

Kanter, Henry, Rm. 378 Monadnock 

Building 12.00 

Kaplan, Isaac, 1546 Divisadero 6.00 

Kaplan, Max, 1546 Divisadero 6.00 

Karski, A. C, Rm. 631 Pacific Bldg. . 1.00 

Karsky, Mr. and Mrs. Morris, 37 

Battery 20.00 

Kasper, Abraham H., 720 Mission... 9.00 ..... 

T*-nt?rhin*ki, Be^^H. *°5 Market... 125.00 

Katten, Mr. and Mrs. Simon, 49 San- 
some 150.00 200.00 

Katz, Bert, 100 California 20.00 

Katz, Sam, 442 Vicksburg 6.00 

Kauffman, E., 740 Mission 25.00 

Kauffman, Mr. and Mrs. Leon, 740 

Mission 250.00 

Kaufmann, Adolph, 121 Grant Ave... 25.00 

Kaufmahn, Joel W., Hotel St. Francis 10.00 



140 



1915 1916 

Kaufmann, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice J., 

121 Grant Ave 50.00 

Kaufmann, Moses F., 121 Grant Ave. 25.00 

Kaufman, Felix, 165 Post 12.00 

Kaufman, Mrs. Rosalie, 2421 Wash.. 5.00 

Kaufman, Mrs. Sophie, 721 Willow 

Ave 3.00 

Kaufmann, Mr. William, The Em- 
porium 500.00 

Keilus, Mrs. Chas., 2415 Washington 7.50 

Keesing, Mrs. Hannah, 349 Thirty- 
fourth, Oakland 17.00 

Kierski, Mr. and Mrs. Fred W., 821 

Market 25.00 

Kissel, I. R., 1723 Polk 25.00 

Klein, Mr. and Mrs. Lazare, 41 San- 
some 125.00 

Klein, Saul D., 100 California 6.00 

Kline, Mrs. A., 155 Tenth Ave 3.00 

Kline, Mr. and Mrs. David, 135 Bush 50.00 

Kline, Mrs. George A., 1701 Bush... 12.00 

Klinger, Mr. and Mrs. William, 120 

Lyon 10.00 

Koblick, Mr. and Mrs. Harry, 976 Mc- 
Allister 12.00 

Koenig, Max, 125 Geary 10.00 

Koenigsberger, Ferdinand, 213 E St., 

San Rafael 12.00 

Kohlberg, Alfred, Rm. 906 Pacific 

Bldg., 10.00 

Kohlberg, Mrs. B. F., Hotel Granada 6.00 

Kohlberg, Herman, Hotel Bellevue.. 50.00 

Kohlberg, Mr. and Mrs. Manfred S., 

Room 906, Pacific Bldg 50.00 

Kohn, Mrs. George A., 2110 Scott 50.00 

Kohn, Mr. and Mrs. Simon, 2741 Clay 100.00 

Korn, Eugene, 15 Kearny 24.00 

Koshland, Jesse, 110 Market 6.00 

Koshland, Joseph, 110 Market 6.00 

Koshland, Max I., Rm. 12, Mills Bldg. 25.00 

Koshland, Mr. and Mrs. Marcus S., 110 

Market 1,500.00 

Kraemer, Mr. and Mrs. Sanford J., 

3572 Jackson 50.00 

Kragen, Samuel, 1524 Dolores 23.00 25.00 

Kramer, Samuel, 166 Geary 9.00 

Kroeber, Mrs. A. L., in memory of.. 6.00 

Krotozyner, Dr. and Mrs. Martin, 

995 Sutter 75.00 

Kuh, Louis, 57 Sansome 50.00 

Kullman, Adele S., 2915 Jackson 3.00 

Kullman, Jacob, Wells Fargo Bldg. . 100.00 

Kutner, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham L., 

112 Market 50.00 

Kutner, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred L., Rm. 

612, Merchants' Exchange Bldg... 200.00 

Kutner, Mrs. Caroline. Rm. 612 Mer- 
chants' Exchange Bldg.. 250.00 

Kutner. Mrs. L.. 1402 O'Farrell 20.00 

Kutz, Mrs. G. M., 2741 Clay 20.00 

Kutz, Jesse W., 245 Montgomery 10.00 

Kutz, William J., 122 Front 10.00 



Label, Jacob, 1435 Octavia 6.00 

Lacher, Lester, 16 California 25.00 



141 



1915 1916 



Lachman, Mr. & Mrs. Arthur, Alameda 

& Newhall Sts., San Jose, Cal 50.00 

Lachman, Edward and Gustav, 2019 

Mission 50.00 

Lachman, Estate of S. (Albert and 

Henry), 417 Market 650.00 

Lande, David, 1720 Golden Gate Ave. 3.00 

Lang:, Albert G., 219 Drumm 20.00 

Langendorf, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard, 

1136 McAllister 36.00 

Langer, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 600 

Divisadero 50.00 

Langerman, Albert L, Sutter and 

Sansome 100.00 

Lansburgh, G. Albert, 709 Mission... 50.00 
Lansburgh, S. Laz, care The Or- 

pheum 2-5.00 

Lapidare, Mrs. E., 2572 California. . . 6.00 

Lasky, M. C., 814 Market 3.00 

Latz, H. L., 154 Sutter 6.00 

Latz, Phil, Modesto, Cal 24.00 

Latz, S. M., 558 Market 6.00 

Lavenson, Mr. and Mrs. Albert S., 

657 Walsworth Ave., Oakland, Cal. 100.00 
Lavenson, Miss Sara, 673 Walsworth 

Ave., Oakland 6.00 

Leavy, Franklin M., Orpheum Thea- 
ter 5.00 

Laventhal, Isadore, 553 Mission 30.00 

Lazarus, Harry, care The White Hse. 10.00 

Lazarus, Milton, 138A Fillmore 6.00 

Leavy, Clarence M., 99 Beale 15.00 

Lederman, Mr. and Mrs. J. Delmore, 

Flat Iron Bldg 50.00 

Lederman, Dr. and Mrs. Emanuel D., 

38 Presidio Terrace 100.00 

LefTman, David, 149 California 25.00 

Leffman, Sigmund T., 149 California. 25.00 
Lefkovitch, Joshua, Vista Grande, 

California . . . 3.00 

Lengfeld, Mrs. A. L., 1822 Sacramento 250.00 
Lengfeld, Mrs. Bella, care The Em- 
press 3.00 

Lengfeld, Dr. Felix, 272 Post 25.00 

Lengfeld, Joseph L., 272 Post 6.00 

Lengfeld, Louis, 272 Post 20.00 

Lenoir, Fanny, 2975 Clay 6.00 

Lerer, Joseph, 381 Eleventh 24.00 

Lesser, Mr. and Mrs. Harry, 58 2d.. 100.00 
Leszvnsky, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham, 

2010 Webster 25.00 

Leszynsky, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 

3267 Jackson 25.00 

Leszynsky, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel L., 

154 Sutter 100.00 

Letter, Mrs. Hannah, 3837 Clay 20.00 

Levenson, Samuel M., Alaska Com- 
mercial Bldg 50.00 

Leventritt, Mr. and Mrs. Marion. 

Hotel St. Francis 200.00 

Levi, Henry, 10 Main 50.00 

Levi, Mr. and Mrs. Herman, 111 New 

Montgomery 500.00 

Levi, I. Charles, 135 Kearny 25.00 

Levi, Milton J., Ill New Montgomery 100.00 



142 



1915 1916 

Levin, Herman, 1803 Fillmore 25.00 

Levin, Louis, 1803 Fillmore 6.00 

Levin, Max, 1062 Folsom 6.00 

Levingston, H., 135 Kearny 12.00 

Levinson, Herman, 555 Brannan 6.00 

Levison, Dr. Charles G., 516 Sutter.. 100.00 

Levison, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob B., 401 

California 300.00 

Levison, L. O., 704 Market 50.00 

Levison, R. J., 245 Post 12.00 

Levit, A. E., 25 Sansome 12.00 

Levy, Adolph, Washington and Davis 12.00 

Levy, Mrs. Belle, 2409 Scott 50.00 

Levy, Mrs. Bertha, 1915 Mariposa, 

Fresno, Cal 6.00 

Levy, Charles, 682 Grove 3.00 

Levy, David L., Rm. 659 Mills Bldg. 5.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. David A., 3812 

California 15.00 

Levy, Mrs. E. M., 2127 Howard 3.00 

Levy, Emile, 733 Market 100.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene W., Mills 

Building 15.00 

Levy, Mrs. Fanny, 250 Grand Ave., 

„ Oakland, Cal 6.00 

Levy, Mrs. Francis J., 1856 Sutter. . . 6.00 

Levy, Mrs. Henrietta, 133A Carl 6.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Henry, 583 Mkt. 12.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Henry, 53 Third. 15.00 

Levy, Henry R., 606 Walsworth Ave., 

Oakland, Cal 6.00 

Levy, H. J., 704 Market 6.00 

Levy, Mr. & Mrs. Henry, 45 Kearny.. 75.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert, 136 5th. 100.00 ..... 

Levy, Isaac, Hotel Fairmont 25.00 

Levy, I. W., Room 701, 110 Sutter... 50.00 

Levy, Mrs. Jeane, 2931 Clay 3.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Jules, 733 Mkt.. 250.00 

Levy, Lambert, 2931 Clay 3.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Leon G., 733 

Market 75.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, 3936 Clay. 50.00 

Levy, Louis, 580 33d St., Oakland 6.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, 1230 Polk 21.00 

Levy, Rev. M. S., Mr. and Mrs., 1901 

Pierce 24.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Marcus, 515 Mkt. 10.00 

Levy, Mrs. Mary A., 510 13th Ave... 6.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Max, 135 Kearny 50.00 

Levy, Max H., 57 Battery 15.00 

Levy, Melville S., 255 California 6.00 

Levy. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer H., 436 

O'Farrell 60.00 

Levy, Morris. 50 Sansome 27.00 

Levy, Mrs. Morris, 1350 Sutter 9.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Moses L., 704 

'Market 50.00 

Lew, Mrs. Raphael, Hotel Richelieu. 6.00 

Levy, Robert B., 316 Battery 6.00 

Lpvv, Sam H., 177 Post 3.00 

Levv, S. W., 255 California 100.00 

Levy, Victor H.. 733 Market 12.00 

Levy, Dr. William H., Physicians' 

Bldg 9.00 

Lewald, Mrs. Rose, 2556 Post 6.00 

Lewald, Sanford G., 2036 O'Farrell.. 33.00 

Lewin, Arthur, 1547 Larkin 50.00 



143 



1915 1916 

Lewin, Helmut, 928 Market 10.00 

Lewin, Leon, 100 Front 200.00 

Lewis, Edgar S., Rm. 920 Shreve Bid. 25.00 

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel, 3145 

Washing-ton 12.00 

Lewis, Mrs. Isabella, 2519 Pacific Av. 150.00 

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. Wm., 255 Calif.. 50.00 

Lewkovitz, Abraham, 1815 Webster.. 6.00 

Lezinsky, Mr. and Mrs. Edward, 154 

Sutter 75.00 

Lezinsky, Mr. and Mrs. Fred L., 704 

Market 50.00 

Liberman, Meyer, 124 Georgia, Val- 

lejo, Cal 6.00 

Lichtenstein, Arthur S., 1483 McAl- 
lister 15.00 

Lichtenstein, Mr. and Mrs. Benj. H., 

Locust St., San Rafael 120.00 

Lichtenstein, Harry M., 24 New 

Montgomery 6.00 

Lichtenstein, Joy, 125 Leidesdorff. . . 20.00 

Lichtenstein, Mrs. T., 2722 Sutter 25.00 

Liebenthal, Mr. and Mrs. Albert, 1629 

Broadway 20.00 

Liebert, Mrs. B., 295 Page 6.00 

Liebes, Arnold, 175 Post 25.00 

Liebes, Mr. and Mrs. Ben, 177 Post.. 50.00 

Liebes, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac, 177 Post 300.00 500.00 

Liebes, Mr. and Mrs. Julien, 177 Post. 150.00 

Liebes, Leon I., 1814 Pacific Ave 100.00 

Liebmann, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice, 

3362 Clay 500.00 

Liebes, Mrs. Sydney, Hotel Riche- 
lieu 100.00 

Lilienthal, Arthur G., 310 Sansome... 50.00 

Lilienthal, Benj. P., 310 Sansome 100.00 

Lilienthal, Mrs. Bertha G., 310 San- 
some 200.00 

Lilienthal, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest R., 

310 Sansome 125.00 

Lilienthal, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse W., 

Room 1206 Flood Bldg 500.00 

Lilienthal, Mr. and Mrs. J. W., Jr., 

Sutter and Sansome 100.00 125.00 

Lilienthal, Max P., Anglo- California 

Trust Co 50.00 

Lilienthal, Philip N., 1 Sansome 50.00 100.00 

Lilienthal, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 310 

Sansome 60.00 

Lilienthal, Mrs. Sophie, care Anglo- 
California Trust Co 250.00 

Lindner, Carolyn, 436 O'Farrell 6.00 

Lindow, Mrs. W. J., 1309 Hyde 5.00 

Lipman, Henry, 85 Post 6.00 

Lipman, Mr. & Mrs. Louis, 321 Bush 150.00 

Lippitt, Philip, Room 903, Nevada 

Bank Bldg 50.00 

Lippitt, Mr. and Mrs. Sydney, 664 

Market 60.00 

Lippman, Georg-e M., Room 846 Pa- 
cific Bldg" 3.00 

Lippman, Mrs. Hyman, corner 22d 

and Mission 100.00 

Lippman, Mr. and Mrs. Julien, cor- 
ner 22d and Mission 25.00 



144 



1915 1916 
Lippman, Marion H., cor. 22d and 

Mission 12.00 

Lisberger, D. S., 127 Montgomery 25.00 

Livingston, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin, 

114 Sansome 12.00 

Livingston, David, Grant Ave. and 

Geary 100.00 

Livingston, Mrs. D., Hotel Richelieu 3.00 

Livingston, Edw., Grant Ave. and 

Geary 100.00 

Livingston, Mrs. M. A., 1842 Golden 

Gate Ave 6.00 

Livingston, Philip H., 612 Haight... 12.00 

Lobe, Mrs. Justine, 1478 California.. 6.00 

Lobree, Mrs. Allan A., 1500 McAl- 
lister 12.00 

Lobree, Mrs. Lizzie, 1343 McAllister 25.00 

Loeb, Albert L, Rm. 816, Crocker 

Bldg 25.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Dahlia, 860 Sutter 24.00 

Loeb, Mrs. Jeanne tte, Hotel Richelieu 10.00 

Loewenstein, Mr. and Mrs. H., 3526 

Washington 50.00 

Loewenstein, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice 

F., 310 California 150.00 

Loewi, William, Rm. 543 Pacific Bid. 6.00 

Loewy, Edmund, 119 Bush 30.00 

Loewy, Fred, 119 Bush 6.00 

Loewy, William, 201 Sansome 100.00 

Louisson, Edward B., 742 Market 25.00 

Louisson, Mrs. Morris, 1069 E. South 

Temple, Salt Lake City 15.00 

Loverich, Mrs. Sadie, 110 Geary 11.00 

Lowenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Isador, Rm. 

615, Hearst Bldg 250.00 

Lowengrund, Mr. and Mrs. Lee, 144 

Twelfth 50.00 

Lowenstein, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard, 

Kearny and Sutter 100.00 250.00 

Lowenstein, Joseph, 1539 Fillmore.. 6.00 

Lowenstein, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 

200 Kearny 50.00 

Lowenthal, William H., 34 First 25.00 

Lubliner, C. W., 136 Eddy 6.00 

M 

Machol, Eugene, 1070 Post 20.00 

Mack, Adolph, Room 350 Mills Bldg. 500.00 

Mack, Harold L., 242 Montgomery 100.00 

Mack, Jules J., Rm. 350, Mills Bldg.. 500.00 

Mack, Nettie, in memory of, Mills 

Bldg 100.00 

Magner Brothers, 419 Jackson 20.00 

Magner, Joseph, 40 California 100.00 

Magnes, Mrs. Eliza, 48 Second 36.00 

Magnes, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel D., 142 

Sansome 50.00 

Magnin, Grover A., Grant Ave. and 

Geary 87.50 

Magnin, Mrs. Isidore, Grant Ave. 

and Geary 250.00 

Magnin, Sam, Geary and Grant Ave. 50.00 

Mamlar, Nathan, 253 Church 9.00 

Manasse, Nathan, 602 California 40.00 

Mandel, Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel, 1392 

Geary 100.00 

Mandel, Frank, 1392 Geary 6.00 



145 



1915 1916 

Manheim, Fred, 178 O'Farrell 6.00 

Manheim, Mr. and Mrs. Henry S., 

453 Montgomery 200.00 

Mann, David, 1111 Geary 6.00 

Manson, Mrs. Olga Sutro, 3386 Wash- 
ington 25.00 

Marcus, Aaron, 3314 Mission 3.00 

Marcus, Gustav, 704 Market 100.00 

Marcus, L. J., Pacific Bldg 3.00 

Marcus, Mrs. R. F., 1014 Larkin 10.00 

Marcuse, Mrs. M., 2430 Clay 3.00 

Marks, Mrs. Johanna, 2900 Jackson.. 10.00 

Marks, Joseph, 2336 Lake 21.00 

Marks, Milton, Hobart Bldg 12.00 

Marks, Mr. & Mrs. Wm., 831 Market 50.00 

Marx, Daniel, 151 Post 25.00 

Marx, Mr. and Mrs. Melville, Colum- 
bia Theater 100.00 

Mauser, Henry, 150 24th Ave 15.00 

Mauser, Mrs. Henry, 150 24th Ave.... 10.00 

May, Aaron, 222 Sansome 20.00 

Mayer, Mr. and Mrs. Henry L., 3750 

Clay 100.00 

Mayer, Morris, Rm. 401, 717 Market.. 30.00 ..... 

Mayer, Nate, 41 Sansome 50.00 

Meertief, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham, 200 

Davis 200.00 

Meller. M., 1544 Divisadero 6.00 

Meininger, Mrs. Emma R., 3765 Clay 20.00 

Mendelson, Mrs. Julius, 1622 McAl- 
lister 12.00 

Mendelson, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, 908 

Buchanan 12.00 

Mendessolle, Evelyn, 1931 Jackson. . . 12.00 

Metzger, Louis, 58 2d 500.00 

Meyberg, Leo J., 49 Geary 6.00 

Meyer, Abe, 8 Hollis 6.00 

Meyer, Albert, 244 Pine 1,500.00 

Meyer, Benjamin F., 114 Sansome. . . 50.00 

Meyer, Charles, care Kaskel & Kas- 
kel, S. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 33rd, 

New York, 15.00 

Meyer, Charles, 2109 Baker 12.00 

Meyer, Dr. Henry, 240 Stockton 21.00 

Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. Henry, 244 Pine 500.00 

Meyer, Henry G., Rm. 627 Mills Bid. 100.00 

Meyer, Jacob, Room 303, Monadnock 

Bldg 12.00 

Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. Julian, 244 Pine 25.00 

Meyer, Mrs. Leopold C, 2549 Laguna 3.00 

Meyer, Mrs. Marcus C, 1703 Jackson 20.00 

Meyer, Rev. and Mrs. Martin A., 

2109 Baker 200.00 

Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. Moritz, 244 Pine 500.00 

Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. Moses O., 530 

Davis 25.00 

Meyer, Percy J., 359 Sutter 12.00 

Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. Sam, 637 Mills 

Bldg. . ... 50.00 

Meyer, Samuel, 1561 Fillmore 5.00 

Mever, Samuel O., 530 Davis 50.00 

Meyer, Mrs. Sarah, 8 Hollis 6.00 

Meyer, Simon, 244 Pine 75.00 

Meyerfeld, Jesse, Room 571, Monad- 
nock Bldg 25.00 

Meyerfeld, Mr. and Mrs. Morris, care 

The Orpheum 1250.00 

Meyers tein, Alfred L., Metropolis 

Bank Bldg., 300.00 

146 



1915 1916 

Meyerstein, Mrs. Lewis, 1901 Frank- 
lin 250.00 

Michael, Mrs. Helena, 1902 Sutter... 6.00 

Michael, Morris, 127 Montgomery... 6.00 

Michels, Mr. and Mrs. Leopold, 740 

Mission 300.00 

Mihlstein, Jacob, 976 McAllister 6.00 

Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Aaron, Los 

Altos, Cal. 25.00 

Mish, Gerald, 154 Sutter 12.00 

Mish, Mrs. Sarah, 425 Divisadero 21.00 

Mish, Sol G., Palace Hotel 12.00 

Mitau, Mr.& Mrs. Morris, 930 Market 200.00 

Mitchell, Samuel J., 405 Cherry 12.00 

Mitchell, Mrs. Samuel J., 405 Cherry 6.00 

Mohr, S., 150 Post 3.00 

Mohr, M., 77 O'Farrell 6.00 

Monasch, Herman, 1533 Octavia 12.00 

Moore, Leopold P., London 21.00 

Morris, Henry, 1640 Washington 12.00 

Morris, Leon E., First Nat. Bank 

Bldg 12.00 

Morris, Mr. and Mrs. Max M., 1430 

Larkin 25.00 

Moses, Sigmund H., 49 Sansome 10.00 

Moss, Mrs. Bertha, 3324 Washington 6.00 

Moss, Mr. and Mrs. Herman, 24 Cal. 25.00 

Moss, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac, Room 304 

Merchants' Exchange Bldg 200.00 

Mund, Leo, 4629 California 12.00 

Munter, Carl, 3392 Clay 12.00 

Munter, Mrs. Leo, 117 Beulah 6.00 

Musin, Ephraim H., 57 Third 27.00 

Myers, Mrs. Etta Friedman, Gra- 
nada Hotel 10.00 

Myers, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence A., 

Hillsborough, San Mateo Co., Cal.. 100.00 

N 

Naphtaly, Mr. and Mrs. Sam, 105 

Montgomery 100.00 

Nathan, Belle, 1914 Pine 3.00 

Nathan, Gerson, 311 California 30.00 

Nathan, Herman, Flood Bldg 100.00 

Nathan, Louis, Mills Bldg 100.00 

Nathan, M., 1862 Fillmore 6.00 

Nathan, Paul, 311 California... 6.00 

Nathan, Mr. and Mrs. Susskind, 1537 

Jones 12.00 

Nathan, Svlvan, 114 Sansome 6.00 

Nelson, I. D., 2602 Sacramento 12.00 

Neuberger, Gustave, care Adler San- 
atorium 50.00 

Neugass, Mr. and Mrs. Moses S., 144 

Twelfth 25.00 

Neustadter, Mr. and Mrs. David, 461 

Mission 350.00 

Neustadter, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob H., 

461 Mission 500.00 

Neustadter, Mr. and Mrs. Louis W., 

461 Mission 200.00 

Neustadter, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob H., 

Hotel St. Francis 500.00 

Neustadter, Mr. and Mrs. Newton H., 

461 Mission 100.00 

Newbauer, Eugene, 39 Battery 20.00 

Newbauer, Mr. and Mrs. George S., 

Davis and Pacific 90,00 125.00 

147 



1915 1916 

Newbauer, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse, 39 

Battery 50.00 

Newbauer, Mr. and Mrs. Julian H., 

Davis and Pacific 150.00 175.00 

Newbauer, Mr. and Mrs. Sanford R., 

2421 Buchanan 125.00 150.00 

Newburg, Miss Jennie, 3017 Jackson. 9.00 

Newhouse, Arthur A., 311 Battery... 100.00 

Newhouse, Mrs. Henry Dina, 1898 

Pine 50.00 

Newhouse, Hugo D., Rm. 519 Kohl 

Building 100.00 

Newhouse, Wm. D., 526 California... 100.00 

Newman, Charles B., 733 Market.. 25.00 

Newman, Edwin S., 171 Common- 
wealth 50.00 

Newman, Mrs. Fanny and Miss Mil- 
dred, Hotel Richelieu 50.00 

Newman, George, Rm. 251 Russ Bldg. 10.00 

Newman, Mr. & Mrs. Juda, 110 Mkt. 400.00 

Newman, Louis J., Newman, Cal 50.00 

Newman, Samuel J., 2200 Mission 25.00 

Newman, Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund J., 

110 Market 300.00 

Newman, Simon Walter, 3527 Clay.. 100.00 

Newmark, Dr. Leo, Rm. 802 Butler 

Building 25.00 

Nickelsburg, Florence, 1911 Sac'to... 12.00 

Nickelsburg, Melvil S., 557 Mission.. 50.00 

Nickelsburg, Mr. and Mrs. Siegfried, 

559 Mission 200.00 

Nieto, Rev. Jacob, 3933 Clay 27.00 

Nieto, Mrs. Jacob, 3933 Clay 6.00 

Nordman, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph, 186 

Geary 60.00 

Nordman, Harry, 186 Geary 20.00 

Nusbaum, Ted, 154 Sutter 12.00 



Oppenheimer, Adolph, 1905 Pacific Av. 15.00 
Oppenheimer, Arthur C, 700 Grand, 

Alameda, Cal 12.00 

Oppenheimer, James, 791 Market 12.00 

Oppenheimer, Leopold, Balboa Bldg. 10.00 
Ordenstein, Mr. and Mrs. Max, 2131 

Divisadero 60.00 

Ormond, Mrs. Charles K., 1550 Fill- 
more 3.00 

Ostroski, Mrs. Amelia, Palace Hotel 100.00 
Ottenheimer, Alice F., 94 N. Twenty- 
first, Portland, Oregon 3.00 

Ottenheimer, Henry J., 80 Front, 

Portland, Oregon 15.00 

Ottenheimer, Mrs. Martin C, 807 

Franklin 10.00 

Ouliff, Mrs. Blanche, 2377 Sutter 18.00 



Patek, Mr. and Mrs. Fred, 934 Larkin 150.00 
Pauson, E. H., Kearny and Sutter.. 25.00 
Pauson, Frank, Rm. 306 Adams Bldg. 100.00 
Pauson, Jacob W., Rm. 306 Adams 

Building 100.00 

Pauson, Samuel B., 200 Kearny 100.00 



148 



1915 1918 

Peiser, Bertha, 3017 Jackson 8.00 

Peiser, Sol, 3017 Jackson 6.00 

Peixotto, Mrs. Myrtilla, Russ Bldg... 25.00 

Pencovic, Max H., 953 Market 50.00 

Peyser, Mr. and Mrs. Charles, 77 

Battery 6.00 

Philipp, Clarence F., 311 California.. 25.00 

Philipp, Mrs. Hattie, Hotel Richelieu 50.00 

Phillips, Mrs. B. F., 1429 McAllister.. 20.00 

Phillips, L. A., 354 Pine 18.00 

Phillips, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney M., care 

M. Phillips & Co., Sansome & Green 25.00 

Phillips, Mrs. S. M., Hotel Richelieu 100.00 

Pike, Boaz D., 1918 Sacramento 15.00 

Pike, Mrs. Georgie S., 1918 Sac'to... 21.00 

Pinkson, Mrs. Theresa C, 2708 Sutter 6.00 

Pinto. E., 47 Kearny 12.00 

Plato, George J., San Francisco Hos- 
pital 12.00 

Platshek, Mark J., Pacific Bldg 100.00 

Poheim, Mrs. Hugo G., 812 Market.. 3.00 

Politzer, Alex., 519 California 75.00 

Pollak, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold, Room 

715 Merchants' Exchange Bldg 15.00 

Poly, Isaac, 3434 Clay 25.00 

Posner, Max, 52 Main 24.00 

Posner, Mrs. Philip, 379 Hayes 9.00 

Posner, Mrs. Theresa, 117 Beulah 6.00 

Prag, Mrs. Mary, 2712 Webster 10.00 

Prager, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac, Market 

and Jones 50.00 

Prager, Mr. and Mrs. Lesser, Market 

and Jones 125.00 

Prager, Miss Nita, Hotel Richelieu 5.00 

Prescott, Mrs. J., 3038 Jackson 10.00 



Raas, Alfred E., 833 Market 100.00 

Raas, Charles. 833 Market 12.00 

Raas, Emanuel, 10C Locust 50.00 

Raas, Joseph C, 535 Folsom 50.00 

Raiss, Albert, 429 California 10.00 

Raiss, Mr. and Mrs. Carl, 429 Cali- 
fornia 350.00 

Ransohoff, Mr. and Mrs. Leopold, 228 

Post 100.00 

Ransohoff, Robert, 230 Post 12.00 

Raphael, M., 3156 24th St 12.00 

Raphael, Nat., Rm. 251 Russ Bldg.. 30.00 

Raphael, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 5 

Powell 20.00 40.00 

Ratner, H., 121 Geary 25.00 

Rau, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen L., Grant 

Ave. and Geary 87.50 

Redlick, Henrv, 2200 Mission 50.00 

Redlick, Mrs. Ludwig, 1264 Page 15.00 

Reeb, Ferdinand, 728 Page 9.00 

Reeb, Mrs. Ferdinand, 728 Page 9.00 

Regensberger, Ernest O., 758 Fifty- 
fourth St., Oakland 6.00 

Regon, Mrs. Jacob, 1533 Octavia 3.00 

Reich, Leo, 860 Sutter 21.00 

Reichenbers:, Mrs. F.. 3899 Sac'to... 6.00 

Reichert, Edward, 211 3d Ave 12.00 25.00 



149 



1915 1916 



Reiss, Mrs. Jeanette, 1516 Post 20.00 

Reuben, Abe, 136 Pine 6.00 

Reuben, Etta, 436 O'Farrell 6.00 

Reyman, Julia, 460 Montgomery 50.00 

Rhine, Elias, 245 Montgomery 12.00 

Rich, Alfred J., 58 Sutter 39.00 

Rich, Samuel H., 3180 Washington.. 6.00 
Riese, Mrs. David, 71 Jordan Ave... 5.00 
Ringolsky, G. C, 805 Claus Spreck- 

els Bldg 10.00 

Rinder, Reuben R., Rm. 1809 Bdwy.. 9.00 
Rittigstein, Jacob M., 100 Stockton.. 6.00 

Robin, Mrs. Reka, 440 Capp 10.00 

Rogers, H. M., 136 Sansome 18.00 

Rohlffs, Mrs. A. Marie, 1120 Lombard 5.00 
Roos, Mr. and Mrs. Achille, Market 

and Stockton 500.00 

Roos, Mr. and Mrs. George H., Mar- 
ket and Stockton 300.00 

Roos, Mr. and Mrs. Leon L., Market 

and Stockton 150.00 

Roos, Robt. A., Market and Stockton. 100.00 

Rosen, Samuel, 1745 Ellis 6.00 

Rosenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. Albert M., 

2614 Jackson 250.00 

Rosenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. Albert S., 

402 Marine Bldg 20.00 

Rosenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 

W., 214 Front 250.00 

Rosenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. D. S., care 
Haas, Baruch & Co., Los Angeles, 

Cal 50.00 

Rosenbaum, Mrs. Herman A., 2263 

Post 12.00 

Rosenbaum, J., 25 Stockton 12.00 

Rosenbaum, Milton A., 2614 Jackson. 10.00 
Rosenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M.. 

214 Front 150.00 

Rosenbaum, Mrs. Sigmund D., Hotel 

St. Francis 300.00 

Rosenberg, Abraham, 334 California 500.00 
Rosenberg, Adolph, 334 California... 500.00 

Rosenberg, Bernard, 51 Main 50.00 

Rosenberg, Isidor, 45 Kearny 25.00 

Rosenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph, 916 

Larkin 100.00 

Rosenberg, Mrs. Lena, 334 California 25.00 
Rosenberg, Max L., 334 California. . . 500.00 
Rosenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Morris, 30 

Commonwealth Ave 18.00 

Rosenblatt Mr. and Mrs. Arthur S., 

2250 Jackson 100.00 

Rosenblatt, Mr. and Mrs. Irving S., 

300 Second 50.00 

Rosenblatt, Mrs. Rose, 300 Second... 150.00 
Rosenblum, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, 

138 Arguello Blvd 20.00 

Rosener, Charles S., 57 Powell 15.00 

Rosener, Leland S., Merchants' Ex- 
change Bldg 25.00 

Rosenfeld, Judith, Hotel Clift 12.00 

Rosenfeld's (John) Sons, Room 1024, 

Merchants' Exchange Bldg 750.00 

Rosenfield, Julius M., Clin! House, 

Ocean Beach 60.00 

Rosenheim, Mrs. Samuel, 244 Pine.. 200.00 



150 



1915 1916 



Rosenshine, Adolph, 2401 Jackson 40.00 

Rosenshine, M. W., 3125 Jackson 40.00 

Rosenstein, Otto, 15th and Folsom.. 25.00 
Rosenstirn, Dr. Julius, 126 Stockton 50.00 
Rosenstock, Mrs. Samuel W., 1819 

Jackson 500.00 

Rosenthal, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac L., 

1964 Pacific Ave 250.00 

Rosenthal, Mr. and Mrs. Marcus, 802 

Balboa Bldg 60.00 

Rosenthal, Max, 734 Mission 25.00 

Rosenthal, N., Room 714 Merchants' 

Exchange Bldg 100.00 

Rosenthal, Mrs. Rosa, 2299 Sac'to 10.00 

Rosenthal, S., 22 Battery 12.00 

Rosman, Mr. and Mrs. Saul, 845 Bu- 
chanan 12.00 

Roth, A., 2615 Daguna 50.00 

Roth, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel, 214 Front 250.00 
Roth, Mr. and Mrs. Fred, 704 Market 100.00 
Roth, Lester L., Fairfax Ave. and 

Newhall 50.00 

Rothbach, B., 2461 Post 9.00 

Rothchild, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert L., 

Mills Bldg 50.00 

Rothchild, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M., 

Mills Bldg 350.00 

Rothschild, Abe, 135 Kearny 100.00 

Rothschild, Mrs. Hugo, 2848 Wash.. 18.00 
Rothschild, Mr. and Mrs. John, Mar- 
ket and Spear 100.00 

Rothschild, Joy B., 1200 Taylor 6.00 

Rothschild, Morris, 2348 Franklin... 12.00 
Rothschild, Robert B., 969 Mission.. 12.00 
Rothschild, Walter, Room 2002 Ho- 

bart Bldg 25.00 

Ruben, Mr. and Mrs. Paul R., 24 Cal. 30.00 
Rubenstein, Mrs. Annie, 950 Broad- 
way 6.00 

Rudee, Mrs. Dr. Henry E., 3038 Jack- 
son 6.00 



Sachs, David M., Rm. 364, Mills Bldg. 100.00 

Sachs, Mr. and Mrs. David, 182 Geary 50.00 

Sachs, Edgar D., Rm. 364 Mills Bldg. 100.00 

Sachs, Miss Hattie, Room 364, Mills 
Bldg 100.00 

Sachs, Mrs. Mary, Hotel Fairmont.. 250.00 

Sachs, Sanford, 140 Geary 400.00 600.00 

Sahlein, Mr. and Mrs. Henry, 1718 
Jackson 250.00 

Salberg, Mrs. Nellie, 3412 Washington 10.00 

Salomon, Mrs. N., 4553 California 6.00 

Salomon, Mme. S., 2620 Buchanan... 9.00 

Salomon, Maurice, Room 801 Hum- 
boldt Bank Bldg 25.00 

Salts, Mrs. Fannie, care Union Trust 
Co 6.00 

Salz, Mr. and Mrs. Ansley K., Benicia 100.00 

Salz, Mr. and Mrs. Edward, Decoto, 

Alameda County, Cal 100.00 

Salz, Howard H., Benicia 50.00 

Salz. Milton H., Merchants' Ex- 
change Bldg 25.00 



151 



1915 1916 

Sampson, Dr. A. P., 133 Geary 5.00 

Samson, Mrs. Rudolph, care Samson 

& Co., Rm. 504, Flat Iron Bldg 350.00 500.00 

Samson, Walter J., care Samson & 

Co., Rm. 504, Flat Iron Bldg 50.00 75.00 

Samter, Leonhard O., 758 Mission 25.00 

Samter, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice L., 

758 Mission 25.00 

Samter, Samuel L M 758 Mission 50.00 

Samter, Samuel M., Mills Bldg 25.00 

Samuel, Max, 247 Bush 25.00 

Samuels, Albert S., 895 Market 6.00 

Samuels, Mrs. David, Hotel Richelieu 100.00 

Samuels, Jacob, Rm. 630, Mills Bldg. . 50.00 

Samuels, Joseph (in memory of), 3588 

California 6.00 

Samuels, Mr. and Mrs. Louis T., City 

Delivery Co., Eddy and Hyde 75.00 

Samuels, Oscar, Rm. 630, Mills Bldg. 6.00 

Saroni, Mr. & Mrs. Louis, 823 Battery 200.00 

Savanah, M., Geary and Grant Ave.. 12.00 

Schamberg, Herbert L., 3899 Wash.. 12.00 . 

Schapiro, Bernard, 903 Phelan Bldg. 50.00 

Scharlach, S. J., 86 3d 25.00 

Scharlin, Mrs. John A., 937 Dupont. . 3.00 

Scheeline, Edwin S., 115 Front 25.00 

Scheeline, Mrs. H., 115 Front 50.00 

Scheeline, Harold, 115 Front 25.00 

Scheeline, Mr. and Mrs. Lester, care 

Hochheimer & Co., Willows, Cal.. 25.00 

Scheeline, Mr. and Mrs. Simon C, 

care Anglo London Paris Nat'l Bk. 250.00 

Scheeline, Mr. and Mrs. Sol E., 244 

Pine 100.00 

Schlesinger, Benj. F., care The Em- 
porium 100.00 

Schlesinger, Mr. and Mrs. Bert, 3948 

Clay 72.00 

Schlessinger, Mr. and Mrs. Charles, 

Room 449 Mills Bldg 75.00 

Schlesinger, Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy, 

Box 118, Mill Valley, Cal., 50.00 

Schlesinger, Sydney, Room 307, Mills 

Bldg 5.00 

Schloss, Benjamin, 42 Beale 50.00 

Schloss, Mrs. Florence F., 1809 Cal.. 150.00 

Schmidt, Benjamin J., 35 Sansome.. 25.00 

Schmitt, Edward A., Room 605 Mer- 
chants' Exchange Bldg 25.00 

Schmoll, Dr. Emile, City of Paris 

Bldg 100.00 

Schnaittacher, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvain, 

233 Post 51.00 

Schnee, Mr. and Mrs. Gustav, 80 Sil- 
ver Ave 100.00 

Schneider, David N., 2625 Mission... 10.00 

Schoenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, 2010 

Pacific Ave 500.00 

Schoenfeld, David M., 518 Washington 15.00 

Schoenfeld, Mrs. Jonas, 2238 Pac. Av. 100.00 

Schonwasser, Emil G., Sutter and 

Grant Ave 20.00 

Schussler, Henry, 326 Grove 60.00 

Schussler, Mr. and Mrs. John, 2109 

Pacific Ave 100.00 

Schussler, Toby, 326 Grove 50.00 



152 



1915 1916 

Schwabacher, Mrs. Abraham, 214 

Front 500.00 

Schwabacher, Abraham (in memory 

of), 214 Front 250.00 

Schwabacher, Albert E., 609 Market 50.00 

Schwabacher, Mrs. Bella, 1820 Clay.. 750.00 

Schwabacher, Mrs. Carrie, 2000 

Gough 300.00 

Schwabacher, Frank, 310 Sansome... 150.00 

Schwabacher, James H., 541 Market 100.00 

Schwabacher, Mr. and Mrs. Louis A., 

214 Front 500.00 

Schwabacher, L. M., Santa Maria, 

Cal 10.00 

Schwabacher, Max, Room 715 Kohl 

Building 50.00 

Schwabacher, Miss M i n a S., 1900 

Jackson 50.00 

Schwabacher, Samuel I., care Schwa- 
bacher Bros. & Co., Seattle, Wash. 50.00 

Schwabacher, Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund, 

1900 Jackson 1,000.00 

Schwartz, Gustav Sutro, 840 Powell.. 10.00 

Schwartz, Harry, 439 California 6.00 

Schwartz, Leonard N., 32 Montgmy. . . 6.00 

Schwartz, Samuel C, 2704 24th 12.00 

Schwartz, Sol, 879 Market 12.00 

Schwartz, Mrs. Wm., 410 Montgmy. 18.00 

Schweitzer, Albert M., 3600 Clay 12.00 

Schweitzer, Bernard (In memory of) 200.00 

Schweitzer, Mrs. Jacob, 3750 Clay... 150.00 

Schweitzer, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice, 

Room 342 Mills Bldg 500.00 

Schweitzer, Maurice, Jr., 3600 Clay.. 12.00 

Schweitzer, Mr. and Mrs. Melville, 

136th Fifth 100.00 

Seeligsohn, Selig M., care Manassee, 

Block Tanning Co., West Berkeley, 

Cal 6.00 

Seeman, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob, 1065 

McAllister 12.00 

Seller, Arthur. 139 Fremont 25.00 

Seiler, Mrs. Carrie, 2509 Van Ness Av. 9.00 

Selig, Philip, 518 Market 20.00 

Selig, Samuel S., 518 Market 25.00 

Seller, Mr. and Mrs. Henry, 14 Spear 50.00 

Seller, Samuel, Merchants' Ex. Bldg. 50.00 

Seller, Sanford E., 14 Spear 25.00 

Selling, S. E., care Illinois Pacific 

Glass Co 15.00 

Sena, Mark. 1336 McAllister 6.00 

Shaen, J., 339 Sansome 6.00 

Shainwald, Richard S., 34 First 200.00 

Shainwald, Mrs. Richard S., 1925 

Gough 25.00 

Shaw, Mr. and Mrs. Henry, 2224 Clay 25.00 

Sheffer, Miss Rose, 436 O'Farrell 6.00 

Sheftel, M., 2083 Bush 9.00 

Sheideman, Hattie, 2275 Broadway.. 6.00 

Shemanski, Mr. and Mrs. Isidore, 

1017 Market 50.00 

Shipper, Mrs. Sol., 1326 McAllister 6.00 

Shirek, Mrs. Dorathea, care A. Shirek 

& Sons, Bush and Sansome 50.00 

Shirek, Herbert M., 119 Bueh 15.00 

Shirek, Sidney, 119 Bush 30.00 

Shirpser, Miss Elsie, 89 Sixth Ave.. 6.00 



153 



1915 1916 

Siebenhauer, Lester, Hotel Norman- 
die 6.00 

Siebenhauer, Mathilda, 1st & Grape, 

San Diego, Cal 3.00 

Siebenhauer, Sally, Hotel Granada.. 24.00 

Siegel, Mrs. Hortense, 1916 Jackson. 75.00 

Sieroty, Bernard, 2352 Mission 18.00 

Sieroty, Mr. and Mrs. Henry, 1017 
Market 50.00 

Silverberg, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph, 
Mills Bids 500.00 

Silverberg, Dr. Melville, 1018 Head 
Building 6.00 

Silverberg, Mrs. Simon, 3575 Wash- 
ington 100.00 

Silverman, Adolph, 1062 Market 100.00 

Silverman, Moritz, 1062 Market 100.00 

Simon, Mrs. C. J., 2067 Green 3.00 

Simon, Mrs. E p h r a i m , Hotel St. 
Francis 100.00 

Simon, Harry L., 454 Scott 6.00 

Simon, Hattie, 2136 Pacific Ave 500.00 

Simon, Mrs. Lucien W., 2045 Divisa- 
dero 15.00 

Simon, Silas, Hotel St. Francis 30.00 

Simon, Sig., 1636 Bryant 25.00 

Simon, Mrs. Stella G., 1918 Franklin 75.00 

Simons, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, 38 San- 
some 25.00 

Singer, Israel, 1292 Golden Gate Ave. 6.00 

Sinsheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard, 
149 California 100.00 

Sinsheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar, Rm. 

1211, Flood Bldg 25.00 50.00 

Sinsheimer, Mrs. Henry, 110 Market. 100.00 

Sinsheimer, Henry, 110 Market 650.00 

Sinsheimer, P. A., 833 Market 12.00 

Sinsheimer, Mrs. Samuel C, War- 
rington Apts 11.00 

Sloss, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph, 310 San- 
some 200.00 

Sloss, Mr. & Mrs. Leon, 310 Sansome 200.00 

Sloss, Louis, 310 Sansome 100.00 

Sloss, Mrs. Louis, 310 Sansome 500.00 

Sloss, Hon. Mr. and Mrs. Max C, 
Wells Fargo Bldg 250.00 

Smith, Mr. and Mrs. William, 1002 
Washington, Oakland 12.00 

Snow, Samuel, 80 Market 9.00 

Solomon, Aaron, 375 McAllister 3.00 

Solomon, Henry I., Second & Mission 60.00 

Solomons, Mr. and Mrs. Lucius L., 
Sharon Bldg 100.00 

Sommer, Max, 838 Market 50.00 

Son, Mrs. Adolph A., 2124 Brodwa3' 100.00 

Son, Charles A., 837 Mission 50.00 

Sondheimer, Moses, 151 Post 250.00 

Sonnenberg, Sig., 154 Sutter 12.00 

Spiegelman, Joseph, 1189 Oak 3.00 

Spiegelman, Morris, 1636 Bryant 25.00 

Spiegelman, Rebecca (in memory of) 3.00 

Spielman, H., 820 Laguna 6.00 

Spring, Sam, Mills Bldg 25.0C 

Springer, Abraham C, Hotel Granada 50.00 

Spiro, Mr. & Mrs. M., 1919 Divisadero 24.00 

Stahl, Mr. and Mrs. Adolfo, 14 
Montgomery 1,500.00 



154 



1915 1916 

Stein, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham, Third 
and Mission 50.00 

Stein, J. H., 320 Phelan Bldg 25.00 

Stein, Mrs. J. H., 1386 McAllister... 6.00 

Steinbach, Henry, 350 Mills Bldg 10.00 

Steinberg., S., Army and Alabama. . . 18.00 

Steinberg, Solomon, 426 3d Ave 3.00 

Steinberger, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph, 25 
Kearny 100.00 

Steinberger, Irwin, Hotel St. Francis 12.00 

Steinberger, Julius, 25 Kearny 50.00 

Steinberger, Robert, 25 Kearny 12.00 

Steinhart, Ignatz, Sutter & Sansome 500.00 

Steinhart, Jesse H., Room 305 Mon- 
adnock Bldg. 50.00 

Steinhart, Mrs. Jesse, 2527 Fillmore 50.00 

Steinhart, Mrs. Wm., 2521 Scott 60.00 

Steiner, David H., 59 Stockton 30.00 

Steinman, Bernard U. (in memory 
of), 50 Arguello Blvd 100.00 

Steinman, Mrs. Irving L., 2576 Val- 
lejo 25.00 

Steinman, Mrs. Rebecca, 3157 Jackson 10.00 

Sterling, Mr. and Mrs. J., 1129A 
Guerrero 9.00 

Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham, Pine 

and Battery 250.00 500.00 

Stern, Mrs. Emanuel L., 2109 Pacific 
Avenue 6.00 

Stern, Henry, 1424 18th 5.00 

Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob, Pine and 
Battery 1,500.00 

Stern, Mr. & Mrs. Jacob, 110 Market 100.00 

Stern, J. W., 1636 Market 6.00 

Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Louis, Pine and 
Battery 500.00 

Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Moses, 1040 Mc- 
Allister 50.00 

Stern, Philip, 2233 Washington 50.00 

Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund, Pine 
and Battery 500.00 

Sternfeld, Mrs. Jenny, 3314 Clay 20.00 

Sternheim, Benj. F., Room 200 Phe- 
lan Building 25.00 

Sternheim, Mrs. Rosie, Room 200 
Phelan Building 25.00 

Stettheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Walter W., 

1st and Mission 240.00 

St. Goar, Henry, 419 California 200.00 

Stock, Louis, 910 Broadway, Oak- 
land, Cal 6.00 

Stock, S. M., 753 Market 20.00 

Stone, Mrs. Theresa, 706 Stanford 
Court 100.00 

Stoff, Mrs. L. D., 46 Kearny 12.00 

Stolz, Mrs. Henrietta, 1729 Lyon 6.00 

Stolz, Max, 14 Sansome 6.00 

Stone, A. L., 332 Spruce 21.00 

Stone, Mrs. A. L., 332 Spruce 12.00 

Stone, L. D., 32 Geary 15.00 

Strassburger, Isaac, 411 Montgomery 250.00 

Strassburger, Mrs. Isaac, 411 Mtgmy. 250.00 

Strassburger, Mr. and Mrs. Law- 
rence, 411 Montgomery 75.00 

Strassburger, Virginia, 214 Front 25.00 

Straus, Mrs. Bertha, Hotel Norman- 
die 18.00 

155 



1915 1916 



Straus, Miss Emma, Hotel Norman- 
die 3.00 

Straus, Mr. & Mrs. Louis, 11 Battery 100.00 
Strauss, Mrs. Arthur, 1475 McAllister 15.00 

Strauss, Edgar L., 353 Bush 6.00 

Strauss, Emanuel Samuel, Assessor's 

Office 6.00 

Sugman, Harry, 706 Laguna 6.00 

Sultan, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest J., 234 

Twelfth 50.00 

Sultan, Mr. and Mrs. Julius, 3471 

Jackson 30.00 

Sultan, Walter D., 3471 Jackson 6.00 

Summerfield, Mr. and Mrs. Lesser, 

997 Market 40.00 

Susskind, Mrs. Rosa, 3145 Washington 25.00 

ton 25.00 

Sussman, L. I., 140 Spear 50.00 

Sussman, Mrs. Emilie, 2335 Pacific 

Ave 500.00 

Sutro, Theresa, 412 Montgomery 100.00 

Sutro & Co., 412 Montgomery 200.00 

Sweet, Mrs. Annie E., Visalia, Cal.. 75.00 



Tash, Marcus, 335 Stockton 12.00 

Taubles, Dr. G. H., 323 Geary 6.00 

Taussig, Albert, 1873 McAllister 9.00 

Tauszky, Edmond, 55 New Montgy. . 48.00 

Terkeltaub, M., 677 McAllister 3.00 

Thieben, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph, 667 

Mission 20.00 

Thorner, Mr. & Mrs. Theo., 244 Pine. 40.00 
Toklas, Ferdinand, 713 Postal Tele- 
graph Bldg 40.00 

Tonn, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph, 3440 Clay 25.00 

Toplitz, Joseph B., 381 Bush 45.00 

Toplitz, Melville S., Room 1011, First 

National Bank Bldg 50.00 

Triest, Benno, care Haas, Baruch & 

Co., Los Angeles 15.00 

Triest, Frank, 734 Mission 25.00 

Triest, Jesse B. and Martin, 734 

Mission 300.00 

Triest, Joseph, 200 Davis 100.00 

Tuehler, Dr. A. S., 703 Van Ness Ave. 6.00 



Unger, Cecilia, 2415 Franklin 21.00 

Unna, Harry, 770 Mission 25.00 

Unna, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob, 453 Stev- 
enson 50.00 

Uri, Mrs. Felix, 1849 O'Farrell 25.00 

Uri, Mose, 85 Union Square Ave.... 6.00 



Van Vliet, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, 3 

Stockton 50.00 

Van Vliet, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice, 29 
Kearny 75.00 



156 



1915 1916 



Voorsanger, Abraham W., Clunie Bid. 30.00 
Voorsanger, Mrs. Jacob, care J. H. 

Voorsanger, Insurance Exch. Bldg. 25.00 

Voorsanger, L. M., 139 Fremont 15.00 



W 

Wacholder, Joel, 15th and Folsom... 10.00 

Waldeck, Mr. and Mrs. Herman, 3090 

Clay 250.00 350.00 

Waldeck, Hugo, 124 Sansome 25.00 

Waldman, Mrs. Lena, Empire Court 

Apartments 6.00 

Wallenstein, Mr. and Mrs. Morris, 

583 Market 20.00 

Walter, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence R., 

100 Stockton 500.00 

Walter, Mrs. Doreth, Room 449, Mills 

Bldg 21.00 

Walter, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac N., 100 

Stockton 1000.00 

Walter, Mr. and Mrs. John I., 100 

Stockton 300.00 

Walter, Mrs. Hannah, care D. N. & 

E. Walter & Co 500.00 

Walter, Sanford F., Room 449 Mills 

Building 15.00 

Wand, Joseph, 154 Sutter 20.00 

Wand, Mrs. Samuel, 154 Sutter 20.00 

Wangenheim, Emil S., 110 Market... 250.00 500.00 
Wangenheim, Mr. and Mrs. Henry, 

Room 820, Merchants' Ex. Bldg 100.00 

Wangenheim, Mr. and Mrs. Sol., Ho- 
tel Richelieu 300.00 

Wanger, Mrs. Stella, 461 Mission 100.00 

Wascerwitz, Mr. and Mrs. Morris H., 

Room 803 Claus Spreckels Bldg 50.00 

Waterman, Emil, 255 California 35.00 

Waterman, Jesse H., 704 Market 25.00 

Weglein, Mrs. John J., 3099 Jackson 20.00 

Weil, A. L., Room 1206 Alaska Com- 
mercial Bldg 50.00 

Weil, Alexander W., 133 Fremont... 50.00 

Weil, Mr. and Mrs. Charles B., 25 

Stockton 25.00 

Weil, Samuel, 720 Mission 51.00 

Weiler, Mrs. A. J. f 163 22d Ave.... 6.00 

Weilheimer, Julius, 439 Sutter 6.00 

Weill, Joseph, 1824 Bush 10.00 

Weill, Michel, Sutter and Grant Ave. 20.00 

Weill. Raphael, Sutter & Grant Ave. 250.00 

Weinlander, Miss Cordie, Hotel Rich- 
elieu 3.00 

Weinshenk, Mr. and Mrs. Chas., 717 

Market 30.00 

Weinshenk, Mr. and Mrs. Sydney, 

717 Market 30.00 

Weinstock, Mr. and Mrs. Harris, 19 

Presidio Terrace 200.00 

Weissbein, Jacob, care Hobart Bldg., 

582 Market 65.00 

Weissbein, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph, 952 

Sutter 65.00 

Weissman, Max, 2047 Mission 9.00 



157 



1915 1916 



Weisskopf, Samuel, 860 Sutter 6.00 

Welisch, Mrs. Walter T., 24 Calif... 6.00 

Wenzelburger, A., 268 Market 5.00 

Werner, Mrs. L., 2277 Howard 6.00 

Wertheimer, B. L., 99 Beale 12.00 

Wertheimer, Mr. & Mrs. Jacob, 2236 

Pacific Ave 50.00 

Wertheimer, Mrs. Sarah, Hotel Ma- 
jestic 25.00 

Whitehill, Irvin, care The Emporium 12.00 

Wiel, Alfred L., 661 Mission 35.00 

Wiel, Eli H., 661 Mission 150.00 

Wiel, Dr. & Mrs. H. I., Butler Bldg. 10.00 

Wiel, Mrs. Henrietta, 661 Mission... 350.00 

Wiel, Irvin J., Room 710, Kohl Bldg-. 175.00 

Wiener, Jacob, 39 Fifth 6.00 

Wiener, Julius, 1449 Fulton 3.00 

Wiener, Mrs. Minnie L., 830 Page 5.00 

Willard, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M., 

3252 Clay 60.00 

Willard, Jules, 316 Battery 25.00 

Willard, Leon, 412 Commercial Bldg. 15.00 

Willard, Maurice, 316 Battery 50.00 

Windt, Henry, 26th and San Bruno.. 20.00 

Windt, Morris, 26th and San Bruno.. 50.00 
Wise, Mr. and Mrs. Otto Irving, 

Wells Fargo Bldg 250.00 

Wolbach, Karl, 200 Davis 100.00 

Wolf, Mrs. Annette, 2876 Washington 6.00 

Wolf, E. Myron, Monadnock Bldg 20.00 

Wolf, Hyman, 1607 Fillmore 12.00 

Wolf, Isaac, 1607 Fillmore 12.00 

Wolf, Mr. and Mrs. Julius L., 2694 

Sacramento 125.00 

Wolf, Max, 245 California 50.00 

Wolfe, Mrs. Leonora, 3165 Wash 6.00 

Wolfe, Milton, 461 Mission 6.00 

Wolff, Harry K., Rm. 322 Russ Bldg. 25.00 

Wolff, Herman, 2001 Fillmore 6.00 

Wolff, Mr. and Mrs. Moise L., 2507 

Pacific Ave 150.00 

Wollenberg, Fred H., 233 Maple 6.00 

Wollenberg, Mrs. Heyman, 233 Maple 50.00 

Wollin, I., 1546 Alice, Oakland 6.00 

Woolf, Mrs. S., 1134 Ellis 6.00 

Wood, Mrs. S. N., 1458 Page 5.00 

Woods, H., 129 Geary 12.00 

Wormser, Gustav, 140 Spear 125.00 

Wormser, Mrs. Louise, Hotel Belle- 

vue 300.00 

Wormser, Pauline A., 166 Geary 12.00 

Wormser, Samuel I., 203 California. . 200.00 

Wormser, Mrs. Samuel I., 203 Calif. . 50.00 
Wolf, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob W., 23 

Grant Ave 125.00 

Wunsch. Mrs. Minna, 517 Kohl Bldg. 24.00 



Young Women's Hebrew Association, 

1562 Ellis 3.00 



Zadig, Herman, 324 Bush 50.00 

Zeeve, J. W., 924 First Ave., Seattle 15.00 



158 



1915 1916 
Zeimer, Mrs. Hannah K., 673 Wals- 

worth Ave., Oakland 12.00 

Zelinsky, David, 564 Eddy 25.00 

Zellerbach, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony, 

Battery at Jackson 250.00 

Zellerbach, Helena Barbara, Battery 

at Jackson 6.00 

Zellerbach, Plenry W., Battery at 

Jackson 25.00 

Zellerbach, Mr. and Mrs. Isidore, 

Battery at Jackson 125.00 300.00 

Zellerbach, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob C, 

Battery at Jackson 125.00 300.00 

Zemansky. J. H., 708 Ashbury 3.00 

Zentner, Dorothy, 1342 McAllister. . . 6.00 

Zentner, Jacob 3.00 

Zobel, Dr. and Mrs. A. J., Room 518 

Shreve Bldg 12.00 

Zobel, Harry H., 134 Fremont 3.00 

Zobler, Emanuel, 1114 Buchanan 10.00 

Zuckerman, H. G., 137 Drumm 5.00 

Zussman, Dr. Samuel, 1411 Scott 30.00 



159 



|Ht5t of (JJfedtars 

of 

(Eonstttimtt £$atx£ti£% 

fafya&e buzz arc 
colltcteit bg 

^oeratum 
of JefateJj Clprrttte* 



160 



Names marked with letters of the alpha- 
bet denote what organizations they belong 
to, as per following key: 

A — Emanuel Sisterhood. 

B — Eureka Benevolent Society. 

C — First Hebrew Benevolent Society. 

D — Free Burial Society (Chevra Kedusha). 

E — Free Loan Society (Chevra Gemilus Chasodim). 

F — Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled. 

G — Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Society. 

H — Jewish Educational Society. 

I — Jewish Ladies' Relief Society. 

J — Ladies' United Hebrew Benevolent Society. 

K — Mount Zion Hospital. 

L — Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home 
Society. 

M — Ladies' Auxiliary Pacific Hebrew Orphan 
Asylum. 

N— The Helpers. 

This list does not contain the names of 
those whose dues are collected by the Free 
Loan Society and Hebrew Home for Aged 
Disabled. 



161 



CITY MEMBERS 



Abraham, Louis (L), 1337 Laguna $ 6.00 

Abrams, Mrs. Louis (M), 3508 Sacramento 5.00 

Abramson, Mrs. D. (L), care Hotel Reich, 860 

Sutter 6.00 

Adler, Mrs. A. A. (A), 1590 Broadway 3.00 

Apple, Jacob J. (C), 565 Market 12.00 

Armuth, Mrs. A. S. (J), 1428 Fulton 6.00 

Ash, Mrs. E. K. (D-J), 1342 Jones 9.00 

B 

Baer, Mrs. L. (L), 3757 Clay..: 6.00 

Bamberger, Mrs. B. (L), Hotel Dorchester 6.00 

Bamberger, Mrs. Bernard (A), 3314 Clay 3.00 

Bare, Gustave (C), 130 Geary 12.00 

Baron, Mrs. D. (J), 2409 Washington 6.00 

Bauer, Moses (B-L), 49 Sansome 21.00 

Bauer, Mrs. Moses (I), 962 Post 12.00 

Bearwald, Louis (L), 560 Kearny 6.00 

Beerman, Adolph (L), Hotel Bristol 6.00 

Berwin, Charles (L), 37 Grant Ave 6.00 

Berwin, Mrs. Charles (J), 37 Grant Ave 6.00 

Bettman, Mrs. C. (N), 1355 Post 3.00 

Bianchini, Louis (L), 515 Market 12.00 

Bier, Charles S. (L), 33 California 6.00 

Bley, Simon (L), 2217 Pacific Ave 6.00 

Bley, Mrs. Simon (L), 2217 Pacific Ave 6.00 

Bier, Mrs. Joseph (K), 18 Palm Ave 6.00 

Bloch, Miss Estella (N), Polk and California 3.00 

Bock, Mrs. S. (L), 1473 O'Farrell 6.00 

Borck, L. J. (E-L), 93 Eddy 9.00 

Boskowitz, Frank (B-L), 327 Clay 21.00 

Biandenstein, Mrs. Herman (L), 3107 Wash. 6.00 

Brandenstein, Mrs. Meyer (G), 2442 Clay 6.00 

Breslauer, Mrs. H. (E-K), 1523 Laguna 9.00 

Breslauer, Isidore (L), 1957 Hayes 6.00 

Breslauer, Mrs. R. (L), 990 Geary 6.00 

Breyer, Mrs. J. M. (J), 122 Bush 6.00 

Brown, Mrs. Wm. (L), 1560 Larkin 6.00 

Brownstone, Mrs. I. (J-D), 133 Central Ave... 9.00 

Brownstone, Louis H. (L), Chronicle Bldg. . . 6.00 

Bruck, Leo (L), 1250 Hyde 12.00 

C 

Calmann, Julius (E-L), 30 Montgomery 9.00 

Calmann, Mrs. Julius (L), 30 Montgomery 6.00 

Camp, Mrs. M. (J), 1745 Eddy 6.00 

Carillon, Mrs. Charles (L), 4075 17th 6.00 

Cerf, Mrs. Albert (I), 2356 California 12.00 

Choynski, Mrs. Herbert (J), 2371 Broadway.. 6.00 

Coffee, Mrs. M. H. (L), 742 Hyde 6.00 

Cohan, Mrs. D. (J), 225 Post 6.00 

Cohen, Mrs. I. L. (A), 2932 Jackson 3.00 

Cohen, Mrs. M. (J), 2898 Clay 6.00 

Cohen, Mrs. S. (J), 439 Cherry 6.00 

Cohn, Mrs. Jacob (J), 3676 Sacramento 6.00 

Conn, G. M. (L), 138 Front 6.00 

Cohn, Miss Rosa (L), 164 Sutter 6.00 

Coleman, Sig. (L), 1527 Haight 6.00 

162 



Davidson, Mrs. J. R. (A-I), 2119 Buchanan. . . 15.00 

Davidson, Mrs. Meyer (D-J), 158 Beulah 9.00 

Desbeck, Mrs. R. (G-L), 807 Franklin 12.00 

Deutsch, Miss Eva (M), 2524 Clay 5.00 

Deutsch, Mrs. Ida (D), 3000 Pine 3.00 

Deutsch, Julius (L), 2524 Clay 6.00 

District Grand Lodge No. 4, I. O. B. B. (L), 

149 Eddy 50.00 

Dusenbery, Samuel (L), Hotel Bellevue 6.00 

E 

Ehrman, Edward (L), 24 California 6.00 

Eisenchimmel, Carl (D), 830 Market 6.00 

Elkus, Mrs. Charles J. (J), 71 6th Ave 6.00 

Elkus, Mrs. L. (A), Hotel Richelieu 3.00 

Epstein, Mrs. Henry (L), Hotel Normandie. . . 6.00 

Erb, Mrs. M. (L), 521 California 6.00 



Farguarson, Mrs. B. (K), 106 Pine 6.00 

Feder, Abraham S. (L), 742 Market 6.00 

Fehleisen, Mrs. F. (A), 2132 Washington 3.00 

Fisher, Charles (L), 130 Kearny 6.00 

Fishel, Mrs. Maggie (J-L), 1160 Pine St 12.00 

Frank, Mrs. Geo. W. (A-I), 1353 Post 15.00 

Frank, Mrs. I. H. (G), Boyes Hot Springs 6.00 

Frederick, Mrs. E. (J), 3895 Sacramento 6.00 

Frederick, Mrs. M. W. (J), 1426 Washington.. 6.00 

Friedlander, Abe (L), 38 Sansome 6.00 

Friedlander, Mrs. H. (J), 23 5th Ave 6.00 

Friesleben, Mrs. D. N. (A-I-L-M), 2226 Wash. 26.00 

G 

Gambitz, Miss U (N), 1465 Oak 3.00 

Gambitz, Dr. M. (N), 323 Geary 3.00 

Gambitz, Miss N. R. (L), 1465 Oak 6.00 

Gerson, Mrs. N. (L), 1918 Pine 6.00 

Getz, Mrs. A. M. (J), 153 5th Ave 6.00 

Getz, Mrs. B. (D-J-N), 1990 Sutter 12.00 

Getz, Mrs. Marcus (D-J), 1826 Eddy 9.00 

Goldberg, Leon B. (L), 795 Pine St 6.00 

Goodman, Miss Carrie (L), 3151 Washington 6.00 

Goodman, Miss Hattie (L), 3151 Washington 6.00 

Goodman, Theodore (L), St. Francis Hotel... 6.00 

Gradwohl, David (L), The White House 6.00 

Green, Mrs. S. H. (J), 1458 Page 6.00 

Greenberg, Max C. (L), Stockton and Market 6.00 

Greenberg, Mrs. Philip (J), 3934 Clay 6.00 

Grunauer, Mrs. H. (J), 2831 Clay 6.00 

H 

Harris, Mrs. W. (J), 50 21st Ave 6.00 

Harlem, Louis (L), 422 Sacramento St 6.00 

Hart, Harry J. (K-L), 310 Sansome 18.00 

Harshall, Gustav (L), Hotel Langton 6.00 

Held, Mrs. Fanny B. (L), 2311 Broad wav 6.00 

Heller, Mrs. E. L. (I), care S. W. Heller, 

Mills Bldg 12.00 

Heringhi, Mrs. Ed. (G-M), 1704 Sutter 11.00 

Herrmann, B. (K-L), Bush and Franklin 12.00 



163 



Hertz, Jacob (L), 2773 Clay 6.00 

Heskins, B. (L), 1132 Market 6.00 

Herzstein, Dr. M. (A-C-L-N), 805 Sutter 24.00 

Hirschberg, Mrs. David S. (A-D), Belgravia 

Apartments, 795 Sutter 6.00 

Hirschfeld, Mrs. J. (J), 1328 Hyde 6.00 

Hirschhorn, Mrs. Anna (L), 3d and Mission.. 6.00 

Honig, Mrs. A. (J), 100 2d Ave 6.00 

Hyman, Miss Helen T. (L), 2230 Sacramento 6.00 

Hyman, Mrs. M. (I-L), 2912 Jackson 18.00 



Isenberg, Mrs. Henry (L), 3432 Jackson 6.00 



Jacobs, Mrs. E. (J), 1774 Turk 6.00 

Jacobson, Mrs. C. (J), 2125 Pine 6.00 

Jacobson, James (L), 526 California 6.00 

Jacoby, Miss (A), 217 5th Ave 3.00 

Jacoby, Philo (L), 118 Taylor 6.00 

Jellinek, Dr. E. O. (K-L), Butler Bldgr 24.00 

Jellinek, Mrs. E. O. (A-D), 2226 Washington.. 15.00 

Jones, Mrs. J. (D), 2524 Clay 3.00 

Joseph, Albert (B), 68 Post 15.00 

Joseph, Ben M. (L), Rra. 865, Mills Bldg 6.00 



K 

Kahn, A. (L), 2332 Washington 6.00 

Kahn, Julius (B-C-E), 2712 Webster 30.00 

Kahn, Mrs. Leo (D), 1052 Divisadero 3.00 

Kaiser, Mrs. D. M. (A), 3601 Clay 3.00 

Kalisher, Mrs. Ed. (A-I-M), 25 Kearny 20.00 

Kalisher, Ed. (K-L), 25 Kearny 24.00 

Kalisher, Mrs. N. (J), 1774 Turk 6.00 

Kalisky, Mrs. M. (D-L), 1166 Turk 9.00 

Karpel, Mrs. C. P. (J-N), 478 Third Ave 9.00 

Katten, Simon, Jr. (L), 45 Sansome 6.00 

Kaufman, Mrs, L. (N), 701 Post 3.00 

Keiner, Herman (L), 265 Arguello Blvd 6.00 

Kellner, Mrs. M. (J), 638 Olive Ave 6.00 

Klein, N. (L), 1470 Sutter 6.00 

Klopstock, Mrs. C. (L), St. Catherine, Bush 

and Polk 6.00 

Kohlmann, Mrs. M. (J), 1433 Page 6.00 

Kozminsky, Miss Dora (N), 641 O'Farrell 3.00 

L 

Lando, Mrs. Hannah (M), 503 Waller 5.00 

Lando, Mrs. Joseph (L), 49 Portola 12.00 

Lask, Mrs. Frances Louise (J-L), 2329 Pacific 

Ave 12.00 

Lask, Geo. E. (L), 2329 Pacific Ave 6.00 

Laventhal, Mrs. S. (J), 225 Seventh Ave 6.00 

Lehmann, Mrs. (D), 1511 Gough 3.00 

Lehman, Miss Florence (A), 1511 Gough 3.00 

Levin, Mrs. A. S. (J), 3535 Washington 6.00 

Levin, Maurice E. (L-N), 124 Geary 9.00 

Levine, Louis (L), 2113 Jones 6.00 

Levison, Miss Alma (A), 2249 Broderick 3.00 

Levison, Mrs. Louis (I), 704 Market 12.00 



164 



Levy, Mrs. A. S. (J-L),,1576 Jackson 12.00 

Levy, Charles (B), 323 Scott 15.00 

Levy, Miss Edith (L), 1814 Post 6.00 

Levy, Mrs. Henri G. (L), Hotel Reich, 860 

Sutter 6.00 

Levy, Mrs. J. C. (A), 3294 Clay 3.00 

Levy, Jacob (B), 1328 Pierce 15.00 

Levy, Miss Jeanette (L), 663 2d Ave 6.00 

Lewis, J. E. (L), 567 9th Ave 6.00 

Lichtenstein, Mrs. H. (L), 2432 Jackson 6.00 

Lievre, Mrs. I. (N), 3032 Jackson 3.00 

Lilienthal, Miss Victoria (A), 2027 Sacramento 3.00 

Lindeman, Mrs. Chas. (J-L), 2218 Geary 12.00 

Lindner, Mrs. A. (L), 166 10th Ave 6.00 

Lindner, Dave (L), 126 Post 6.00 

Lindner, Mrs. Julius (J), 248 10th Ave 6.00 

Loewy, Hugo (L), 119 Bush 6.00 

Lowenberg, Albert J. (B-E-I-K-L), 2196 Jcksn. 30.00 

Lowenberg, George (L), 412 Montgomery 6.00 

Lowenstein, David (L), 261 Bush 6.00 

Lowenstein, Nathan (L), 1974 Union 6.00 

Lowenthal, Mrs. Simpson, 1111 Pine 5.00 

Lustig, Mrs. Dr. D. D. (A-I), 146 Grant Ave.. 15.00 
Lyons, Mrs. E. G. (A-G-M), 237 Sansome 14.00 



M 

MacQuiston, Mrs. Eva B. (K), 106 Pine 6.00 

Magnin, Emanuel (B), Geary and Grant Ave. 15.00 

Marcus, Alfred J. (L), 416 Battery 12.00 

Markewitz, Mrs. M. (N), 1919 Ellis 3.00 

Martin, Miss Esther (L), 1541 California 6.00 

Martin, Mrs. Mark (J), 1889 Sutter 6.00 

Marx, Mrs. Henry (L), 2439 Buchanan 6.00 

Mayer, E. B. (L), 1001 Pine 6.00 

Mayer, Joseph Henry (L), Rm. 428, Mills Bldg. 6.00 

Mayer, Mrs. Julius (A), 2335 Pacific Ave 3.00 

Meyer, Alfred Falck (A), 214 Pine 3.00 

Meyer, Mrs. M. E. (M), 1704 Sutter 5.00 

Meyer, Mrs. N. (J), 3436 Clay 6.00 

Meyerfield, Mrs. E. C. (J), 23 5th Ave 6.00 

Miller, Cora M. (A), 496 Laurel 3.00 

Miltzner, Mrs. Betsy (L), 1802 Broadway 6.00 

Moffitt, Augusta (L), 2101 Van Ness Ave 6.00 

Moise, Mrs. L. (J), 320 Walnut 6.00 

Moore, Mrs. I. C. (A-I-L), 1009 Shreve Bldg.. 21.00 

Moral, S. (L), 2304 Market 6.00 

Morgenthau, Henry (L), 1516 Post 6.00 

Morris, Mrs. H. (J), 3691 Clay 6.00 

Myers, Mrs. Henry (A-J), 2460 Washington... 9.00 

Myers, Henry (C-L), 2460 Washington 18.00 

N 

Nathan, Miss Belle (N), 1914 Pine 3.00 

Newman, Mrs. Alfred (J), City of Paris Bldg. 6.00 

Newman, Mrs. Chas. (L), 2480 Broadway 6.00 

Newman, E. (L), 154 Sutter 6.00 

Newman, Julian S. (L), 154 Sutter 6.00 

Newman, Jacob (L), 272 O'Farrell 6.00 

Newman, Mrs. Philip (A), 1494 Ellis 3.00 



Olcovich, Joseph (L), Merchants' Exchange... 6.00 
Oppenheim, Samuel (L), 110 Clay 6.00 



165 



Peyser, Mrs. A. L. (J), 1458 Page 6.00 

Pursch, Mrs. F. (J), Hotel Bristol 6.00 



Rapheld, Mrs. Maurice (L), 504 Lyons 6.00 

Regensburger, Dr. Alfred B. (A), 166 Geary.. 3.00 

Rehfish, Mrs. Paul (A), 432 Spruce 3.00 

Reiss, Mrs. Caroline (D-J-I), 212 1st Ave 21.00 

Rheinhold, Miss H. (N), 1716 Steiner 3.00 

Rich, Mrs. H. (J), 3180 Washington 6.00 

Roberts, Max (L), 219 East 6.00 

Roe, Max (L), 62 Stillman 6.00 

Roeding, Mrs. F. (M), 68 Post 5.00 

Rosenberg, Jos. H. (L), 73 Ellis 6.00 

Rosenberg, Julius S. (L), 1610 Scott 6.00 

Rosenberg, Mrs. S. S. (D), 2111 Steiner 3.00 

Rosenheim, Samuel (C-L), Chronicle Bldg 18.00 

Rosenstein, F. (L), 2021 Broderick 6.00 

Rosenthal, Maurice (K-L), 21 Battery 12.00 

Rosenthal, Mrs. Maurice (J), 21 Battery 6.00 

Roth, Mrs. Bertha (D-J), 2825 Sacramento... 9.00 

Rothberg, A. (L), 130 Geary 6.00 

Rothenberg, Mrs. H. (J), 2122 Pierce 6.00 

Rothschild, Mrs. Charles (L), 1200 Taylor 6.00 

Rothschild, Miss L. (A), 1918 Pine 3.00 

Rothschild, Mrs. Louise (L), 1918 Pine 6.00 

Rummelsberg, Mrs. Charles (N), 1167 Hayes.. 3.00 

Rude, A. M. (C-K-L), 121 Geary 24.00 

Rutofsky, Mrs. H. (J), 3605 Sacramento 6.00 

S 

Sachs, Nathan (L), Hotel Granada 6.00 

Sahlein, Mrs. M. (J), 3046 Jackson 6.00 

Salneld, Dr. Carl D. (L), 1890 Page 6.00 

Salz, Mrs. M. H. (A), 1916 Jackson 3.00 

Sampson, Mrs. A. F. (A), 3580 Washington... 3.00 

Samuels, Mrs. J. (J), 3663 Clay 6.00 

Savannah, Mrs. M. (J), 775 Post 6.00 

Savannah, Mrs. Samuel (J), 1457 Washington. .6.00 

Scharlin, Mrs. Abraham (J-L), 3804 California 12.00 

Scheier, Dr. Ralph B. (L), 126 Stockton 6.00 

Scheyer, Mrs. H. (J), 299 Arguello Blvd 6.00 

Scheyer, Sallush (L), 142 Sansome 6.00 

Scheyer, Mrs. Sallush (L), 299 Arguello Blvd. 6.00 

Schiff, Benj. L. (L), Hotel Claremont 6.00 

Setoff, Ed. R. (L), Hotel Claremont 6.00 

Schirpser, Mrs. Max (J), 89 6th Ave 6.00 

Schoen, Mrs. M. (J), 641 Lyon 6.00 

Schmalz, William (C), 77 Third 12.00 

Schmitt, Mrs. Helen A. (L), 3580 Clay 6.00 

Schmitt, Milton L. (L), 460 Montgomery 6.00 

Schmitt, Mrs. Milton L. (N), 3580 Clay 3.00 

Schoenfeld, Adolph (L), 963 Market 6.00 

Schoenfeld, Miss Belle (N), 2238 Pacific Ave.. 3.00 

Schoenholz, Mrs. S. (N), 2021 Broderick 3.00 

Schonwasser, Mrs. E. S. (I), 1528 Sutter 12.00 

Schwartz, Mrs. L. (A-L), 3824 Sacramento... 9.00 

Schwartz, Mrs. Sidney L. (L), 410 Montgomery 6.00 

Selig, Ben (K), 333 Kearny 6.00 

Selig, Mrs. I. (N), 931 Devisadero 3.00 

Selig, Isidore (L), 333 Kearny 6.00 

Shapiro, Philip (L), 664 Waller 6.00 



166 



Sheideman, Miss Dora (L), 22?5 Broadway... 6.00 

Sheideman, Phil J. (L), 2275 Broadway 6.00 

Sichel, Mrs. Henry (L), 291 Geary 6.00 

Siegel, Mrs. Julius (J), Hotel Normandie 6.0C 

Silverstein, J. (L), 536 Fell 6.00 

Silverstone, Frank (L), 557 Mission 6.00 

Silverstone, S. (L), 1226 Page 6.00 

Simon, Gus (L), Hotel St. Francis 6.00 

Simon, Dr. M. E. (L), 146 Grant Ave 6.00 

Simon, Mrs. T. (A), 3973 Clav 3.00 

Skaller, Mrs. G. (J), 861 Sutter 6.0C 

Slessinger, Mrs. Ben (A), 1718 Vallejo 3.00 

Solomon, Mrs. Max (J), 1507 Broderick 6.00 

Sperling, Frank (L), Call Bldg 6.00 

Sperling, Mrs. Frank (J), Call Bldg 6.00 

Stern, Mrs. R. Lipman (J), 1432 Steiner 6.00 

Stiller, S. (L), 1042 Howard 6.00 

Stitch, Mrs. J. B. (N), 1976 Bush 3.00 

Stolz, Mrs. A. (J), 2515 Van Ness Ave 6.00 

Stolz, Miss Minnie (N), 2515 Van Ness Ave... 3.00 

Stolz, Mrs. Rose (J), 2515 Van Ness Ave 6.00 

Stone, Mrs. Leon (A), 10 5th Ave 3.00 

Susskind. Mrs. S. H. (J), 33 Jordan Ave 6.00 



Tobriner, Dr. Oscar (L), Hotel Richelieu 6.00 

Tobriner, Mrs. Oscar (J), Hotel Richelieu.... 6.00 
Tuchler, Dr. A. S. (E-L), 703 Van Ness Ave.. 9.00 



Van Vliet, Mrs. Leon (D), 1640 Golden G. Av. 3.00 
Voorsanger, Mrs. Wm. (A), 2300 Jackson 3.00 



W 

Wedeles, Mrs. I. W. (J-N), 2120 California.... 9.00 

Weil, M. (A-L), 133 Fremont 9 00 

Weinlander, Ed. (L), Hotel Richelieu 6.00 

Wertheimer, Mrs. Chas. (M), 3143 Washington 11.00 

Wertheimer, Mrs. Kaufman (A), 1847 O'Farrl 3.00 

Wheeler, Mrs. C. (J), 1662 Broadway 6.00 

Witt, Mrs. Flora (L), 1880 Larkin 6.00 

Witt, Mrs. Julius (A-I.-N) *0 Pn1m Ave 12.00 

Wolberg, Mrs. A. G. (L), 1839 Laguna 6.00 

Wolfe, Sen. Ed. I. (E-H-L), 630 Mills Bldg.. 12.00 

Wolfen, Mrs. M. (D-J-N), 443 Front 12.00 

Wollenberg, C. M. (N), Supt. Relief Home... 3.00 

Wood, Meyer (B), 4th and Market 15.00 



Zacharowsky, Samuel (L), 137 Clay 6.00 

Zeimer, Mrs. Charles (J), 2329 Pacific Ave... 6.00 
Zekind, Mrs. S. (J), 1523 Laguna 6.00 



167 



Non- Resident 
Members 



168 



NON-RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Alameda, Calif. 

Flatow, P. (L).... $ 6.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. Al. (L) 6.00 

Rosenthal, H. (L) 12.00 

Anchorage, Alaska 

Dowit, Leo (L) 6.00 

Bakersneld, Calif. 

Baer, Mrs. C. E. (K) 6.00 

Conn, C. (L) 6.00 

Jastro, Henry A. (L) 6.00 

Belvedere, Calif. 
Lewis, Mrs. H. (A) 3.00 

Berkeley, Calif. 

Bauml, Mrs. J. (L) 6.00 

Block, Royal (L) 6.00 

Ferguson, Mrs. Rosalie (L) 6.00 

Fishel, Mrs. Charles (L) 6.00 

Jaffa, Prof. Edward M. (L) 6.00 

Marks, Mrs. S. M. (A) 3.00 

Boston, Mass. 

Hecht, Louis (L) 6.00 

Brookfield, Wash. 
Megler, J. G. (L) 12.00 

Capay, Calif. 
Levy, Wolf (L) 6.00 

Chicago, 111. 
Dallemand, Albert (B) 15.00 

Chinese Camp, Calif. 
Morris, Saul (L) 6.00 

Coalinga, Calif. 
Levy, M. (L) 12.00 

Corning, Calif. 
Kaufman, Mrs. Eva (L) 6.00 



169 



Dinuba, Calif. 

Seligman, E. (L) 12.00 

Seligman, L. (L) 12.00 



Dixon, Calif. 

Gottheimer, L. (L) . 6.00 

Elgin, Oregon. 
Sommer, Mrs. Amelia (L) 6.00 

Eufaula, Alabama. 

Roth, S. D. (L) 6.00 

Everett, Wash. 
Hochstadter, Bernhard (L) 6.00 

Fillmore, Calif. 
Felsenthal, David (L) 6.00 

Fresno, Calif. 

Einstein, Mrs. Louis (L) 12.00 

Gundelfinger, Henry (L) 6.00 

Gundelfinger, Mrs. Henry (K) 6.00 

Gundelfinger, Lee (K) 12.00 

Gundelfinger, Louis (K-L) 24.00 

Manheim, Emil (L) 6.00 

Hanford, Calif. 
Newman, David (L) 6.00 

Honolulu, Hawaii. 
Lando, Jacob (L) 6.00 



Los Angeles, Calif. 

Baruch, Mrs. Herman (L) 6.00 

Baruch, Mrs. Jacob (L) 6.00 

Behrendt, Casper (L) 6.00 

Greenewald, J. (L) 6.00 

Hellman, Maurice S. (L) 6.00 

Hoffman, Mrs. H. (L) 6.00 

Louis, Henry W. (L) 6.00 

Meyer, Ben ~(L) 6.00 

Meyer, Mrs. Ben (L) 6.00 

Meyer, Al. (L) 12.00 

Meyer, Louis (L) 12.00 

Mosbacher, G. (L) 6.00 

Newmark, M. A. (L) 6.00 

Newmark, Mrs. M. A. (L) 6.00 

Roos, J. (L) 6.00 

Seligman, Carl (L) 6.0.0 



170 



Maidnez, Calif. 
Blum, Mrs. Simon (L) 6.00 



Merced, Calif. 

Hartman, S. (L) 6.00 

Hartman, Mrs. S. (L) 6.00 



Milwaukee, Wis. 
Gardner, Herman (L) 6.00 

Modesto, Calif. 
Weil, Mrs. B. (L) 6 .00 



New v or k, N. Y. 

Adelsdorfer, Alfred (L) 6.00 

Haas, Kalman, (L) 25^00 

Hyman, M el (L) 6^00 

Hyman, iVi i s. Michael (L) ' \ 600 

Scholle, William D. (D) 6 00 



Oakland, Calif. 

Abrahamson, Jules (L) 6.00 

Abrahamson, Mrs. Jules (M) 5.00 

Alexander, Henry (L) 6.00 

Altma L) 6.00 

Bakar, P. < L; 12.00 

Bamberger, J . (L; 6.00 

Barnard, Morse (L; 6.00 

Bercovich, Harry (L) 6.00 

Davis, H. (L) ... 6.00 

Davis, Hyman (L) 6.00 

Dorman, Mrs. A. ( L) 6.00 

Dubovsky, M. (L) 6.00 

Ehrlich, Mrs. Sam (L) 6.00 

Fibush, Aaron (L) 6.00 

Fibush, Jacob (L) 6.00 

Frank, Mrs. Emily (L) 6.00 

Friedlander, Rev. M. (L) 6.00 

Friedman, M. (L) 6.00 

Glickman, M. (L) 12.00 

Goldman, Mrs. J. (L) 6.00 

Goodman, Harris (L) 6.00 

Greenebaum, Miss H. (L) 6.00 

Greenhood, E. J. (L) 6.00 

Greenhood, Max (L) 6.00 

Jacob, Charles (L) 6.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. B. (L) 6.00 

Jonas, Irving (L) 6.00 

Jonas, Mrs. M. (L) 6.00 

Kahn, Irving (L) 6.00 

Kahn, Mrs. Max (L) 6.00 

Lavenson, George H. (L) 12.00 

Lavenson, Mrs. George (M) 5.00 

Lebrecht, A. (L) 6.00 

Levy, Mrs. Henrietta (J-L) 12.00 

Lesser, J. H. (L) 12.00 



171 



Liechtenstein, S. (L) 6.00 

Lichtig, B. (L) $[qq 

Lindenbaum, Mrs. M. (L) 6.00 

Lissner, Mrs. Berthold (L) 6.00 

Livingston, Mrs. S. (L) 6.00 

Manbeim, Miss Marjorie (M) 5.00 

Manheim, Paul B. (L) 6.00 

Marymont, Mrs. H. (L) 6.00 

Mazor, Milton (L) 6.00 

Mosbacher, B. L. (L) 6.00 

Pantosky, J. (L) 6.00 

Reis, Louis (L) 6.00 

Ringolsky, S. (L) 12.00 

Ringolsky, Mrs. S. (M) 5.00 

Robinson, Mrs. Bertha (L) 6.00 

Rosenberg, H. Z. (L) 6.00 

Salinger, Mrs. A. M. (L) 6.00 

Samuels, George (L) 6.00 

Samuels, Mrs. George (L) 6.00 

Samuels, Mrs. H. M. 'M) 5.00 

Samuels, S. (L) 6.00 

Sapiro, Mrs. Selina (L) 6.00 

Scharman, H. (L) 6.00 

Schary, Edward (L) 6.00 

Scheeline, Louis (L) 6.00 

Scheeline, Mrs. M. (L) 6.00 

Schmidt, M. J. (L) 6.00 

Schneider, Morris N. (L) 6.00 

Schneider, Mrs. M. (M) 5.00 

Schuman, Mrs. L. (L) 6.00 

Schwartz, J. (L) 6.00 

Shafran, A. (L) 6.00 

Sickles, Mrs. Lena (L) 6.00 

Silverman, O. S. (L) 6.00 

Silverman, Mrs. O. S. f L) 6.00 

Silverstein, Mrs. A. (L) 6.00 

Silverstein, Harry (L) 12.00 

Silverstein, Max (L) 6.00 

Simon, B. (L) 6.00 

Snide, L. (L) 6.00 

Whitehead, Mrs. F. (L) 6.00 

Wise, Dr. Charles F. (L) 6.00 

Wollin, Mrs. I. (M) 5.00 

Zeimer, Henry K. (L) 6.00 



Omaha, Neb, 
Jacobs, Mrs. Minna (L) 6.00 



Oregon City, Ore. 

Jacobs, Mrs. Clara (L) 6.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. Flora (L) 6.00 



Oroville, Calif. 
Marks, Max (L) 6.00 



Oxnard, Calif. 

Levy, Henry (L) 6.00 

Levy, Achille (L) 6.00 

Levy, Mrs. Achille (L) 6.00 



172 



Placerville, Calif. 

Mierson, A. (L) 6.00 

Pleasanton, Calif. 

Arendt, J. N. (L) 6.00 

Arendt, Mrs. J. N. (L-M) 11.00 

Portland, Oregon. 

Cohen, Arnold (L) 6.00 

Fried, Leo (L) 6.00 

Jacobson, Clarence S. (L) 12.00 

Lang, I. (L) 6.00 

Levy, Mark (L) 6.00 

Levy, C. R. (L) 6.00 

Lippitt, Julius (L) 6.00 

Lowengart, Philip (L) 6.00 

Mayer, S. Julius (L) 6.00 

Mozorovsky, H. (L) 6.00 

Neustadter, B. (L) 6.00 

Selling, Ben (L) 12.00 

Selling, Philip (L) 6.00 

Simon, Hon. Joseph (L) 6.00 

Simon, N. D. (L) 6.00 

Simon, Samuel (L) 12.00 

Waldman, E. (L) 6.00 

Waldman, S. (L) 6.00 

White, I. L. (L) 6.00 

Winter, M. (L) 6.00 

Redwood City, Calif. 

Stern, Mrs. Louis (L) 12.00 



Reno, Nev. 

Scheeline, Moritz (B) 15.00 

Wolfe, Edward (L) 6.00 



Sacramento, Calif. 

Bonnheim, A. (K-L) 18.00 

Frommer, B. (L) 6.00 

Horanson, Mrs. Sarah (L) 6.00 

Nathan, Charles P. (B-C-L) 33.00 



San Diego, Calif. 

Blochman, A. (L) 6.00 

Klauber, Mrs. A. (L) 6.00 

Klauber, Melville (L) 6.00 

Wangenheim, Julius (L) 6.00 

Wangenheim, Mrs. Julius (L) 6.00 



San Jose, Calif. 

Hart, Alex J. (L) 6.00 

Hirsch, Leon S. (L) 6.00 

Jaffe, Miss Charlotte L. (L) 12.00 

Levy, Jesse H. (L) 6.00 

Loeb, Gabriel (L) 6.00 

Loeb, Isaac (L) 6.00 

Osterman, William (L) 6.00 



173 



San Mateo, Calif. 

Levy, Adrien (L) 12.00 

Levy, Fernand (L) 12.00 

Levy, Joseph (L) 12.00 

San Rafael, Calif. 

Albert, Jacob (L) 6.00 

Erlanger, Mrs. Herman (I-L) 18.00 

Galinger, Mrs. Meyer (A) 3.00 

Magnes, Mrs. R. (J) 6.00 

Rheinstein, Mrs. Alex (J) 6.00 

Santa Ana, Calif. 

Reinhaus, Julius (L) 6.00 

Reinhaus, Max (L) 6.00 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 

Abram, M. (L) 6.00 

Cohen, Aaron (L) 6.00 

Gaba, M. (L) 6.00 

Gosliner, A. (L) 6.00 

Magidson, S. (L) 6.00 

Rhein, Henry (L) 6.00 

Santa Maria, Calif. 

Schwabacher, L. M. (L) 6.00 

Santa Rosa, C^lif. 

Rosenberg-, Max (L) 6.00 

Seattle, Wash. 

Gottstein, J. (L) 6.00 

Gottstein, Mrs. K. (L) 6.00 

Gottstein, M. (L) 6.00 

Loeb, S. S„ (L) 6.00 

Ladies' Monteiiore Aid Society (L) 12.00 

Moyses, Ben (L) 6.00 

Singerman, Paul (L) ' 6.00 

Spokane, Wash. 

Oppenheimer, Mrs. Mose (M) 5.00 

Stockton, Calif. 

Aaron, Samuel (L) 6.00 

Arendt, M. S. (L) 6.00 

Cohen, Albert (L) 6.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Julius (L) 6.00 

Frankenheimer, Louis (L) 6.00 

Frankenheimer, Samuel (L) 6.00 

Genser, Mrs. H. (L) 6.00 

Granich, B. (L) 6.00 

Gunzerdorfer, Ferdinand (L) 6.00 

Katten, Leopold (L) 6.00 

Katten, M. (L) 6.00 

Levinsky, Mrs. Rose Marks (L) 6.00 

Markheim, M. (L) 6.00 

Menasses, Moritz (L) 6.00 

Safferhill, Sylvan (L) 6.00 



174 



Sapiro, Louis (L) 6.00 

Sinai, Mrs. Max (L) 6.00 

Stein, I. F. (L) 6.00 

Stein, M. P. (L) 6.00 

Stein, Mrs. M. P. (L) 6.00 

Steinhart, Carl (L) 6.00 

Weinstein, M. (L) 6.00 

Susanville, Calif. 

Alexander, Julius (L) 6.00 

Knoch, Mrs. Isaac (in memory of) (M) 5.00 

Tacoma, Wash. 

Feist, Theodore (L) 6.00 

Jacob, Meyer (L) 6.00 

Tucson, Arizona. 

Steinfeld, Albert (L) 6.00 

Ventura, Calif. 

Guggenheim, George (L) 6.00 

Visalia, Calif. 

Levis, Adolph (L) 6.00 

Levis, Mrs. Adolph (L) 6.00 

Levis, Leon (K-L) 12.00 

Yolo, Calif. 

Borach, B. (L) 6.00 



175 



SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



FEDERATION 

\ OF 

JEWISH CHARITIES 



SAN FRANCISCO 
CALIFORNIA 




For the Year Nineteen Sixteen 






THE AIMS OF THE 

FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



FIRST — To represent for the community an organized 
effort for good and the proper administration of 
charitable, philanthropic and kindred work. 

SECOND — To eliminate indiscriminate and unauthorized 
forms of solicitations, ticket selling, bazaars, fairs, etc. 

THIRD — To assure the community a fair and equitable 
distribution of the funds collected, to the end that 
the greatest number may benefit in the largest 
measure possible. 

FOURTH— To insure to the public a full and detailed ac- 
counting of the distribution of funds, both of the 
central body and the constituent organizations. 

FIFTH — To enable the institutions to give their full 
time and attention to the work before them, by re- 
moving from their labors the collection of funds from 
the public. 

SIXTH — To investigate proposed philanthropic under- 
takings and advise as to their necessity or merit. 



Seventh Annual Report 

OF THE 

Federation of Jewish Charities 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

ORGANIZED JUNE 1, 1910 

CONSTITUENT SOCIETIES 



EMANU-EL SISTERHOOD 

EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 

FIRST HEBREW BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 

FREE BURIAL SOCIETY 

HEBREW FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION 

HEBREW HOME FOR AGED DISABLED 

HEBREW LADIES' SEWING SOCIETY 

JEWISH EDUCATIONAL SOCIETY 

JEWISH LADIES' RELIEF SOCIETY 

LADIES' UNITED HEBREW BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 

MOUNT ZION HOSPITAL 

PACIFIC HEBREW ORPHAN ASYLUM AND HOME SOCIETY 

THE HELPERS 






FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1916 



Office 
436 O'FARRELL STREET 

Telephone Franklin 546 



INDEX 



EMANUEL SISTERHOOD 

Officers 76 

Financial Statement 77 

Head Worker's Report 78 

EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 

Officers and Financial Statement... 64 

President's Report 65 

FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES 

Officers 3 

Committees 4 

President's Report 5 

Financial Statement 9 

Comparatives Tables 12 

FREE BURIAL SOCIETY 

Officers and Financial Statement 90 

HEBREW BOARD OF RELIEF 

Officers and Committees 50-51 

Directors Report 52 

Financial Statement 59 

Statistics 61 

HEBREW FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Officers 88 

Financial Statement 89 

HEBREW HOME FOR AGED DISABLED 

Officers and Committees 70 

Vice-President's Report 71 

Financial Statement 74 

HEBREW LADIES SEWING SOCIETY 

Officers and Financial Statement 91 

JEWISH EDUCATIONAL SOCIETY 

Officers and Financial Statement 92 

MOUNT ZJON HOSPITAL 

Officers and Committees 39 

House and Dispensary Staff 40-41 

President's Report 42 

Financial Statement 46 

PACIFIC HEBREW ORPHAN ASYLUM 
AND HOME SOCIETY 

Officers 16 

Committees 17 

President's Report 18 

Financial Statement 22 

Table-Orphanage Maintenance 26 

Table-Home Maintenance 27 

List of Subscriptions, Building Fund 28 

Sup't of Orphanage Report 30 

Sup't of Home Report 35 

THE HELPERS 

Officers and Financial Statement 93 



lb 




II !!'JH II 

mm 




EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 



Federation of Jewish Charities 



OFFICERS 1917 



President 
I. W. HELLMAN, Jr. 

First Vice-President 
HENRY S'INSHEIMER 

Second Vice-President 
MORGAN A. GUNST 



Treasurer 
MARK L. GERSTLE 

Secretary 
MEYER H. LEVY 

Supt. of Social Service 
I. IRVING LIPSITCH 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

According to Constituent Societies Representation 



Emanu-EI Sisterhood 
Mrs. Matilda Esberg 
Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld 

Eureka Benevolent Society 

Simon Anspacher 
Frederick Baruch 
Sylvan L. Bernstein 
Morgan A. Gunst 
Joel K. Hecht 
Charles Hirsch 
Henry G. Meyer 
Sig. S'chwabacher 
Henry Sinsheimer 
Otto Irving Wise 

First Hebrew Benevolent Soc'y 

Louis Abrahams 

A. Aronson 

Lesser Prager 

Free Burial Society 

Mrs. George Greenzweig 

Hebrew Free Loan Association 

M. Spiegelman 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 

Albert M. Bender 

Joseph Hyman 

Emile E. Kahn 

Emile Levy 

Isaac Moss 

Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Society 
Mrs. I. S. Ackerman 
Jewish Educational Society 
Rev. J. Nieto 



Jewish Ladies' Relief Society 

Mrs. Maurice Schweitzer 

Ladies' United Hebrew Benevo- 
lent Society 
Mrs. Lina Badt 

Mount Zion Hospital 

Abraham Lincoln Brown 

Albert E. Castle 

Mark L. Gerstle 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. 

J. B. Levison 

Maurice Liebmann 

A. Mack 

Henry S. Manheim 

A. C. Springer 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum 

and Home Society 
Manfred Brandenstein 
S. M. Ehrman 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
Alex. Goldstein 
David J. Guggenhime 
Abraham Haas 
Louis Haas 
Joseph Haber, Jr. 
Louis A. Schwabacher 
Hon. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Jesse Steinhart 
Miss Hilda Steinhart 

The Helpers 

Mrs. Sophie Ldlienthal 



— 3 — 



STANDING COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERATION 
OF JEWISH CHARITIES 

1917 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



I. W. HELLMAN, Jr., Chairman 
Term expires March 1919 



Term expires March 

A. Aronson 1919 

Albert M. Bender 1920 

Sylvan L. Bernstein 1918 

Manfred Brandenstein 1920 



Term expires March 

Mark L. Gerstle 1919 

Morgan A. Gunst 1918 

Henry S. Manheim 1920 

Henry Sinsheimer 1918 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Henry Sinsheimer, Chairman 



Frederick Baruch 



Abraham Haas 



STATISTICS AND UNIFORM ACCOUNTING 

Henry S. Manheim, Chairman 
Louis Greenhood Henry G. Meyer 

PURCHASING COMMITTEE 



Manfred Brandenstein, Chairman 



David J. Guggenhime 



Jacob J. Jacobi 



SUBSCRIPTION COMMITTEE 

Sylvan L. Bernstein, Chairman 



Jules Abrahamson 
Albert M. Bender 
Herbert M. Brown 
Leo J. Clayburgh 
Isaac Goldman 
Jacob J. Gottlob 
Emil Greenebaum 
Walter Haas 
I. Hanak 

Joseph Heineberg 
Josh. D. Isaacs 
Andrew A. Jacob 
Emile E. Kahn 
Simon Katten 
M. S. Kohlberg 
Max Levy 



Edgar S. Lewis 
Max P. Lilienthal 
P. N. Lilienthal 
Julien Lippman 
Ed. B. Louisson 
Grover A. Magnin 
Henry S. Manheim 
H. A. Miller 
George H. Roos 
Albert Schwabacher 
Edgar Sinsheimer 
Gerald H. Simon 
A. C. Springer 
Joseph Thieben 
Samuel Weisskopf 
Harry K. Wolff 



— 4 — 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



To the Board of Governors and Members of the 
Federation of Jewish Charities. 

Ladies and Gentlemen: 

It affords me pleasure to welcome you to the 7th annual 
meeting of the Federation of Jewish Charities of San Fran- 
cisco, and I am glad of the opportunity of presenting to you 
a short review of the activities of our organization, together 
with its constituent societies. 

For many years past the Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum 
has been housed in a wooden building which was almost 
a disgrace to the community. It is a fire-trap of the worst 
kind and although all possible precautions have been taken, 
it still remains a menace to the lives of the children. 
During the year the Board of Directors applied to the 
Executive Committee of the Federation for permission to 
make a collection of at least Three Hundred Fifty Thousand 
Dollars ($350,000) for a new building. Permission was 
granted and I am pleased to report that an amount largely 
in excess of the minimum has been collected from our 
contributors. 

A much closer relation has been established between the 
various institutions and your Executive Committee, and the 
Executive Committee is much more closely in touch with 
their work. We are pleased to be able to report that all 
of our institutions with fixed plants such as the Orphan 
Asylum, the Hospital, the two Old People's Homes, and the 
Emanu-El Sisterhood are well, efficiently and economically 
conducted, even though the increased cost of everything 
which they must buy has and will still more in the future 
largely increase their expenses. Our societies for Social 
Service such as the Hebrew Board of Relief, the Free Loan 
Association, the Emanu-El Sisterhood and the other smaller 
societies are being rapidly brought to a condition where 
we will be able to point with real pride to their activities. 

In the course of time we have found that it was necessary 
to broaden the scope of the work to be performed by Feder- 
ation itself. The original By-laws provided that Federation 
should act simply as a collection agency doing the work 
of social service and charity entirely through the constitu- 
ent societies. As time passed^ it became more and more 
evident that Federation's own work had to be divided into 
two parts; one of these being the collection of funds and 
the other the solution of the general problems connected 

— 5 — 



with Jewish social activities. At the last annual meeting 
of the Board of Governors, the By-laws were so amended 
as to give to your Executive Committee the power neces- 
sary for this purpose, and in conformity with this idea, we 
have divided our work into two distinct departments; one 
the business end, concerned simply with the monetary and 
business affairs of Federation itself, as well as of its con- 
stituent societies, and at the head of this Department we 
have placed Mr. Meyer H. Levy, who has since the organi- 
zation of Federation most efficiently acted as your Secre- 
tary. As Superintendent of Social Service we were fortu- 
nate in being able to secure Mr. I. Irving Lipsitch, who for 
many years was Superintendent of the Industrial Immigrant 
Aid Society in New York, and who has had much other 
experience in social service work. He only commenced 
his work here in October last, but we have commenced to 
feel the effect of his efforts and personality and feel that 
we are to be congratulated in having him with us. 

During the past year there has been a decided improve- 
ment in cordial feeling between our constituent organi- 
zations. They are acting more and more in harmony, and 
we know that we are approaching the point where co-ordi- 
nation in thought and action, and duplication of work and 
expense will be almost entirely eliminated. 

There are many things that the Executive Committee of 
Federation feels to be absolutely necessary for the future 
welfare of the Jewish community of San Francisco which 
they have not been able to do on account of an absolute 
lack of money. We have been doing our relief work on 
a hand-to-mouth basis, and in place of making our people 
self-supporting, I am sorry to say that hundreds of them 
have been pauperized, not necessarily because we did not 
know better, but because we only had the funds for purely 
temporary relief and no money for permanent aid. 

In every community there are many families who are 
ordinarily self-supporting but who, through unemployment 
of the bread winner, become dependent upon charity. Not 
only is it costly for the community to maintain such fami- 
lies, but there is always the danger that those who receive 
aid during a period of unemployment may, through con- 
tact with the chronic dependent, have their character 
weakened to such an extent that they will endeavor to re- 
ceive assistance at times when it is not absolutely necessary. 

The Hebrew Board of Relief has, through its Employ- 
ment Committee, endeavored to provide work for those 
who were unable to find it themselves either through lack 
of initiative or through a limited knowledge of the city's 
industrial resources. The members of that Committee 
labored earnestly, conscientiously and faithfully, and met 
with a measure of success in their efforts. But there is 

— 6 — 



imperative need for an agency, detached physically and 
otherwise from the building in which material relief is 
given, which shall have as its sole object the finding of 
work for Jewish men and women who are unable to find 
it for themselves. The Employment Bureau is only one 
of many things which are absolutely necessary, and I 
am only giving it to you as an example. 

I am sorry to have to report that our funds are becoming- 
less and less adequate to the needs of the Constituent 
Societies, and when I say needs, I mean absolute needs, 
and that our present happy-go-lucky method of allowing 
our constituent societies to eat up their capital has reached 
its final limit. During the past year the Orphan Asylum 
would have needed from us Forty-Eight Thousand Dollars 
($48,000) beyond its own income to enable it to exist. We 
have been able to allot only Thirty-Three Thousand Five 
Hundred Dollars ($33,500) and it has actually, therefore 
been compelled to spend Fourteen Thousand Five Hundred 
Dollars ($14,500) out of its invested funds, legacies, and 
donations. Mt. Zion Hospital spent Thirty-Eight 
Thousand Dollars ($38,000) beyond its income and out of 
this amount we were able to allow them only Twenty- 
Three Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($23,500) 
leaving a net deficit of Fourteen Thousand Five Hundred 
Dollars ($14,500) but in this case there were no invested 
funds and there, were no donations sufficient to cover, and 
the Mt. Zion Hospital today is deeply in debt. The Hebrew 
Board of Relief had a deficit of Seventy Thousand Dollars 
($70,000), out of which we were only able to allow them 
Fifty-Seven Thousand Dollars ($57,000). They have abso- 
lutely used up their invested funds now, and unless we can 
do better for them this year, I do not know what will happen. 
I am not going down the line of constituent societies; the 
same story applies to each and every one of them, and I 
will only say that we have got to increase the subscriptions 
to the Federation of Jewish Charities up to at least Two 
Hundred Thousand Dollars ($200,000) per annum unless 
we want to have the Jewish community face to face with 
the disgrace of having to close its charitable institutions. 
The income from subscriptions and dues has very gradually 
increased since the Federation was formed in 1910. The 
first year's income from this source was One Hundred 
Twenty-One Thousand Five Hundred Sixty-One Dollars 
($121,561) and the income in 1916 was One Hundred Thirty- 
Eight Thousand Four Hundred and Fourteen Dollars 
($138,414), but this ratio of income is an absolute insuf- 
ficient one because at the same time that this increase 
went into effect, the donations received by Federation have 
decreased from Sixteen Thousand Dollars ($16,000) in 1912 
to Three Thousand Dollars ($3,000) in 1916, and the needs 



of our various institutions are growing larger and larger. 
1 am afraid that I have told you this same thing so often 
that you will doubt that the Jewish charities of San Fran- 
cisco are today in a most precarious condition, but, ladies 
and gentlemen, we have absolutely reached our limit, and 
the matter is in your individual hands. Each and every 
one of us must increase and largely increase his or her 
individual subscription. Not one of us has deprived him- 
self of anything by reason of the small amounts which we 
are giving to Charity, and we must not only increase our 
own subscriptions, but our relatives and friends must be 
made to increase theirs also; not ten per cent, twenty per 
cent, or fifty per cent, but one hundred per cent increase 
is what we must have from each one. It will mean nothing 
to you, but if you do not do your duty during the year 1917, 
Mt. Zion Hospital will have to close its doors and the 
Hebrew Board of Relief and all of the other societies will 
be compelled for sometime during the year to cease their 
entire work. Thousands of poor Jews will be compelled 
to starve and the famed charity of the Jews will for the 
first time in history be found absolutely wanting, and that 
in the City of San Francisco, known all over the world for 
the generosity of its citizens. 

Respectfully submitted, 

I. W. HELLMAN, Jr., 

President. 



— 8 — 



FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1916 



N C O M E 



Subscription Account 

Total Subscriptions for 1916 $134,036.43 

Sundry balances due for 1915 $ 7,833.70 

Less written off as uncollectable 1,993.00 

5,840.70 

139,877.13 
Less credit balances account 1915 subscriptions 839.22 

139,037.91 
Amount uncollected at end of fiscal year 1916 6,398.08 

Less payments in advance for 1917 760.92 

5,637.16 

Total amount collected account subscriptions. .$133,400.75 

Membership Dues 

Collected by Federation account Constituent Societies. 2,643.75 
Collected by Federation account P. H. O. A. & Home 

Society 708.00 

Collected by Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 594.25 

Collected by Hebrew Free Loan Association 1,067.25 

Total amount collected account subscriptions 
and membership dues $138,414.00 

Donations 
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Stern, commemorating birth of first 

grandson $ 1,000.00 

Mrs. Henrietta Wiel, in memory of husband 

Lewis P. Wiel 1,000.00 

Jesse Warren Lilienthal 500.00 

Sigmund Schwabacher 500.00 

Albert Dernham 250.00 

Mrs. Hannah Keesing 125.00 

In memory of Sophie Federlein 100.00 

M. Greenebaum 100.00 

In memory of Juda Boas 100.00 

Greenhood and Jansen 75.00 

Congregation Emanu-El — Charity Boxes 137.25 

A. J. Brandenstein 50.00 

Beth Israel — Sunday School 25.00 

Mrs. Henri G. Levi 10.00 

Albert M. Bender 5.00 

■ 3,977.25 

— 9 — 



Flower Memorial Donations 
From Directors of the Young Men's Hebrew 

Association, in memory of Joseph A. Cohn. 12.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Newburg — memory of 

a Friend 1.00 

13.00 

Interest 

From Treasurer's balances 442.72 

From Bernard Schweitzer Memorial Fund... 200.00 
From Mrs. Frederick Jacobi Memorial Fund. . 100.00 
From Sundry Bonds 320.00 

1,062.72 



Total Income $143,466.97 



EXPENDITURES 

Allotment to Constituent Societies 

P. H. O. A. & Home Society $33,500.00 

Mount Zion Hospital 22,700.00 

Hebrew Board of Relief 57,000.00 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 7,500.00 

Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Society 1,000.00 

Emanu-El Sisterhood 4,250.00 

Jewish Educational Society 3,000.00 

Hebrew Free Loan Association 2,554.30 

Free Burial Society 450.00 

The Helpers 750.00 

Prison Reform Committee 100.00 

$132,804.30 

Expenses 

Proportion of House Expense $ 476.43 

Proportion of Taxes 85.20 

Proportion of Insurance 47.75 

Proportion of Office Expense 2,936.76 

Stationery, Printing and Postage 1,586.34 

Collector's Commissions 515.90 

5,648.38 

Total Expenditures - $138,452.68 

Income $143,466.97 

Expenditures 138,452.68 

5,014.29 
Less transferred to Memorial Fund. .$1,000.00 

Less written off on Loan Account 3,900.00 

4,900.00 



Surplus $ H4.29 

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 

ASSETS 

Cash with Union Trust Company $ 3,040.93 

Cash with Anglo California Trust Co 968.42 

4,009.35 

Bonds 6,774.61 

— 10 — 



Dues Receivable — 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 594.25 

Hebrew Free Loan Association 1,067.25 

P. H. O. A. & Home Society 891.82 

2,553.32 

Expense Receivable — 

Mount Zion Hospital 709,23 

Hebrew Board of Relief 1,351.54 

2,060.77 

Loan Account — Mount Zion Hospital 100.00 

Total Assets $ 15,498.05 

LIABILITIES 
Allotment Balances Due 

Mount Zion Hospital $ 3,700.40 

Hebrew Board of Relief 3,000.00 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 500.40 

Emanu-El Sisterhood 250.40 

Free Burial Society 200.40 

Prison Reform Committee 100.00 

Hebrew Free Loan Association 54.70 

Hebrew Ladies Sewing Society .40 

7,806.70 

Endowment Fund 2,500.00 

Capital Account January 1, 1916 5,077.06 

Surplus for fiscal year 1916 114.29 

. 5,191.35 

Total Liabilities $ 15,498.05 

MEMORIAL FUNDS 

In memory of Bernard Schweitzer — 

invested in 5,000 Spring Valley Water Co. Bonds $ 5,000.00 

In memory of Mrs. Frederick Jacobi — 

invested in 2,500 Union Pacific R. R. Co. Bonds $ 2,500.00 

STATISTICS 
New and Increased Subscriptions 

Total amount of new subcriptions received $ 1,304.00 

Total number of new subscribers — 45 

Increased subscriptions from 46 subscribers 4,232.50 

$ 5,536.50 
Losses 

By death — 46 subscribers $ 2,283.00 

By resignation — 76 subscribers 1,726.00 

By decreases — 23 subscribers 554.50 

By suspensions — 12 subscribers 417.00 

4,980.50 

Net Increase $ 556.00 

Amount uncollected at end of 1915 $7,883.70 

Amount collected against 1915 balances 2,114.00 

Amount written off as uncollectable 1915 1,084.05 

Amount uncollected at end of 1916 6,398.08 

Respectfully submitted, 

MEYER H. LEVY, 

Secretary. 



— 11 — 







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— 12 — 



GREENHOOD AND JANSEN 
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 



San Francisco, June 30, 1917. 

Mr. I. W. Hellman, Jr., President Federation of 
Jewish Charities. 

Dear Sir: 

Upon the completion of an audit of the books of account 
of the Federation and examination of the records pertaining 
thereto for the fiscal year 1916, we have the pleasure of 
submitting our report thereon in the form of a Statement 
of Assets and Liabilities, as at December 31, 1916, compared 
with that of December 31, 1915, supported by a Statement 
of Income, Allotments and Expense for 1916, compared 
with 1915. 

During the course of the audit, the accuracy of the re- 
corded cash receipts of subscriptions and donations was 
established by inspection of the official receipts issued as 
represented by consecutively numbered duplicates on file 
and in addition the former was also agreed by comparison 
with the aggregate cash credits appearing upon Subscribers ' 
and Members' ledger cards. 

Disbursements were verified by reference to the original 
vouchers, and by means of properly signed and endorsed 
bank checks. The bank accounts were verified by re- 
concilement with the several bank statements, and the 
arithmetical correctness of the entries and accounts in 
general duly established. The bonds on hand were con- 
firmed by a letter from the Anglo-California Trust Com- 
pany, where they are deposited for safe keeping. 

The Annual Report drawn up by your Secretary was also 
compared by us and found to be in agreement with all 
transactions of the Federation. We have pleasure in 
stating that all the records examined give evidence of care- 
ful and conscientious attention. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Greenhood & Jansen 

By L. H. Greenhood, 

Certified Public Accountant. 

— 13 — 



REPORTS 



CONSTITUENT 
SOCIETIES 



— 15 — 



Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum 

and Home Society 



Incorporated July 25, 1871 



OFFICERS 1917 

President 
JUDGE MAX C. SLOSS 

Vice-President 
ABRAHAM HAAS 

Treasurer 
UNION TRUST CO. OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Secretary 

MEYER H. LEVY 
436 O'Farrell Street, Telephone Franklin 546 

Honorary Trustees 

Sig Greenebaum Juda Newman Samuel I. Wormser 

Trustees 

Term expires Term expires 

May 1st May 1st 

Sylvan L. Bernstein 1918 Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld 1920 

Max J. Brandenstein ......1920 Leon G. Levy 1919 

Sidney M. Ehrman 1918 Maurice Liebmann 1918 

Mortimer Fleishhacker 1920 Miss Hattie Sheideman 1919 

Alexander Goldstein 1920 M. C. Sloss 1919 

D. J. Guggenhime 1919 Mrs. Jesse Steinhart 1918 

Abraham Haas 1918 Jacob Stern 1917 

Louis S. Haas 1919 

Superintendent of the Orphanage 
Dr. Samuel Langer 

Superintendent and Matron of the Home for the Aged 
Mr. and Mrs. Gustave Schnee 

— 16 — 



STANDING COMMITTEES 1917 

Applications and Admissions — Orphanage 

Alexander Goldstein, Chairman 

Abraham Haas Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld 

Applications and Admissions — Home 
Louis S. Haas, Chairman 
Leon G. Levy Maurice Liebmann 

House Committee — Orphanage 
D. J. Guggeahime, Chairman 
Sidney M. Ehrman Maurice Liebmann 

Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld Mrs. Jesse Steinhart 

House Committee — Home 
Max J. Brandenstein, Chairman 
Louis S. Haas Miss Hattie Sheideman 

Committee on Finance 
Jacob Stern, Chairman 
Max J. Brandenstein Abraham Haas 

Mortimer Fleishhacker Maurice Liebmann 

Committee on Real Estate and Improvements 
Abraham Haas, Chairman 
Alexander Goldstein Leon G. Levy 

Committee on Education and Employment 
Mrs. A. L. Lengfeld, Chairman 
Alexander Goldstein Miss Hattie Sheideman 

D. J. Guggenhime Mrs. Jesse Steinhart 

Committee on Membership 
Sylvan L. Bernstein, Chaiman 
Leon G. Levy Miss Hattie Sheideman 

Committee on Bequests and Legal Matters 
Sidney M. Ehrman, Chairman 
Sylvan L. Bernstein Louis S. Haas 

Special Visiting Committee 
Louis A. Schwabacher, Chairman 
Lawrence Arnstein Mrs. M. Esberg 

Mrs. S. M. Ehrman Mrs. M. S. Koshland 



LADIES' AUXILIARY 
President 

MRS. A. L. LENGFELD 
First Vice-President Corresponding Secretary 

MRS. MARCUS KOSHLAND MRS. ABRAHAM HAAS 

Second Vice-President Recording Secretary 

MRS. DAVID N. WALTER MRS. CARD RAISS 

Third Vice-President Treasurer 

MRS. LOUIS SLOSS MRS. SOPHIE LILIENTHAL 

Board of Managers 

MRS. ABRAHAM BROWN MRS. MARTIN A. MEYER 

MRS. SAMUEL DINKELSFIEL MRS. LOUIS W. NEUSTADTER 

MRS. JOSEPH EHRMAN MRS. ACHILLE ROOS 

MRS. SIDNEY M. EHRMAN MRS. DANIEL ROTH 

MRS. DAVID EISENBACH MRS. LUDWIG SCHWABACHER 

MRS. WILLIAM FRANK MRS. JOSEPH SILVERBERG 

MRS. J. J. GOTTLOB MRS. ISAAC N. WALTER 

MRS. LOUISA GREENEWALD MRS. LOUISE WORMSER 

MRS. A. LIEBENTHAL 

Honorary Managers 

MRS. SIMON BACHMAN MRS. CHARLES KEILUS 

'*RS. W. HIRSCHFELD MRS. H. K. ZEIMER 

— 17 — 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 



To the Members of the 

i Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society: 

Ladies and Gentlemen : 

The annual meeting of the members of this Society 
furnishes the one occasion when those whom you have 
entrusted with the direction of your beneficient enterprise 
can meet you collectively, and render to you an accounting 
and a report of the manner in which they have executed 
the trust which you have confided to them. At this meet- 
ing, too, the members are called upon to provide for the 
continued existence of the Board of Trustees, by selecting 
successors to the five trustees whose terms expire with the 
year now ending. The Nominating Committee has pre- 
sented as regular candidates for the vacancies thus created, 
the five trustees who are about to complete their three 
years' term of service. No one who is at all familiar with 
the earnest, devoted, and capable work done by the lady 
and the four gentlemen in question will need any assurance 
of the wisdom and good judgment exhibited by the Nomi- 
nating Committee in thus selecting its candidates. Un- 
happily, I am compelled to announce that death has inter- 
vened to prevent the re-election and the further service of 
one of the trustees thus placed in nomination. On Tuesday 
last, Mr. Sigmund Schwabacher was called to his final rest. 
This is not the time or the place for a eulogy of Mr. 
Schwabacher, or for any review of his loyal and valuable 
efforts in our work. The Board of Trustees will, in due 
course, give proper expression to the sentiments of loss and 
bereavement which fill the hearts of all of us. I cannot, 
however, let the occasion go by without adverting to the 
deep regret which is felt, particularly by the younger mem- 
bers of the Board, at the breaking of another link in the 
chain which connects the Jewish community of today with 
those noble and far-seeing men who typified the public- 
spirited and optimistic altruism of the western pioneer. 

As I have taken occasion to say in prior reports, it would 
be a waste of time to ask you to listen to any detailed state- 
ment of mine relative to the internal management of the 
Orphanage and the Old People's Home during the last 
year. Our aims and such success as may have been at- 
tained in realizing them are clearly set forth in the reports 
which will be presented to you by the superintendents of 

— 18 — 



these institutions. Whether the work has been done in 
such manner as to meet your demands and expectations, is 
a question that must be answered by you, rather than by 
the officers to whom you have delegated the task of admin- 
istration. I should, however, be doing violence to my 
own feelings, and to those of every trustee, if I did not say 
that the Board is under a sense of the deepest obligation 
and appreciation to Dr. Langer and to Mr. and Mrs Schnee 
for the single-minded and efficient performance of the 
duties committed to them. The earnest and capable co- 
operation of the staffs of the respective institutions also 
deserves more than the conventional word of approval. 

The financial status of the Society is set forth with clarity 
and detail in the report of the Secretary. A summary of 
the figures will show that, while the receipts for the year 
were slightly in excess of the expenditures, we were unable 
to conduct the Orphanage and the Home without consum- 
ing the larger part of the money received through donations 
and bequests. For a number of years the Board has felt 
that money thus given to the Society should not be used 
for meeting current expenses. Sound business policy and, 
we believe, a proper respect for the real desire of donors 
and testators require that funds given or bequeathed should 
become a part of the permanent investment fund of the 
Society, and that the ordinary running expenses should be 
met from our fixed income. This income includes, of 
course, such allotment as we may receive from the Feder- 
ation of Jewish Charities. The President of the Federation, 
at its recent meeting, pointed out that the annual contri- 
butions to the Federation were not sufficient in amount to 
enable adequate allotments to be made to the various 
constituent societies. In the last analysis, the cost of carry- 
ing on the work of these constituent societies must be defray- 
ed out of the collective subscriptions received by the Feder- 
ation from the community. Each of the societies is doing 
beneficial, indeed, necessary work, and if this work is to 
continue without impairment, the income of the Federation 
must be largely increased. A failure on the part of the 
Federation to receive adequate funds for distribution must 
hamper the activities of each of the constituent societies, 
including our own. For this reason, I take the liberty of 
urging upon all of you a careful perusal of the report of Mr. 
Hellman, President of the Federation, and of urging upon 
you the necessity of earnestly supporting the officers of 
the Federation in their efforts to obtain new and increased 
subscriptions. 

In my report of last year I spoke of the oft-mentioned 
need for new orphanage buildings, and announced that it 
was the intention of the Board to institute an active canvass 
for the purpose of obtaining funds to erect safe and proper 

— 19 — 



structures. Shortly thereafter, the Board, after applying 
for and obtaining the consent of the Federation of Jewish 
Charities, undertook such canvass. For this purpose the 
Board authorized the appointment of a committee consist- 
ing of Mr. Mortimer Fleishhacker as chairman, and Messrs. 
A. Haas, D. J. Guggenhime, S. M. Ehrman and Mark L. 
Gerstle. Mr. I. W. Hellman, Jr., President of the Feder- 
ation of Jewish Charities, and the President of this Society 
acted as ex officio member. At the outset the Board 
decided that a very careful study and survey of needs and 
requirements, as well as of location and construction of the 
proposed buildings, should lie made before beginning active 
work. For this reason, and for others which I need not now 
go into, it was concluded to ask for subscriptions, payable in 
five installments, except where donors preferred another 
mode of payment. The canvass was actively prose- 
cuted under the capable leadership of Mr. Fleishhacker, and 
resulted in the obtaining of subscriptions amounting to 
$370,220.00. In addition to this, the Society already had in 
its building fund the proceeds of prior donations for the 
same purpose, together with interest earned thereon, 
amounting to $5,838.34. Since the date covered by the 
Secretary's report, the Board has called for payment on the 
first installment of these subscriptions. Nearly all of the 
amount so called has already been paid, and the amount 
realized is being conservatively invested in income-bearing 
securities by our finance committee. Meanwhile the Board 
has appointed a committee which is proceeding to a 
thorough investigation of the various problems involved in 
the location and type of construction of the proposed new 
buildings. It is our intention to proceed with the erection 
of the new plant as rapidly as is consistent with a proper 
study and solution of the many difficult problems involved. 
The Board recognizes as fully as anyone can the urgent 
need of new structures, and will proceed as soon as it has 
acquired the information necessary to enable it to decide 
upon the best and wisest plan of action. 

For my own part, I may say that the response of the 
community to our appeal for this new building fund exceeds 
my most sanguine expectations. The liberal contributions 
made furnish new evidence of the impregnable place held 
by the Orphanage in the interest and affection of the com- 
munity. It gives to the Board new enthusiasm and courage 
to go on with the work committed to them. To the mem- 
bers of the community who have so generously met the 
appeal of the Orphanage, and to the members of the com- 
mittee, whose active and intelligent efforts brought about 
this splendid result, we, as members of the Society, owe 
the deepest gratitude. Let us now go forward, resolved 
to do the best that is in us to furnish for the children in 

— 20 — 



our charge a home that will enable us to give them, while 
they are with us, every factor of happiness and well-being, 
and to equip them for active, contented and useful life 
when they shall leave the shelter of our home to take their 
places in the world without. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

M. C. SLOSS, 

President. 






21 — 



PACIFIC HEBREW ORPHAN ASYLUM 
AND HOME SOCIETY 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1916 



SCHEDULE A. INCOME 

Donations 

James L. Flood $ 1,000.00 

Mrs. Lillie S. Guggenhime 250.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Moses M. Heller 250.00 

Sigmund, Bella and Sarah Schwabacher Trust 

Fund 188.00 

Albert M. Bender 50.00 

Mrs. Milton Salz 50.00 

, Anglo and London Paris National Bank 25.00 

David Felsenthal— Fillmore, Calif 18.00 

J. W. Behrendt 15.00 

Anonymous per. S'upt. Langer 10.00 

Mrs. G. K. Rider — Sacramento 5.00 

Mrs. A. Cook 5.00 

$ 1,866.00 

Bequests and Donations in Memory 

Bequest of Herman W. Walter $10,000.00 

Bequest of Elizabeth V. Kohn 2,500.00 

Bequest of Samuel Wolf Levy 500.00 

Bequest of Johanna Hart 100.00 

In Memory of William Haas 2,000.00 

In Memory of John William Ehrman 1,000.00 

In Memory of Sig. L. and Olga M. Ackerman. 1,000.00 
In Memory of Herman and Pauline Eppinger. 50.00 

In Memory of Sigmund Blath 2.50 

$17,152.50 

Donations to Technical Training Permanent Fund 

In Memory of Siegfried Nickelsburg $ 1,000.00 

Anonymous contribution 100.00 

Samuel Samter , 50.00 

$.1,150.00 

Donations to Home for Aged 

Mrs. Lillie S. Guggenhime $ 250.00 

Mrs. Samuel Aftergut 20.00 

$ 270.00 

Donations to Permanent Building Fund 
In Memory of Lewis P. Wiel $ 500.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities 
Allotment for fiscal year 1916 $33,500.00 

Children's Aid 

From State of California towards support of 

Orphaned and half orphaned children $ 5,969.79 

From County Aid 2,646.55 

From parents and relatives 2,401.20 

$11,017.54 

— 22 — 



Home Inmates Aid 
From Sundry Inmates $ 32.50 

Home Endowment 
From Louis Mendel $ 500.00 

Rents 

From Property on Silver Ave. and Mission St -. ..$ 618.00 

Asylum Expense Returned 412.24 

Asylum Insurance Returned 39.27 

Home Expense Returned 58.82 

Home Insurance Returned 72.66 

Interest 
Interest on bonds and savings bank deposits.. $ 8,023.14 
Less Interest due Special Funds: 

Herman Behrendt Fund $200.00 

Leopold Cahn Fund . 120.00 

Premium Fund 324.12 

Anspacher Musical Fund 360.00 

Technical Training Fund 257.42 

Written off bonds 114.88 $1,376.42 $6,646.72 



Total Income $73,836.25 

EXPENDITURES 

Orphanage Maintenance $48,694.57 

Orphanage Improvements 778.04 

Orphanage Taxes 1,675.35 

Orphanage Insurance 1,931.41 



Total cost maintenance of Orphanage $53,079.37 

Home Maintenance $ 9,733.90 

Home Improvements 365.57 

Home Taxes 473.69 

Home Insurance 1,333.57 

Home Street Work 661.21 



Total cost maintenance of Home $12,567.94 

Office Expense $ 1,919.07 



Total Expenditures $67,566.38 

Income $73,836.25 

Expenditures 67,566.38 



$ 6,269.87 
Less Special Fund Donations 

Technical Training Fund $1,150.00 

Permanent Building Fund 500.00 

Written off on Bonds 1,095.00 

$ 2,745.00 

Surplus $ 3,524.87 

SCHEDULE B. SPECIAL FUNDS 

Receipts and Expenditures 
RECEIPTS 
Technical Training Fund 

Anonymous donation per S. Langer $ 10,00 

P. H. O. A. Printery Payment 50.00 

$ 60.00 

— 23 — 



Band Instrument Fund 
Retail Dry Goods Assn. of San Francisco $ 85.00 

Orphanage Special Donations 
Scholarship Fund — 

Donation from Dr. Rene Bine 20.00 

Chanukah Gifts — 

Donations from Mrs. Louis S'chwabacher $10.00 

" Mrs. Lulius Cahn 10.00 

" Mrs. Leopold Cahn 10.00 

" Mrs. Meyer I. Cahn 10.00 

" Mrs. Carl Raiss 15.00 

" Mrs. D. S. Lissberger 5.00 



60.00 

Seder Gifts- 
Donations from Mrs. S. Bachman 50.00 

Library Books — 

Donations from J. H. Neustadter 50.00 

Children's Picnics — 

Donations from Ladies' Auxiliary $195.38 

" " Mrs. Jesse W. Lilienthal 5.00 

" Mrs. Jesse H. Steinhart 10.00 

■ 210.38 



Children's Gifts- 
Donations from Elizabeth Greenebaum $25.00 

" Mrs. H. L. Judell 10.00 



Sewing and School Gifts — 

Donations from Ladies' Auxiliary $51.25 

" Mrs. S. Furth 10.00 



35.00 



61.25 



EXPENDITURES 
Herman Behrendt Fund 

Prize for 1915 awarded Mitchell Steigman $ 200.00 

Leopold Cahn Fund 

Distribution to children in accordance with provisions 

of said Fund 80.00 

Premium Fund 

Sundry prizes and other expenditures 340.50 

Abraham and Babette Anspacher Musical Fund 

Tuition expenses of Brass Band 473.00 

Technical Training Fund 

Sundry Expenditures 144.61 

Band Instrument Fund 

Sundry expenditures 37.74 

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 

ASSETS 

Cash with Treasurer $13,048.11 

Bonds 
Par Value Book Value 

5,000 Omnibus Cable Railway 6% $ 4,500.00 

30,000 Spring Valley Water Co 4% 26,345.00 

10,000 Sutter St. Railway 5% 9,500.00 

5,000 Northern R. R. of California 5% 5,150.00 

10,000 Pacific Electric Railway 5% 9,000.00 

5,000 Los Angeles Electric Co. 5% 4,500.00 

15,000 Atchison, Topeka & S'ta Fe 4% 13,800.00 

5,000 Oregon Ry. and Navigation Co.. .4% 4,600.00 

— 24 — 



11,000 Union Pacific Railroad 4% 10,340.00 

5,000 Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 4% 4,500.00 

15,000 Richelieu Investment Co 5% 15,000.00 

5,000 S. F. & San Joaquin Valley RR..5% 5,100.00 

4,000 S. F. Gas and Electric Co 4%% 3,280.00 

5,000 S. F. & North Pacific Railway.. 5% 5,000.00 

5,000 Los Angeles Railway Co 5% 5,000.00 

11,000 Southern Pacific Railroad 4% 9,570.00 

11,000 City of Stockton Municipal Imp.. 5% 11,550.00 

10,000 State of California Highway 4% 9,825.00 

12,000 City of Portland, Pub. Auditorium 4% 11,880.00 



179,000 $168,440.00 

Savings Bank Deposits 

Security Savings Bank $ 641.71 

Mutual Savings Bank 438.94 

German Savings and Loan Society 1,096.07 

Union Trust Co. of San Francisco 2,231.04 

Savings Union Bank and Trust Co 907.47 

Hibernia Savings and Loan S'ociety 1,058.33 

French Savings Bank 640.64 

$7,014.20 

New Orphanage Building Fund Assets 

Union Trust Co. of San Francisco $ 5,838.34 

Anglo California Trust Co 500.00 

$ 6,338.34 

Cash with Superintendent of Orphanage $ 150.00 

Cash with Superintendent of Home 100.00 

Realty and Buildings, Book Value 1.00 

Assessed Value Orphanage Realty $62,500.00 

Orphanage Improvements 10,500.00 

Home realty 15,800.00 

Home Improvements 4,000.00 

Total $195,091.65 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Account $132,000.00 

Contingent Fund 21,052.41 

Total Capital for Use of Society $153,052.41 

Special Funds 

Herman Behrendt Fund $ 5,273.25 

Leopold Cahn Fund 3,187.59 

Premium Fund 8,427.16 

Band Uniform Fund 62.30 

Anspacher Musical Fund 9,000.00 

Band Instrument Fund 741.81 

Technical Training Fund 6,891.97 

Orphans Trust Fund 1,225.00 

New Orphanage Building Fund 6,338.34 

41,147.42 

Federalon of Jewish Charities, A/c. expenses 891.82 

Total $195,091.65 

Respectfully submitted, 

MEYER H. LEVY, 

Secretary. 

— 25 — 







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— 27 -— 



PACIFIC HEBREW ORPHAN ASYLUM 
AND HOME SOCIETY 



SUBSCRIPTIONS TO NEW ORPHANAGE 
BUILDING FUND 



NAME AMOUNT 

Abraham son, Hugo $ 300.00 

Ackerman, Mrs. Emma R. 1,000.00 

Anonymous 5,000.00 

Arnstein, Ludwig 1,000.00 

Aronson A 1,000.00 

Bachman, Arthur 1,500.00 

Bachman, Mrs. Simon 5,000.00 

Ballin, Maurice 150.00 

Baruch, Albert 500.00 

Baruch, Albert Leonard . . 100.00 
Baruch, Miss Frances Helen 50.00 

Baruch, Frederick 500.00 

Baruch, Fred, Jr 150.00 

Baruch, Miss Mary Sachs 100.00 
Baruch, Miss Ruth Margaret 50.00 

Bauer, Samuel 500.00 

Bender, Albert M 500.00 

Bernstein, Sylvan L 500.00 

Bissinger, Newton 500.00 

Bissinger, Samuel 5,000.00 

Bloch, Louis 500.00 

Block, Leo 250.00 

Bloom, Jonas 5,000.00 

Blum, Moses 1,000.00 

Blumlein, Jacob 500.00 

Brandenstein, Alfred J 500.00 

Brandenstein, Edward 1,000.00 

Brandenstein, Henry U 500.00 

Brandenstein, Manfred .. 1,500.00 

Brandenstein, Max J 2,500.00 

Brenner, Gustave 1,000.00 

Brown, Morris 5,000.00 

Bush, Philip 20.00 

Cahn, Mrs. Babette 500.00 

Cahn, Julius 1 500.00 

Cahn, Leopold 1 500.00 

Cahn, Mr. and Mrs. 

Mayer 1 2,500.00 

Charles, Max 250.00 

Clayburgh, Herbert E 500.00 

Clayburgh, Leo J . . 500.00 

Mnkelspiel, Samuel 1,000.00 

Eastern Outfitting Co 100.00 

Ehrman, Albert L 2,500.00 

Ehrman, Alexis L 1,000.00 

Ehrman, Alfred 1,000.00 

Ehrman, Joseph 2,000.00 

Ehrman, M 2,500.00 

Ehrman, Sidney M 5,000.00 

Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. 

S. W 1,500.00 

Eisenbach Company 250.00 

Esberg, Mrs. Matilda and 

Alfred I. and Milton H. . . 5,000.00 

Fleishhacker, Mrs. Delia. . 2,500.00 

Fleishhacker, Herbert 5,000.00 

Fleishhacker, Mr. and Mrs. 

Mortimer 10,000.00 

Fleishman, Mrs. Carrie H. 1,000.00 

Fontana, M. J 500.00 

Foorman, Isaac S 500.00 

Fox, Mrs. Sarah 500.00 



NAME AMOUNT 

Frank, Albert 1,000.00 

Frank, Mrs. Josephine S'... 200.00 

Frankenheimer Bros 500.00 

Friedlander, Louis 250.00 

Fries, Mr. and Mrs. 

William 2,500.00 

Friedman, Meyer 250.00 

Furth, Mrs. Simon 2,000.00 

Geist, W 25.00 

Gerstle, Mrs. Hannah 5,000.00 

Gerstle, Mark L 2,500.00 

Gerstle, William L. 1,500.00 

Goldstein, Alexander 2,500.00 

Goldstein, Sanford L 2,500.00 

Gottlob, J. J 500.00 

Greenebaum, Joseph L. . . 250.00 
Greenebaum, Sigmund and 

Morris 1,500.00 

Guggenhime, Berthold 1,000.00 

Guggenhime, David J 2,500.00 

Guggenhime, Mr. and Mrs. 

Leon 3,000.00 

Gunst, Mr. and Mrs. M. A. 10,000.00 

Gunst, Morgan A 1,000.0,0 

Haas, Abraham 5,000.00 

Haas, Mrs. Bertha 5,000.00 

Haas, Charles W 1,000.00 

Haas, Louis S 500.00 

Haas, Walter A 500.00 

Hart, Bruno 2,500.00 

Hart, Julien 1,500.00 

Hecht, Mrs. Alice A 1,000.00 

Heller, Mrs. Belle 350.00 

Heller, E. S 2,500.00 

Heller, Leonard 150.00 

Heller, Moses 2,500.00 

Heller, Sig. M 1,000.00 

Heller, Mr. and Mrs. S. W. 2,500.00 

Hellman, I. W., Jr 5,000.00 

Hellman, Isaias W 15,000.00 

Henderson, Mrs. Esther G. 1,000.00 

Hirsch, Charles 100.00 

Hyman, Joseph 1,000.00 

Hyman, Morris 1,000.00 

Jacobi, J. J 1,000.00 

Jacobs, Henry A 150.00 

Kahn, Frederick 1,000.00 

Kahn, Ira 1,000.00 

Katschinski, Bernard 500.00 

Katten, Simon 500.00 

Kaufmann, William 1,000.00 

Kohn, Mrs. Eva Heller .. 2,000.00 

Kohn, Phillip 1,000.00 

Koshland, M. S 5,000.00 

Kutner, Abraham L 1,000.00 

Kutner, Alfred 1,500.00 

Kutner, Mrs. Caroline .... 2,500.00 

Lavenson, Albert S 1,000.00 

Lengfeld, Mrs. A, L 1,000.00 

Levi, Mr. and Mrs. H 2,000.00 

Levi, Milton J 500.00 

Levi, Henry 500.00 



— 28 — 



NAME AMOUNT 

Levison, J. B 1,000.00 

Levy, Jules 500.00 

Levy, Leon G 250.00 

Levy, Mr. and Mrs. Louis. 20.00 

Lewin, Leon 500.00 

Lewis, Isabelle 250.00 

Liebes, Isaac 5,000.00 

Liebmann, Maurice 1,250.00 

Lilienthal, Bertha G 500.00 

Lilienthal, Jesse W 2,500.00 

Lilienthal, J. W. Jr 250.00 

Lilienthal, Sam 250.00 

Lilienthal, Sophie 500.00 

Livingston Bros., Inc 2,000.00 

Mack, Adolph 1,000.00 

Mack, Jules J 2,500.00 

Manheim, Henry S 500.00 

Marx, Melville 250.00 

Mayer, Mr. and Mrs. 

Henry L 500.00 

Meertief, Abraham 1,000.00 

Meyer, Albert 2,500.00 

Meyer, Rev. Martin A. . . . 500.00 

Meyer, Mrs. Selda 10,000.00 

Meyerfeld, Morris 2,500.00 

Mitau, Mr. and Mrs. M. . . . 250.00 

Moss, Isaac 500.00 

Neustadter, David 2,000.00 

Neustadter, Louis W 1,000.00 

Neustadter, Newton H. . . 1,000.00 

Newbauer, George S 500.00 

Newbauer, Julien H 750.00 

Newbauer, Sanford R 750.00 

Newhouse, Mrs. Henry 250.00 

Newman, Juda 2,000.00 

Newman, Sigmund J 2,000.00 

Nickelsburg, Mrs. Sig 1,000.00 

Nuttall, Mrs. J. R. K 1,000.00 

Patek, Fred 500.00 

Prager, Isaac 50.00 

Prager, Lesser 250.00 

Raiss, Carl 2,500.00 

Roos, Mr. and Mrs. A. . . . 2,500.00 

Roos, George H 1,000.00 

Roos, Leon L 300.00 

Roos, Mr. and Mrs. 

Robert L 250.00 

Rosenbaum, Albert M 1,000.00 

Rosenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. 

Chas. W 1,000.00 

Rosenbaum, Mrs. Emma . 2,500.00 
Rosenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. 

Samuel M 1,000.00 

Rosenberg, Abraham, 

Adolph and Max L 5,000.00 

Rosenblatt, Mr. and Mrs. 

Arthur S 250.00 

Rosenstock, Mrs. S. W. . . 1,500.00 

Rosenthal, Isaac L 1,000.00 

Rosenthal, N 500.00 

Roth, Mrs. Daniel 2,000.00 

Rothschild, John 500.00 

Sachs, D. M 200.00 

Sachs, Edgar 200.00 



NAME AMOUNT 

Sachs, Miss Hattie 200.00 

Sachs, Mrs. Mary 1,000.00 

Sachs, Sanford 2,500.00 

Sahlein, Henry 1,250.00 

Samson, Mrs. Rudolph ... 2,000.00 

Samson, Walter J 100.00 

Sapiro, Aaron L 5,000.00 

Saroni, Louis 2,500.00 

Scheeline, Simon C 1,000.00 

Scheeline, Sol E 500.00 

Schlessinger, Bert 150.00 

Schlessinger, Charles 100.00 

Schwabacher, Mrs. A 1,500.00 

Schwabacher, Albert E... 250.00 

Schwabacher, Mrs. Bella.. 2,500.00 

Schwabacher, Mrs. Carrie. 2,500.00 

Schwabacher, Frank 500.00 

Schwabacher, James H. . . 500.00 
Schwabacher, Mr. and Mrs. 

Louis A 2,500.00 

Schwabacher, Sigmund & 

Rose 5,000.00 

Shainwald, Richard S 1,000.00 

Silverberg, J. S 1,500.00 

Simon, Mrs. Hattie 2,500.00 

Sinsheimer, B 500.00 

Sinsheimer, Henry 2,500.00 

Sloss Family 5,000.00 

Sondheimer, M 2,000.00 

Stahl, Adolf o 5,000.00 

Steinhart, Mr. and Mrs. 

Jesse H 500.00 

Stern, Mrs. Abraham 2,500.00 

Stern, Mrs. Jacob 2,500.00 

Stern, Jacob 5,000.00 

Stern, Louis 2,500.00 

Stern, Sig 5,000.00 

Stettheimer, Walter W. . . 1,000.00 

Strassburger, Isaac 2,500.00 

Sussman, Mrs. Emilie 2,500.00 

Tauszky, Edmund 50.00 

Triest, Jesse E 1,000.00 

Triest, Joseph 500.00 

Triest, Frank 250.00 

Unna, Harry 50.00 

Waldeck, Mr. and Mrs. 

Herman 1,000.00 

Walter, Clarence R 2,500.00 

Walter, Mrs. Hannah 2,500.00 

Walter, Isaac N 2,500.00 

Wangenheim, Emil S 1,000.00 

Wangenheim, Sol 2,500.00 

Weinstock, Harris 5,000.00 

Wiel, Eli H 500.00 

Wise, Otto Irving 500.00 

Wolbach, Karl 500.00 

Wolff, Moise L 500.00 

Wolf, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. 200.00 
Wormser, Mrs. Louise and 

Samuel 1 2,500.00 

Zellerbach, J. C 1,000.00 

Zellerbach, Mrs. Theresa.. 2,000.00 



— 29 — 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
OF THE ORPHANAGE 



To the Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society : 

Annual reports generally aim to summarize the efforts 
and conditions of a preceding year. They offer this ac- 
counting in justification of present appeals and as an earn- 
est of what may be accomplished in the future. Our fi- 
nancial and statistical reports this year offer no unusual 
difficulty. But this supplementary message stubbornly 
seeks to turn away from the past and to look toward the 
future. Two years ago a sentence was enviously quoted 
from the report of the rebuilt Albany Orphan Asylum, ex- 
plaining why a child-caring institution never grows old. 
And last year it seemed necessary to relate, in detail, how 
wastefully wornout and how dangerous our building has 
become. This year there is a strong temptation to use 
time and space for exultation over the ready generosity 
with which the community has responded to the request 
for money with which to rebuild. And a stronger tempta- 
tion to prophesy the glories of the near future. 

It is from careful study of the past, however, that 
knowledge may be obtained on which to base wise plans 
for the future. So elementary a matter as how many to 
plan for depends on a knowledge of causes of dependency 
and movement of population. Location depends on educa- 
tional needs, which themselves depend on vocational con- 
siderations. Structures and equipment will be influenced 
by location. Light on this whole series of interrelated 
problems can be obtained only from careful study of past 
experience. So that it is better as well as safer to retain 
in the annual report, the attitude of the careful student; 
than to assume the pose of the inspired prophet. 

Last year attention was especially drawn to the fact that 
our register has been increasing steadily, in spite of greater 
rigor in granting admission. Another influence has been 
exerted with increasing force, by insisting that surviving 
parents shall, wherever possible, contribute something 
toward the support of their children. Those who wish 
merely to use this Institution to escape the performance 
of this natural duty, are thus constrained to remove their 
children. This has made room for many who could not 
otherwise have been accommodated. Notwithstanding all 

— 30 — 






Girls 


Total 


98 


191 


20 


40 


15 


39 


103 


192 



these things, our register continues to grow. The average 
daily register for 1916 was 193, or five more than last year. 

Boys 

Register, January 1, 1916, 93 

Admitted 20 

Discharged 24 

Register, December 31, 1916. ... 89 

The total number of different children cared for was 231. 
The largest register during the year was 199. The smallest 
was 186. Again this year the number of children has in- 
creased during the opening weeks of the year, and was 209 
on March 1 — the largest in the history of the Institution, 
as far as records show. 

The following table of causes for discharge is important : 

Boys Girls 

Graduates, Self-Supporting, but living with 

relatives 6 

Graduates, Self-Supporting, in boarding 

homes 2 2 

Returned to family able to provide : 

On application from family. .. . 10 3 

Forced Withdrawals 2 3 

Returned to remarried parent: 

On application from parent. ... 4 4 

Forced Withdrawals 1 

Died 1 

The ten graduates had schooling as follows : 

Boys Girls 

High School Graduates 4 1 

High School Course not completed 2 

Special Vocational Course completed 1 

Elementary School not completed 2 

They are now engaged as follows : 

Boys Girls 

Commercial Work , 3 

Mechanic 1 

Agriculture 1 

Elevator Boys 2 

College Student 1 

Normal School Student 1 

Interior Decorator 1 

HEALTH : — The year has been a very trying one in 
health conditions. The city has been troubled with suc- 
cessive infections which have kept us anxious and busy 
with protective precautions. It opened with a prevalent 
streptococcus infection which persisted through almost the 

— 31 — 



whole year. Every case of cold was promptly isolated 
under observation and treatment, so that our infirmary was 
seldom empty. During the first and third quarters, it was 
full nearly all the time. The only serious case was that of 
Jennie Niefeld, who developed a virulent pneumonia on 
October 16, and passed away on October 26. The first 
two months of the year were also troubled by an inroad 
of contagious conductivities. A few cases of mumps, 
measles and chickenpox added to our troubles during the 
year, but all the infections were promptly checked. More 
serious, from the nature of the disease, were three cases of 
scarlet fever. We were able, however, to confine the attack 
to these original cases. One case of active pulmonary 
tuberculosis was discovered, and the girl was sent to the 
Arequipa Sanatorium on May 5. Her excellent progress 
has proven the wisdom of allowing her to remain until the 
cure is complete. Finally one of the numerous tonsil 
cases sent to Mt. Zion Hospital for operation was found 
to have the more serious infliction of a tuberculous kidney. 
It was removed on November 8, and the boy is now in very 
good condition. 

Again we must congratulate ourselves on the excellent 
medical attention which has been rendered. The skill and 
service which have been so unstintedly put at our disposal 
by Dr. Wiel and Dr. Ash have enabled us to keep our 
children in good health. When one recalls that we have 
cared for 231 different children in the course of the year, or 
for an average of 193 children for every day in the year, 
all attending the public schools, it will be realized that 
even for us, so unusual a list of cases as those mentioned 
above indicate a very high average of health. The great 
bulk of the work is informational and preventive. 

A word of appreciation is due here to the service rendered 
by our nurse. A year such as this is a severe strain. The 
temptation is very great to take a chance with a trifling 
ailment, like a cough or a cold, especially when nineteen 
or twenty similar cases are already segregated under obser- 
vation, and twice that number have been watched and dis- 
missed in the same month. The drudgery of keeping 
records of feeding and of sterilizing dishes and clothing, is 
itself a severe strain. It is only a strong sense of duty, 
combined with professional efficiency and high humanity, 
which will carry one through the ordeal. 

Another change has been made in the method of exami- 
nation and treatment by specialists. All the children are 
sent to Mt. Zion clinic for examination of eye, ear, nose 
and throat. 

Dr. Baer and Dr. Flynn have done an immense amount 
of work, at no small expenditure of time and effort. To 
Miss Meininger — or rather, to Mrs. Bachman, too much 

— 32 — 



thanks is due for her tact and skill in organizing a satis- 
factory routine for this work. 

The staff of Mt. Zion Hospital has earned our gratitude 
for the large amount of work which has been done for our 
wards. Our patients have been promptly and well attend- 
ed. And not only our children but on several occasions 
former inmates and some parents were promptly and suc- 
cessfully treated, at our request. 

HOUSE & GROUNDS .-—This topic requires but passing 
mention now. In view of the outlook for a new plant, it 
is needless to dwell on the condition of the old one, beyond 
breathing the pious hope that the boilers and plumbing 
will hold out as long as we need them. And with every- 
body eloquent about the high prices, there will be surprise, 
not that it cost us $1.25 a year more to maintain each child 
in 1916 than in 1915, but that the increase was not greater. 

EDUCATION: — In the matter of education, however, 
we cannot mark time, waiting for our new home. Children 
are going out all the time, and it is our work to see that 
they go out as well equipped as possible. Of course, the 
greater number of discharges are not really "graduates. >? 
Twenty-eight of last year's discharges went back to parents 
able, if not always willing to support them, and continued 
in school. Our most anxious problems among so-called 
"alumni" are not from among real graduates, but from 
those whose training was undertaken by their own people. 
The conflict between parental ideas and educational ideals 
in the Institution sometimes erupts into anonymous letters 
and often into foolish complaints. When the parental 
methods are given unchecked sway by the discharge of the 
children from the Institution, the result is too often dis- 
astrous. This is the chief reason for the existence of the 
after-care worker. A word of grateful recognition is due 
here to Mr. Aaron L. Sapiro and to Mr. Harris Weinstock 
for their generosity in giving the money to support this 
after-care work for a year. 

This conflict between standards and no standards in 
health care, scholarship and honor adds the more greatly 
to our difficulties because of the importance we attach to 
preventing estrangement between the children and their 
relatives. It must be admitted that the latters' influence 
is not always exerted in the direction of high ideals. To 
a certain type of parents, we represent officialdom, and 
officialdom is always fair game. This attitude is com- 
municated, not at all subtly, to the children. To meet the 
situation, we are extending the plan of having many picked 
people, who are not in any way officially employed in the 
Institution, form individual friendship with selected 
children. They thus establish themselves in about the 

— 33 — 



same position to the youngsters that the relatives them- 
selves occupy. From their attitude and example the 
children can learn that the restraints and self-control we 
urge upon them are good social standards, and not merely 
official tyranny. It is not easy to get helpers of this kind. 
It is easier to come once in a while with the hands full of 
gifts, than to come steadily without bribes, and often 
enough to piece the shell of childish reserve. That we have 
secured a number of such helpers is one of the great 
services which the Ladies' Auxiliary has rendered during 
the last year, in addition to its traditional work. 

Aside from this plan, there has been no alteration in 
agencies or methods of education. The public schools, 
from kindergarten to college, supply the necessary in- 
struction, which we continue to supplement at home, as 
heretofore, with religious, social, vocational, physical 
culture and recreational provision. It is interesting to 
note, however, how diversified are the schools which serve 
us as soon as the stage of specialization is reached — that 
is, as soon as the sixth year is passed. Some children con- 
tinue in their old schools. The majority transfer to 
Crocker, a "pre-vocational" school. After that, they 
scatter to Lowell, Girls', Commerce, Polytechnic, Lux and 
an agricultural course at San Luis Obispo. 

There remains now but to extend the sincerest thanks to 
the members of our loyal and efficient staff, and to the 
numerous friends and helpers who have aided and cheered 
us through another year of striving. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

SAMUEL LANGER, 

Superintendent. J 



— 34 — 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
OF THE HOME 



To the President, Officers and Members of the 

Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asylum and Home Society : 

Ladies and Gentlemen: 

Another mile-stone has been turned, and another year 
has passed since we assembled here to listen to the various 
reports of the Officers and Managers of our two beloved 
institutions, the Orphanage, that rears the Fatherless and 
prepares them to enter the world well equipped to under- 
take the battles of life — and the Home, that ministers to the 
needs of the destitute aged and decrepit, without a doubt 
the two most worthy charitable organizations maintained 
in the city. 

We are grateful to a merciful Providence that permits 
us to share in this Godly work and to be able to be present at 
this meeting to give to you an inventory for the year 1916. 
We say " inventory' ' because an annual report, if anything, 
is but a balance sheet similar to the ones issued by mer- 
cantile establishments, the difference only being in the 
nature of business transacted. While commercial houses 
deal in goods and merchandise, we deal with human distress 
and our balance sheet can but show whether or not the 
year was profitable by gain or loss contained in these 
reports. In using the word "profitable" we do not intend 
to imply the results to be measured by dollars and cents, 
but to be ascertained by actual results as to how nearly an 
institution succeeds, in attaining those ends for which it 
is in existence. 

A personal visit to the Home by those who do not take 
an active part in its management, and an inspection of the 
surroundings and a confidential talk with the old folks will 
disclose a very happy family. Any one of the inmates 
would be glad to impart the pleasant information that he 
or she is absolutely contented and that everything is being 
done for them to make them comfortable and happy. 

Pardon me if I disgress here for a moment to read a 
couple of letters similar to ones that come to us quite 
frequently : 

S'an Francisco, Cal., June 20, 1916. 
Dear Friend: 

I take this means of thanking you and your husband for the 
many kind things you have done for me since I have been in the 
home. 

— 35 — 



It is impossible for me to find words to express my apprecia- 
tion, but I know that if my dear Mother or Father were there in 
your places they could do no more for me than your dear folks 
have and I trust I will be spared to show my appreciation to you 
in some little way. 

With a thousand thanks and I trust the Lord will spare you 
and that He will bless you both. 

Your true friend, 



San Francisco, Cal.. September 2nd, 1916. 
Mr. & Mrs. Schnee, 

Dear Friends: — Only a very small tribute of gratitude to the 
dear ones who have made my life happy and also all the inmates 
of our dear Home. I cannot find words to thank you, so I think 
I can better express it in this manner. 

I have spent nearly a year under your loving care and I am 
sure I have been happy and contented — thanks to your generous 
and kind treatment and I pray God may spare you long in your 
Mission of Love and Mercy to the poor and sick — and that your 
health will be restored and that you may live to see your wedded 
life in Silver and Gold — yes, even to your Diamond Wedding, and 
if the Lord would only spare me to share your kindness and care. 
This is my earnest prayer. 

Once again wishing you both and all your near and dear re- 
lations, and also to each member of the Board of Directors of our 
Home my most heartfelt good wishes for a happy New Year and 
many, many of them. 

With love to all, I remain gratefully, 

From the contents of these letters you can readily for- 
give us if we claim the year was profitable. We do not 
wish it, however, understood that we claim any credit for 
ourselves — far be it from our thoughts. All the credit 
belongs to the managing directors, the Ladies' Auxiliary, 
the House Committee which is composed of Messrs. M. J. 
Brandenstein, Louis S. Haas and Miss Hattie Scheideman — 
all of whom have labored indefatigably in carrying out the 
ideals of what they consider a Home for Aged People should 
be— and to the generous public who provide the means. 

Our share is indeed trifling, we merely dispense the good 
things provided by others — hence the least deserving of 
mention. 

Of course, where there is gain, losses will occur, as the 
Grim Reaper does and will claim his share, and the past 
year has been no exception. But it must be borne in mind 
that the inmates, when entering the Home, must be 65 years 
of age or over, and some when admitted are in that state 
of health which is beyond any medical or mortal help, 
consequently the mortality rate is at times higher than 
could be desired. Of the loss sustained during 1916, two 
inmates passed away below the allotted three score and ten, 
one of whom having been at the Home but 16 months, and 
the other 29 months. Of the others who passed away all 
lived beyond their allotted time, their ages ranging from 72 

— 36 — 



to 97 years and their sojourn at the Home was from twenty- 
eight months to twenty years. 

During the year 1916, the Home provided shelter for 41 
old people. Seven were called to their Eternal Home, and 
three left to live with relatives, thus leaving us at the close 
of the year with 31 inmates, comprising 19 gentlemen and 
12 ladies. 

The names and ages of those departed being: 

Aged Died Time in Home 

Fanny Bramson 72 Feb. 16th 7 Yrs. 

Abraham Marcuse 68 June 2nd 2 Yrs. 5 Mos. 

Sophie Herzberg 97 June 7th 20 Months 

Esther Samuels 84 Aug. 5th 18 Yrs. 8 Mos. 

Sigmund Fisher 79 Aug. 27th 2 Yrs. 4 Mos. 

Chas. Liebert 67 Sept. 8th 1 Yr. 4 Mos. 

Joseph Dryer 85 Dec. 23rd 10 Yrs. 3 Mos. 

May their Souls rest in peace. 

At this writing, in studying the personnel of the Old 
Folks, we feel exceedingly encouraged and are happy to 
say that with but one exception, all bear that glow of health 
which leads us to hope for a large decrease in the mortality 
rate. This is not in the way of an apology, for everything 
possible is done by the institution to conserve the health 
and prolong the lives of the inmates. No expenses are 
spared for medical attention or nursing, nor is anything 
overlooked that would tend to disprove the old adage "That 
the young may die, while the old must die." The hope as 
above expressed is our deep and genuine attachment to 
those in our care, as the final parting with them is indeed 
the hardest task of all. 

The unexpected demise of our beloved Trustee, Mr. 
Sigmund Schwabacher, which occurred on March 20th, has 
put the Home in deep mourning. Mr. Schwabacher by his 
lovable manner and generous heart has endeared himself 
to all of us and was much loved by everyone of our inmates, 
he having faithfully served on the committee of applications 
for the Home for many years, and his just and merciful 
dealings with the indigent aged has indeed stamped him as 
one of God's Noblemen. We personally feel his loss very 
keenly, and will sorely miss his ever kind advice. His 
memory will be cherished forever and we pray the Al- 
mighty to grant him eternal peace — Amen. 

The necessity of having Street work done and some 
other needed improvements on the Silver Ave. property has 
naturally increased the expenditures and although the high 
standard of service had been strictly adhered to yet the 
actual maintenance expenses show a decrease of $386.20 
over those of last year. This was brought about by strict 

— 37 — 



economy in overhead expenses, and by intensified culti- 
vation of the spare lands surrounding the Home, on which 
we raised all kinds of vegetables, and in conjunction there- 
with conduct a poultry yard from which we gather fresh 
eggs, etc., for the Home's consumption. 

During the past year we received several donations in 
the shape of dinners and coffee parties and also entertain- 
ments for the old people, all of which has been properly 
acknowledged, but we desire at this time to extend to these 
donors, on behalf of our inmates, our most sincere thanks 
for the good cheer and joy they bring into the hearts of 
our large family. 

We tender thanks to the management of the Mt. Zion 
Hospital and the visiting physicians for the kind care and 
attention given to our inmates in their ilnesses and also to 
all those who remember the Home in various ways. 

In conclusion, we sincerely trust that Almighty God will 
bless you all — Officers and supporters of this noble Insti- 
tution. May you all enjoy good health, long life, and great 
prosperity and may the noble work carried on by you go 
forward to ever greater progress. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

GUSTAVE SCHNEE, 

Superintendent. 



&8 — 



Mount Zion Hospital 

Incorporated November 5, 1887 



President Treasurer 

J. B. LEVISON JOSEPH S. SILVERBERG 

Vice-President Secretary 

ALBERT E. CASTLE MEYER H. LEVY 

Directors 
Term Expires Term Expires 

April April 

Frederick Baruch 1920 Leon Kauf fman 1918 

Samuel Bissinger 1919 J. B. Levison 1919 

Albert E. Castle 1919 Morris Meyerfeld, Jr 1918 

William L. Gerstle 1920 Walter J. Samson 1919 

Sanford L. Goldstein 1919 Louis A. Sehwabacher 1919 

Charles W. Haas 1918 Joseph S. Silverberg. ..... .1918 

E. S. Heller 1920 Judge M. C. Sloss 1920 

Joseph Hyman 1918 Adolfo Stahl 1920 

Simon Katten 1918 

STANDING COMMITTEES— 1917 
Executive Committee 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 
Frederick Baruch W. L. Gerstle 

A. E. Castle Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr. 

Mrs, Albert L. Ehrman J. S. Silverberg 

Finance Committee 
Morris Meyerfeld, Jr., Chairman 
Leon Kauf fman J S. Silverberg 

Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
E. S. Heller, Chairman 
Mrs. S. L. Goldstein Louis A. Sehwabacher 

Committee on Nurses 
W. L. Gerstle, Chairman 
Mrs. A. Brown Mrs. Florence Schloss 

Mrs. William Haas 

Purchasing Committee 
Frederick Baruch, Chairman 
S. L. Goldstein Mrs. J. B. Levison 

Committee on Pharmacy, Dispensary Laboratory and X-Ray 
Joseph Hyman, Chairman 
Mrs. S. S. Kahn Mrs. H. Lippman 

Committee on Kitchen and Diet Kitchen 

Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. S. W. Heller 

Committee on Domestic Service 
Simon Katten, Chairman 
Mrs. M. A. Meyer Mrs. S. Sussnian 

Committee on Visiting and Social Service 
Judge M. C. Sloss, Chairman 
Mrs. Chas. Farquharson Mrs. Manfred Brandenstein 

Mrs. Albert L. Ehrman 

— 39 — 



LADIES' AUXILIARY 



President 
MRS. I. W. HELLMAN, Jr. 

Vice-President 



Secretary 
MRS. MARTIN A. MEYER 

Treasurer 
MRS. J. B. LEVISON 



Mrs. Manfred Brandenstein 

Mrs. A. Brown 

Mrs. Albert L. Ehrman 

Mrs. Charles Farquharson 

Mrs. Flora Ganz 

Mrs. S. L. Goldstein 

Mrs. Wm. Haas 

Mrs. S. W. Heller 

Mrs. S. S. Kahn 

Mrs. M. S. Levy 



Mrs. H. Lippman 

Mrs. A. Mack 

Mrs. Charles Rosenbaum 

Mrs. Milton S'alz 

Mrs. Simon C Scheeline 

Mrs. Florence F. Schloss 

Mrs. M. Siegel 

Mrs. Adolfo Stahl 

Mrs. S. Sussman 



HOUSE STAFF 1917 



Superintendent 
LOUIS COOFER LEVY 



A. L. Cohn 

Dr. Marius Andre Francoz 



Internes 

M. H. Hirschfeld 
Dr. Louis Seligman 



Dr. Jean M. Martin 



Pathologist 
Dr. D. I. Dorn 

Anesthetists 



Radiographer 
O. W. Ginsburg 



Dr. Irvin Wallace 






Superintendent of Training School for Nurses 
Miss Janet E. Cameron 

Assistant Superintendent 

Miss Sayde Willoughby 

Pharmacist 
Miss Agnes Lainer 



— 40 — 



DISPENSARY AND SOCIAL SERVICE 
DEPARTMENT 



DISPENSARY, 2207 SCOTT STREET 



Superintendent of Dispensary 
Louis C. Levy- 
Social Service Director 

Miss Jeanette Newman 

Advisory Superintendent 
Mrs. Dorothy Meininger Bachman 

Clinical Volunteer Workers and Visitors 



Clinical Workers 



Mrs. Manfred Brandenstein 
Mrs. Myrtile Cerf 
Mrs. Leo Clayburgh 
Mrs. Louis Goldman 
Miss Florence Lippitt 
Mrs. Herman Lowenstein 
Mrs. Adolph Mack 



Miss Minna Meininger 
Miss Rita Newman 
Miss Anita Prager 
Mrs. Arthur Seller 
Miss Blanche Son 
Miss Helen Son 
Miss Cordie Weinlander 



Visitors 



Mrs. Charles Farquharson 
Mrs. Miriam Gerstle 
Mrs. Sidney Herzog 
Mrs. Hyman Jacobs 



Mrs. Leon Kauffman 
Mrs. Max Koshland 
Mrs. Reuben Rinder 
Mrs. A. L. Stone 



— 41 — 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 



To the Members of Mount Zion Hospital: 

We have come together again this morning to make 
report of the work done at Mount Zion Hospital during 
1918; to consider and discuss the present conditions of our 
institution, and to outline our plans for the future. 

Before presenting the usual routine matters, I am con- 
strained to make mention of the fact that the Grim Reaper 
laid a heavy hand on Mount Zion during 1916. Prior to 
our last annual meeting but during 1916 our venerable friend 
and co-worker Emanuel Raas was taken away, and later 
in the year our beloved Ex-President William Haas was 
called from our midst while still in the prime of his man- 
hood and while he apparently had many years yet before 
him. Mr. Haas became a Director in 1891, and it can be 
truly said that Mount Zion had no better friend nor 
stauncher supporter than he was nor one whom we could 
afford to lose less, and I am convinced you will approve 
the action of the Board in having elected to take the vacant 
seat his only son, Mr. Charles Haas. 

The Ladies Auxiliary also suffered a very serious loss in 
the passing of their Vice-President, Mrs. Morris Brown, 
who for many years has been one of the most loyal and 
faithful workers, and one whose genial personality will be 
sorely missed by all. 

At our last annual meeting, I made the statement that 
the hospital seemed to have reached the point where it 
might be considered a healthy growing child, and I shall 
now carry this figure a step further by saying that with 
the completion of the third year in our new building we 
can look forward to the time in the near future when we 
may call ourselves really grown up and established. 

The subject I shall refer to first, because of its outstand- 
ing importance, is the completion of the Gunst Dispensary 
Building. We hope to be able to open this building by 
May 1st, and it will require but a casual visit to impress 
one with the wonderful opportunity for the treatment of 
the poor which this will afford. Not alone Mount Zion 
but the entire community owes to Mr. and Mrs. M. A. 
Gunst a great and lasting debt for their generosity and 
liberality. 

The reference to the new dispensary building suggests 
discussing this department of our hospital first. In 1915, 
15,885 cases were treated, of which 3,641 were new patients, 

— 42 — 



and in 1916, 23,885 cases were treated, of which 3,723 were 
new patients. These figures speak for themselves. The 
constructive work that is being done in the dispensary 
under the able direction of Mrs. Dorothy Meininger Bach- 
man and her loyal corps of assistants, is of the very highest 
character, of which the best endorsement is the enthusi- 
asm and interest the members of our Staff have developed 
in their dispensary work. 

The Training School under Miss Cameron is doing 
splendidly. At the present time we have sixty-seven pupil 
nurses in addition to which are employed seven graduate 
nurses including the superintendent. Incidentally, I may 
say that we are now in the very gratifying position where 
out of the seven graduate nurses employed by the hospital 
several are our own graduates. The crying necessity of 
this department is, of course, a new Nurses' Home for 
which, unfortunately, we have so far not been able to ob- 
tain funds. Until this can be done we will have difficulty 
in attracting to our Training School as many of the best 
class of pupils as we should, for the reason that a number 
of hospitals in San Francisco have new up-to-date Nurses' 
Homes, which naturally is an attraction to young women 
who are obliged to spend much of their three or four years 
of study within the Home. 

With respect to our finances, during 1916 our total in- 
come (exclusive of the allotment from Federation) amounts 
to $127,500, against $110,000 in 1915. The total expenses 
were, in round numbers, $155,000 against $134,000 in 1915. 
This left a deficit of approximately $27,500 for the year, 
from which should be deducted $22,700 received from the 
Federation ; in other words, and taking into account our in- 
come from all sources, the shortage for the year was ap- 
proximately $5,000. 

During 1916, 1,274 free patients were admitted to the 
hospital, who were given 17,747 days treatment against 
1,046 free patients with 16,581 days treatment in 1915. Of 
the 1,274 patients admitted, 118 were maternity cases, a 
showing which speaks for itself. 

You will learn from the Secretary's report of the various 
donations and bequests received during the year. I desire, 
in passing, simply to mention the donation of $5,000.00 
from Mrs. Bertha Haas and children in memory of her 
husband William Haas; $1,000 from Mrs. Frances Lezinsky 
in memory of her husband Samuel Lesser Lezinsky; 
$1,000.00 from Mr. A. C. Springer in memory of his wife 
Susie E. Springer, and the Bernhard and Deborah Nathan 
bequest of $5,000.00. 

Your Directors are applying themselves most seriously 
to the problem of placing the hospital on a firm financial 
footing with every hope of success. This has been made 

— 43 — 



possible by the splendid work of the committee of ladies 
under the chairmanship of Mrs. A. L. Ehrman, who have 
succeeded in securing the return of our bonds to the amount 
of $51,000.00 during the year 1916 and quite an additional 
number have been turned in since the end of the year. 
With these bonds cancelled and the lien on the hospital 
wiped out, the Directors expect to secure sufficient funds 
by mortgaging the property to enable them to make what- 
ever improvements are necessary and in addition to liqui- 
date our present indebtedness. If this can be brought about 
and the mortgage so placed as to be taken care of by future 
endowments and bequests our financial troubles will be 
solved, especially if the results of the campaign the Feder- 
ation is about to inaugurate for increased funds results in 
giving the hospital what it properly should have in the 
way of an increased allotment. The names of the donors 
of bonds, as well as the particulars of special donations 
made during the year, appear in the Secretary's report and 
it is, therefore, not necessary for me to mention them here. 

I am glad to be able to report that the administration of 
the hospital is now in very satisfactory shape. Early last 
year Mr. Louis C. Levy was made Superintendent and is 
giving excellent satisfaction. His enthusiasm, untiring 
energy and intelligent effort is making itself felt in every 
department of the institution in the direction of increased 
income as well as reduced expenditures. 

As usual, I am able to say that each and every member 
of the Staff is doing his full share of the work and in a 
manner which calls for our thorough approval and sincere 
gratitude. A Diagnostic Club has recently been organized 
in the hospital following what has been done elsewhere, 
which is already showing excellent results. In this organi- 
zation or Club as it is called, each case is taken up and 
thoroughly analyzed and discussed so that no point can 
possibly be overlooked by an individual member of the 
Staff. I do not have to emphasize the great importance of 
this in the treatment of patients generally. 

During 1916, Miss Bertha Cohen, who was connected 
with the hospital for twenty years, or in other words, from 
the time it was established and who during that period held 
many positions from bookkeeper and cashier to superin- 
tendent, was retired on an annual allowance, the Board 
feeling that she had earned and was fully entitled to this 
consideration in recognition of her many years of loyal 
and faithful service. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary continues to be a more and more 
important feature of our administrative work. The de- 
velopment of the Social Service Department in the dispen- 
sary has opened a new field for efficient work for the 
women, and in the culinary department of the hospital, as 

— 44 — 



well as in the laundry, they have been of the greatest as- 
sistance to the Directors. In fact, it can truly be said that 
the Ladies' Auxiliary is invaluable to the institution. 

Mount Zion appears to be fast approaching the point 
where the anxieties of the past few years, financial and. 
otherwise, will simply be a matter of history. Our adminis- 
tration is in excellent shape and being constantly improved. 
The pay wing of the hospital is meeting with almost uni- 
versal approbation from the medical profession generally. 
Our capacity is being taxed to the utmost in the free patient 
departments, and finally the Jewish community as a whole 
seems to be awakening to a realization of the importance 
of our work and the fact that we are entitled to their as- 
sistance and good will. 

In conclusion I desire to again express my heartfelt and 
sincere appreciation of the earnest and unstinted cooper- 
ation and support given me by each and every member of 
the Board of Directors, which makes what might otherwise 
be burdensome and wearing, a pleasure as well as a most 
gratifying duty. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

J. B. LEVISON 

President. 



— 45 — 



MOUNT ZION HOSPITAL 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1916 



INCOME 
Donations 

Mrs. Jacob Stern, for Maternity and Children's 

Free Ward $ 250.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Moses Heller 250.00 

Mrs. Irma K. Salz 50.00 

Ladies' Auxiliary, towards purchase of blankets 50.00 
Mrs. Oscar Heyman, to Maternity Dept., com- 
memorating birth of Daughter Katherine . . . 25.00 
Mrs. Rappaport 5.00 

630.00 

Memorial Bed Donations 

Mrs. Frances Leszynsky, in memory of 
husband, Samuel Lesser Leszynsky 1,000.00 

A. C. Springer, in memory of wife, Susie 

E. Springer 1.000.00 

2,000.00 

Memorial Room Donations 

Mrs. Bertha Haas and children, in memory of 
husband, William Haas 5,000.00 

Bequests 

Bernard Nathan, to be known as Bernard and Deborah 
Nathan Donation 5.000.00 

Hospital Earnings 

Rooms and Wards 75,041.50 

Operating Room 17,329.80 

Nurses' Board 5,732.75 

X Ray Laboratory 4,539.50 

Pathological Laboratory 3,096.28 

Medicines and Dressings 6,967.29 

Telephones and Postage 719.19 

Guests' Trays 593.20 

Miscellaneous 499.55 

114,519.06 

Interest on Treasurer's balances 31.69 

Returned Insurance Premiums 124.66 

Federation of Jewish Charities, allotment for 1916 22,700.00 

Total $150,005.41 

— 46 — 



EXPENDITURES 

Hospital Maintenance 

Administration 12,488.34 

Professional Care of Patients 38,241.79 

Departmental Expense 29,199.84 

Stewards Department 41,358.07 

General Expense 20,114.06 

Store Room Expense 1,582.68 

142,984.78 

Insurance 2,240.67 

Taxes 3,000.09 

Realty and Improvements 394.00 

Interest on Loans 2,445.51 

Equipment 2,754.44 

Office Expenses 1,076.96 



Total Expenditures $154,896.45 

Expenditures 154,896.45 

Income 150,005.41 



4,891.04 
Written off, uncollectable patients' accounts 3,083.20 



Deficit $ 7,974.24 

Schedule B. SPECIAL DONATIONS 

Donations towards purchase of additional realty — 

E. S. Heller 250.00 

Wm. Kauffman 250.00 

Rosenberg Bros 200.00 

Jacob Blumlein 50.00 

Mark L. Gerstle 250.00 

D. J. Guggenhime 250.00 

Sam Bissinger 250.00 

J. S. Silverberg 250.00 

Dr. R. K. Smith 250.00 

Mrs. A. L. Ehrman 100.00 

Morris Meyerfeld, Jr 50.00 

Wm. L. Gerstle 250.00 

Mrs. Alice Gartenlaub 150.00 

Mrs. George Kohn 250.00 

Mrs. Abraham Stern 100.00 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. . 250.00 

Frederick Baruch 100.00 

3,250.00 

Donation towards purchase of additional realty for use 

of Mount Zion Gunst Dispensary, from Mrs. M. A. Gunst 5,000.00 

Mount Zion Gunst Dispensary — Payments toward con- 
struction of New Dispensary, from Mr. & Mrs. M. A. Gunst 9,000.00 

Visiting Nurses' Fund — Donation from Mrs. Charles W. 

S. Haas 250.00 

Ladies' Auxiliary Donations — 

Miss Irma Wolff 75.00 

Mrs. A. Schwabacher 150.00 

Mrs. Simon S'cheeline 100.00 

Mrs. Florence Schloss 48.00 

Mrs. Rudolph Samson 38.00 

Mrs. Louis A. Schwabacher 190.00 

511.00 

— 47 — 



Donations of Mount Zion Hospital Bonds received 
during 1916 and to date — 

Ludwig Arnstein 1 bond $1,000.00 

Leon Blum 1 " 1,000.00 

Gustave Brenner 1 " 1,000.00 

Abraham L. Brown 1 " 1,000.00 

Mayer I. Cahn 1 " 1,000.00 

L. Dinkelspiel Co 1 " 1,000.00 

Estate of Albert Dernham 1 " 1,000.00 

Albert L. Ehrman 1 " 1,000.00 

Myer Ehrman 2 " 2,000.00 

Mrs. Mathilda and Alfred I. Esberg. . . 1 " 1,000.00 

Herbert Fleishhacker 1 " 1,000.00 

Mortimer Fleishhacker 1 " 1,000.00 

Albert Prank 1 " 1,000.00 

Alexander Goldstein 1 " 1,000.00 

Otto H. Greenewald 1 " 1,000.00 

Moses Greenebaum 1 " 1,000.00 

Hellman, Ehrman & Heller 10 " 10,000.00 

Bert R. Hecht 1 " 1,000.00 

Sig. M. Heller 1 " 1,000.00 

Estate of Herman Heyneman 1 " 1,000.00 

Oscar Heyman & Bros 1 " 1,000.00 

Estate of Julia Hyman 1 " 1,000.00 

Morris Hyman 2 " 2,000.00 

Adolph Kutner Co 1 " 1,000.00 

Dr. Charles G. Levison 1 " 1,000.00 

Isaac Liebes 1 " 1,000.00 

Jesse W. Lilienthal 1 " 1,000.00 

Theresa M. Louisson 1 " 1,000.00 

Henry S. Manheim 1 " 1,000.00 

Albert Meyer 1 " 1,000.00 

Leopold Michels 1 " 1,000.00 

David N. Neustadter 1 " 1,000.00 

Carl Raiss 1 " 1,000.00 

Albert M. Rosenbaum 1 " 1,000.00 

Charles W. Rosenbaum 1 " 1,000.00 

The Rosenblatt Co 1 " 1,000.00 

Daniel Roth 1 " 1,000.00 

J. M. Rothschild 1 " 1,000.00 

Mrs. Bella Schwabacher 1 " 1,000.00 

James & Carrie Schwabacher 1 " 1,000.00 

Henry St. Goar 1 " 1,000.00 

Chas. Sutro 1 " 1,000.00 

Mrs. Hannah Walter 1 " 1,000.00 

John I. Walter 1 " 1,000.00 

Isaac N. Walter 2 " 2,000.00 

Zellerbach, Estate of H. .. 1 " 1,000.00 

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 
Assets 

Cash with Treasurer 57.26 

Cash with Hospital 106.28 

Patients' Accounts Receivable 6,325.05 

Federation— Balance of 1916 Allotment Due. 3,700.40 

Hospital Property — Book Valuation — 

Realty , 13,056.00 

Improvements 143,664.45 

Equipment 42,788.12 

199,508.57 

— 48 — 



Bonds — 

106 Mount Zion Hospital Bonds 106,000.00 



Total $315,697.56 

Liabilities 

Hospital Bills Payable $29,558.64 

Loans — 

Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 16,000.00 

Union Trust Co. of San Francisco 18,000.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities 4,000.00 

— 38,000.00 

Gterman Savings and Loan Society 6,000.00 

Mount Zion Hospital Bond Issue 148,000.00 

Sundry Funds — 

Special Donation Fund 725.00 

Meeting Room and Flower Fund 21.00 

Hydro Therapy Fund 200.00 

Mount Zion and Emanu-El Clinic Fund 2,849.93 

3,795.93 

Federation — Account Proportion of Office Expenses for 1916 709.23 

226,063.80 

Capital Account January 1, 1916 4,608.00 

Suspense Account 93,000.00 

97,608.00 
Less deficit for 1916 7,974,24 

89,633.76 

Total $315,697.56 

Respectfully submitted, 

MEYER H. LEVY, 

Secretary. 



49 — 



Hebrew Board of Relief 

Organized 1900 
Incorporated January 13, 1916 



CONSTITUENT SOCIETIES 

EUREKA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 

FIRST HEBREW BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 

HEBREW LADIES' SEWING SOCIETY 

JEWISH LADIES' RELIEF SOCIETY 

LADIES' UNITED HEBREW BENEVOLENT SOCIETY 

THE HELPERS 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1917 
Officers 

A. ARONSON, Vice-President 

MRS. MAURICE SCHWEITZER, Treasurer 

MEYER H. LEVY, Secretary 

I. IRVING LIPSITCH, Superintendent 

Directors 

Mrs. I. S. Ackerman Henry L. Mayer 

Simon Anspacher Henry G. Meyer 

Mrs. A. Aronson Morris Mitau 

Mrs. Lina Badt Morris Spiegelman 

Mrs. Louis Goodman A. C. Springer 

Mrs. Leo Himmelstern Mrs. Herman Waldeck 

Mrs. J. M. Jacobi Otto Irving Wise 
Manfred S. Kohlberg 

COMMITTEES 
Relief 
A. Aronson, Chairman 
Simon Anspacher Mrs. Hyman Jacobs 

Mrs. B. Arnhold Manfred S. Kohlberg 

Mrs. Lina Badt Henry G. Meyer 

Mrs. F. A. Haber Mrs. Maurice Schweitzer 

Mrs. Charles Isaac A. C. Springer 

Finance and Auditing 

Henry G. Meyer, Chairman 
Samuel Meyer A. C. Springer 

Pensions 
Simon Anspacher, Chairman 
Mrs. B. Arnhold Mrs. F. A. Haber 

Mrs. A. Aronson Mrs. C. Isaac 

Mrs. Lina Badt Mrs. Hyman Jacobs 

— 50 — 



Widows' and Dependent Children's Committee 
Simon Anspacher, Chairman 



Mrs. A. Aronson 
Mrs. B. Arnhold 



Mrs. J. M. Jacobi 
Miss Hilda Steinhart 



Children's Auxiliary 
Hilda Steinhart, Chairman 



Mrs. Henry Abrahamson 

Mrs. B. Arnhold 

Mrs. Edward Brandenstein 

Miss Edith Cohn 

Mrs. S. L. Dinkelspiel 

Mrs. Joseph Ehrman 

Mrs. J. J. Gottlob 

Mrs. Chas. W. Haas 

Mrs. Leo Himmelstirn 

Mrs. J. J. Jacobi 

Mrs. J. M. Jacobi 

Mrs. Ira Kahn 

Miss Alma Levison 

Mrs. Jules Levy 



Mrs. Samuel Lilienthal 
Mrs. Sophie Lilienthal 
Mrs. Martin A. Meyer 
Mrs. Stephen Rau 
Mrs. Leon Roos 
Mrs. Chas. W. Rosenbaum 
Mrs. S. Rosenbaum 
Mrs. A. Rosenblatt 
Mrs. Louis Schwabacher 
Mrs. Maurice Schweitzer 
Mrs. Melville Schweitzer 
Mrs. Joseph S'ilverberg 
Mrs. Henry Sinsheimer 



A. Armuth 



San Bruno District Committee 
Mrs. B. Arnhold, Chairman 

Daly City Committee 
Mrs. Charles Isaacs, Chairman 

Committee on Supplies 
Mrs. Charles Isaac, Chairman 

Committee on Housing 

A. Aronson, Chairman 

Henry G. Meyer 

Committee on Maternity and Caretakers 

Mrs. B. Arnhold, Chairman 

Committee on Camp 
Mrs. Hyman Jacobs, Chairman 

Committee on Employment 
Manfred S. Kohlberg, Chairman 

A. C. Springer Henry G. Meyer 

Committee on Legal Aid 
Otto Irving Wise, Chairman 
Manfred S. Kohlberg 

Committee on Tubercular Aid 
Mrs. F. A. Haber, Chairman 



— 51 — 



HEBREW BOARD OF RELIEF 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Ladies and Gentlemen: 

In presenting to you a report of the work of the Hebrew 
Board of Relief of San Francisco for the year ending 
December 31, 1916, we chronicle the story of one of the 
most fateful years in the history of Jewish relief work in 
this community, a year which made the greatest demands 
upon our initiative, our energy and our ability. 

You will note, from the report of our Secretary, that 
our disbursements for charity, or relief of families and indi- 
viduals, aggregated $85,387.70 as against $70,641.39 during 
the year 1915. For this substantial increase there are a 
number of reasons to which we respectfully call your at- 
tention. 

In the first place the aid which is extended regularly 
every month to those who have become absolutely de- 
pendent through old age, loss of bread-winner, chronic sick- 
ness and other causes, has been increased during the year 
by $6,877-38. A large part of this amount, $3,643.32 was 
contributed by the City and County of San Francisco and 
the Widows' Pension Bureau in excess of the sum received 
from the same sources during the year before. The balance 
represents the increased amount which we found it neces- 
sary to grant to those who were absolutely unable to pro- 
vide for themselves or to look to relatives or friends for 
the help which their condition made imperative. 

For "general relief ' or for help to those who need as- 
sistance when occasional sickness or lack of employment 
makes necessary a helping hand, we were obliged to expend 
$1,662.75 more in 1916 than in the year before. This is 
largely due to the oft-discussed but none-the-less-real in- 
creased cost of supplies. In times when the necessities of 
life are sold at normal figures, the working men and women 
are able, by thrift and economy, to lay aside something for 
a period of unemployment or illness, but when commodities 
are as high as they have been of late, it is almost impossible 
for those whose wages have not kept pace with this increase 
to be prepared to get along unaided when sickness, acci- 
dents and lack of work make their much dreaded ap- 
pearances. 

You will note too, from the financial statement, that we 
paid out for transportation during 1916, the sum of 
$4,044.15, which represents an increase over the year before 



— 52 






of $2,360.70. This was due, in a large measure to the fact 
that the closing of the Exposition found many persons in 
this city who could find nothing to do here, but who had 
relatives in other parts of this State and in the East who 
were able and willing to help them to again become self- 
supporting. It was deemed wise and expedient in many 
cases to return these persons to the places of their former 
residence, rather than to permit them to remain here facing 
idleness and want. It is important to call to your notice 
the fact that $2,712.68 were contributed either by the 
persons whom we sent away or by their relatives and 
friends. 

In this connection we wish to extend our heartfelt thanks 
and our deepest gratitude to the Southern Pacific, Santa Fe, 
Erie and Nickel Plate Railroads and particularly to Messrs- 
James F. Moses, J B. Duffy, Chas. S. Fee, G. T. Slawson 
and their associates, who did everything within their means 
to grant our requests for reduced-rate transportation. For 
their constant co-operation with our organization they de- 
serve and are tendered our sincere appreciation. 

During the year 1916, the Mount Zion Hospital under- 
took to furnish visiting doctors, nurses, surgical, medical 
and dental aid to all those who receive assistance from our 
organization and to others in the community who require 
such aid and whose means will not permit payment there- 
for. For these services we have agreed to pay to the 
hospital the sum of $5,000.00 per year, to enable the insti- 
tution to give to this work the care and attention which it 
requires. We wish to express our appreciation for the ef- 
fective co-operation of the hospital. 

The expense of conducting our work amounted to 
$11,589.53 as compared with $10,117.55 for 1915, but this 
amount is smaller in proportion to our expenditures for the 
year than was the expense of 1915 compared to the dis- 
bursements for that period. It is proper to remind you 
that every well regulated relief organization now recognizes 
that its duty to those who require aid and care makes neces- 
sary the employment of workers of training, experience, 
judgment and intelligence. Service to the poor means not 
only the handing out of money to those who are found 
needy and deserving. It means the teaching of lessons of 
economy, hygiene, proper living and a thousand and one 
others, which can be imparted only by men and women who 
have had proper training and experience and who possess a 
thorough understanding of relief problems and methods. 
Our Directors realize that to secure workers who possess 
these attributes and qualities it is necessary to provide them 
with compensation, w T hich will enable them to maintain the 
proper living standard which their vocations and their 
place in the life of the community demand. 

— 53 — 



We realize fully however, that we cannot do our work 
adequately through our professional workers alone, and we 
are happy to be able to say, that many in this city realize 
this too. We are indeed grateful to the true men and 
women who have, during the past year as in previous years, 
given their untiring devotion, their wise counsel and the 
ungrudging effort in our work of helping the poor. We 
feel however that as our work increases in extent, we shall 
need a larger number of volunteers, ready to respond to the 
call of service. No person does his full duty by his people 
or his community who merely gives of his means or his 
earnings, allowing others to do the planning, the thinking 
and the organizing for the poor and unfortunate in our 
midst. Every Jew and Jewess in San Francisco has some 
time, some energy and some ability which our organization 
can utilize for the benefit of those less fortunately situated, 
and these we ask for and hope to receive. It is our fond 
hope that in the near future a course of training will be 
offered so that those who are willing to undertake work 
for our organization or for others may properly fit them- 
selves for this work. We hope that our friends will give 
serious consideration to the necessity of helping the poor 
along modern constructive lines. 

Our Children's Auxiliary, under the able leadership of 
Mrs- J. M. Jacobi, looked after the physical, moral and 
spiritual wants of 263 children. The members of that body, 
one of the most important of our committees regularly 
visited the homes of these children, and brought to bear 
upon them all the wholesome and splendid influences of 
which they were capable. To this band of devoted workers, 
who willingly put aside their personal affairs to participate 
in this labor of love, we owe much praise and appreciation. 
Every member of the Auxiliary has responded whenever 
and wherever the call for service came, and it is therefore 
hardly possible to single out anyone for special acknowl- 
edgment. 

The Hebrew Ladies Sewing Society and the Helpers 
have co-operated with us in furnishing clothing, hosiery, 
linens and materials for those of our dependent families 
who required aid of this kind. In doing this they have 
lightened our burdens materially and we are indeed grate- 
ful to them. 

The members of our Committee on Employment have 
worked unceasingly to solve the problems committed into 
their hands. They have endeavored to serve not only the 
persons who needed employment but also the employer, so 
that the latter should feel that by accepting persons recom- 
mended by the Committee, he has not merely furnished 
work to the person in need, but that he has obtained a good, 
faithful and conscientious employee. They succeeded in 

— 54 — 



placing many who, because of lack of initiative or because 
of other handicaps, were unable to find work for themselves, 
and they have now the complete confidence of many large 
and small employers of labor. In many instances too they 
have succeeded in securing increased compensation and 
more remunerative positions, acting as the counsellor or 
friend of the worker, and particularly in cases of those who 
were too young in years and experience, and who did not 
know how to go about matters of this kind for themselves. 
We tender them our heartfelt thanks and urge them to 
continue in this work of helping people to help themselves. 

Our Committee on Legal Aid has had referred to it 
during the year a large number of matters for attention on 
behalf of our organization and in the interest of those who 
were unable to pay for professional services of value. We 
. are pleased to report that every matter entrusted to the 
care of the Committee was handled with promptness and 
dispatch, and the results were most gratifying- We extend 
our thanks to the members of this Committee as well as 
to the attorneys who volunteered their services and we 
hope to enjoy their future help. 

In order to provide country vacations for children in our 
care who were declared to be anaemic, we started a Fresh 
Air Fund, which made it possible for us to send to El 
Verano 15 children, who remained there for periods vary- 
ing from four to six weeks. The generous contributors to 
this fund, whose names are given in our Secretary's report, 
are indeed deserving of our appreciation. Every act which 
conserves the health of a child is one whose value cannot 
be measured. It brings generally its own reward. We 
hope to be able to continue this work during the coming 
Summer through the assistance of those who can see the 
importance of safeguarding the lives of our little wards. 

Through the courtesy of the "Bulletin" we were enabled 
to send 87 children to Happyland, each for one week. To 
witness the joy and the pleasure afforded these children 
who would otherwise have been deprived of the advantage 
of a change from city life is sufficient compensation for 
all the difficulties and expense connected with this enter- 
prise, and we wish to express for the children and our 
Board, sincere thanks to Miss Bessie Beatty and her as- 
sociates who helped in this splendid activity, and the North 
Western Pacific R. R. Co. which furnished us with free 
transportation for all these children and their attendants. 

For many years we have realized the necessity of making 
provision for properly housing those who are dependent 
on our organization. We saw that with sufficient at- 
tention the problem of securing good houses at low cost 
could be met. Accordingly out of the generous donation 
made by our colleague, Mrs- Laura R. Dernham, in memory 

— 55 — 



of her husband, Henry Dernham, whose untimely demise 
we chronicled a year ago, we appropriated the sum of 
$1,700.00 which enabled us to build right in our city and 
county a four room cottage, to be known as the Henry 
Dernham Cottage, No. One, modern and complete in every 
detail, which has been rented for $12.00 per month, leaving 
us, after allowing for payment of interest, taxes, insurance 
and depreciation a reasonable return on our investment. 
We consider this merely a beginning — we hope to be en- 
abled, through the generosity of our friends, to build ad- 
ditional cottages in the same or other sections of our city, 
as a demonstration of the fact that good, sanitary, substan- 
tial, modern houses for working people can be built, and 
let at a reasonable rental and allowing a fair profit on the 
amount invested. We propose to designate the cottages, 
which we shall build and equip, after the names of those in 
our community who will place at our disposal means for 
this purpose. This we consider a piece of constructive 
work in our program of community betterment. 

Our experience has taught us that a meager or irregular 
income is the usual precedent condition of dependence, and 
we have realized that to keep people from becoming 
"social debtors" they must maintain a standard of living 
which shall conserve their physical vitality and enable their 
children to attain a better position. But we found that 
many persons lacked the judgment and experience neces- 
sary to adequately furnish and maintain their houses. Our 
visitors often reported the presence of household furniture 
which was light, showy and not especially durable; they 
told of heavy draperies which were not only useless, but 
which served as receptacles for dust and germs ; they called 
attention to generous accumulations of unnecessary utensils 
which interfered with the freedom of the children in the 
household, and they often complained of the difficulties of 
convincing mothers of the nutritive values of simple foods 
for themselves and their families. We found that the prepa- 
ration and selection of foods was not well known to a great 
many housewives, and we concluded that it was incumbent 
on us to teach the forming of dietaries that are well adapted 
to the persons in whom we are interested. 

For a time we experimented with teaching in the homes 
which our workers visited, but we found this unsatisfactory. 
In the month of December, in co-operation with the Em ami 
El Sisterhood, we rented and furnished a three room flat 
in a section in which many Jewish families live. Here we 
hope to demonstrate the possibility of maintaining a family 
consisting of two adults and three children on the wages 
of the average worker, amidst pleasant and healthful sur- 
roundings, with an eye to economy and right living- 
Classes for mothers, for children and for adolescents are 

— 56 — 



maintained at the flat, and they are not only well attended, 
but they are already having a wholesome influence on the 
neighborhood in which a large number of our dependent 
families reside. 

We are not unmindful of the splendid encouragement and 
help which we received from Jewish and non-Jewish organ- 
izations and social agencies in this city, all of whom assist- 
ed us to the utmost of their powers. We extend to them 
all our heartfelt thanks and our deepest gratitude. 

We received during the year from the Federation of 
Jewish Charities the sum of $57,000.00, from the City and 
County of San Francisco $14,060.54 for the care of Com- 
mitted Children, from the Widows ' Pension Bureau 
$7,174.83, in donations $376.00, in donations to our Fresh 
Air Fund $355.00, from Madame Schuman-Heink for holi- 
day gifts for the children in our care $200.00 and from other 
sources $4,857.88. 

Our disbursements exceeded our regular receipts by 
$13,198.01. We were therefore obliged, in order to con- 
tinue our work, to make use of the generous bequest of 
$10,000.00 made to us by the late Bernhard Nathan and 
$5,000.00 donated by Mrs. Dernham. 

We regret that the means placed at our disposal did not 
make it possible for us to provide adequate assistance to 
all those whom, after investigation and observation, we 
deemed entitled to aid. We have, it is true, supplied 
shelter, food, clothing and fuel, and have prevented actual 
starvation and eviction, but we are ready to concede that 
we have not discharged our full duty. Many cases of ill- 
ness, due to lack of proper nourishment, have come to our 
attention; with the help of our sister-institution, the Mount 
Zion Hospital, these men, women and children have been 
restored to health. Yet we feel unable to prevent a recur- 
rence merely because our limited funds do not allow us to 
give to those who need our help a sufficient sum to provide 
good wholesome nourishment, so that they may withstand 
attacks of sickness. We do not believe that our duty ends 
when we have provided against hunger, nakedness and cold. 
We feel that it is our duty to prevent suffering, to avoid 
sickness, to build character and to rehabilitate those who 
have fallen by the wayside. 

We hope that the support given by the Jews of San Fran- 
cisco to their agency for the maintenance of all their 
philanthropic work — The Federation of Jewish Charities — 
will be sufficient to provide our organization with a sum 
large enough not only to grant adequate financial aid to 
those in distress, but also to take steps which shall reduce 
poverty to a minimum. We wish to provide decent living 
accommodations for those whose only crime is poverty. 
We wish to prevent overcrowding in living and sleeping 

— 57 — 



rooms ; we desire to make possible a normal supply of light 
and air; we aim at establishing definite standards of clean- 
liness and decency, and we hope to take measures to prevent 
moral contamination of those who would be most exposed 
to it, and who left to themselves would be helpless against 
it; we wish to help men and women who have failed, to 
help themselves whenever possible. We wish to guard 
against sickness and misery. We wish to grapple with 
important Jewish and general social problems which exist 
in this city- In short we recognize our duties as an agency 
for community improvement. 

We cannot do any of these vital things unless and until 
we are provided with funds. We hope that San Francisco 
Jewry will realize this and help us to do our full duty by 
our people and our city by placing at the disposal of the 
Federation the money required for our work and that of 
our sister societies. 

Since the end of the period covered by this resume of 
our activities, we have been overwhelmed by a great loss 
in the passing away of our honored and distinguished 
president, Sigmund Schwabacher. But a few days have 
elapsed since he was called to lay aside his earthly burdens, 
and we cannot at this moment find words to adequately 
express our sorrow. His days were filled with good works ; 
his heart was ever aflame with pity; his soul was inspired 
to do what he could to aid his fellows ; with unflagging zeal 
and devotion to the cause of the poor, he understood the 
many difficult tasks connected with our work. He was a 
splendid leader, with whom it was a pleasure to serve. 
We mourn his loss deeply, and wish him rest in peace. He 
will serve as an example to others in our organization and 
our community, and we will ever remember his sage 
counsel, his master mind, his geniality and his kindly spirit. 

We have great responsibilities, and the shadows of our 
barren resources darken our ways and make heavy our 
hearts. Our organization is bearing ungrudgingly and 
hopefully the burdens of the community. As pointed out 
to you in previous reports, the funds of our constituent 
societies have been entirely exhausted, and we have no 
means on which to rely except the help which we can hope 
for from the Jewish Community of San Francisco. If this 
will be adequate, we will be able to do our work ; if it will 
not cover our needs we will be obliged to curtail our 
activities. We are merely the instruments of the com- 
munity, and . we hope it will enable us to discharge the 
duties which have been left in our keeping. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE 

HEBREW BOARD OF RELIEF OF S. F. 

— 58 — 



HEBREW BOARD OF RELIEF 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1916 



NCOME 



Federation of Jewish Charities, apportionment for 1916 $57,000.00 

Charity Grants returned by Applicants 214.20 

Contributions towards Special Cases 1,101.25 

Contributions towards Children's Aid — 
Prom City and County of S. F. a/c Committed 

Children $14,060.54 

From Widows' Pension Bureau, a/c Committed 

Childern 7,174.83 

From Parents and Friends towards Children's 

Aid 614.00 

21,849.37 

Contributions towards Transportation 2,712.65 

Interest from Treasurer's Cash Balance 215.38 

Returned Expenses and Insurance Premium 2.90 

Donations 

Mrs. Lillie Guggenhime $ 250.00 

Mrs. Sigmund Schwabacher 100.00 

Mrs. Julia Prescott, com. 75 birthday 10.00 

Dr. Rudolph Coffee, in memory of wife 6.00 

Mrs. Henry Dernham 5.00 

Gullixson Bros 5.00 

376.00 

Fresh Air Fund — 

Mrs. Sig. Schwabacher, com. birth of grandchild 100.00 

Mrs. Henry Dernham 100.00 

Mrs. R. Samson 50,00 

Mrs. Herman Waldeck 25.00 

Mrs. Samuel I. Wormser 20.00 

Mrs. Hyman Jacobs 10.00 

Mrs. Walter J. Samson 10.00 

Abe Ruef 10.00 

Mrs. Sol. Wangenheim 10.00 

Anonymous, per Mrs. H. Jacobs 12.50 

Mrs. Maurice Schweitzer 5.00 

A. C. Springer 2.50 

355.00 

Special Donations — 
Mme. Schuman-Heink, holiday gift for Jewish 

Children 200.00 

Donations in Memory and Bequests — 

Bequest of Bernhard Nathan 10,000.00 

Laura R. Dernham, in memory of husband, 

Henry Dernham 5,000.00 

Bequest of Samuel Wolf Levy 100.00 

15,1000.00 

Total Receipts $99,126.75 

— 59 — 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Charity $84,853.53 

Fresh Air Fund Donation 334.17 

Holiday Gift Expenditures 200.00 

85,387.70 

Federation of Jewish Charities 

Prop, of Expenditures 5,910.23 

Salary and General Expenses 5,679.30 

11,589.53 

Office Equipment 247.53 



Total Disbursements $97,224.76 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES $97,224.76 

TOTAL INCOME $99,126.75 

Less receipt from Donations and 

Bequests 15,100.00 

84,026.75 

Deficit $13,198.01 

ASSETS 

Cash $ 6,468.20 

Due from City and County of San Francisco a/c Com- 
mitted Children 997.75 

Federation due a/c allotment 3,000.00 

Real Estate Mission St. Property 1,716.10 

Secretary's Account 1,000.00 

Bonds, 5 Pac. Light & Power Co. 5% 5,000.00 

Total $18,182.05 

LIABILITIES 

Federation, due Acct. Expenses for 1916 $ 1,351.54 

San Bruno District Special Fund 300.00 

Trust Fund 123.50 

Real Estate Loan Fund 144.75 

Capital Account, January 1, 1917 16,262.26 

Total $18,182.05 



We beg leave to state that we have examined the books 
and accounts of the Secretary, verified all vouchers and find 
same correct and in perfect order, as also the above 
financial statement. 



Respectfully, 



HENRY G. MEYER 
A. C SPRINGER 
SAMUEL MEYER 

Auditing Committee. 



— 60 — 



STATISTICAL LIST OF CASES 
1916 



Number of New Cases — 

Resident 162 

Transient 278 

440 

Number of Recurrent Cases — 

Resident 613 

Transient * 57 

670 

Total Number of Cases Aided 1,110 

Number of Families Aided — 

Resident Recurrent 432 

Transient Recurrent 23 

Resident New 62 

Transient New 55 

572 

Number of Persons in Families 2,218 

Number of Single Persons Aided — 

Resident Recurrent 181 

Transient Recurrent 34 

Resident New 100 

Transient New 223 

538 538 

Total Number of Cases 1110 

Total Number of Persons Aided 2756 

Number of New Pension Cases 28 

Number of Recurrent Pension Cases 151 

Total Number of Pension Cases 179 

Number of Consumptive Cases — 

Resident Recurrent 83 

Resident New 5 

Transient Recurrent 

Transient New 8 

Total Number of New Cases 96 

Number of Cases aided with Transportation 57 

Number of Persons aided with Transportation 82 

139 

Number of Maternity Cases Aided 116 

Number of Free Interments 30 

NATIVITY OF APPLICANTS 

Australia 2 

Austria 99 

Algeria 1 

' — 61 — 



Belgium 1 

Canada 2 

Central America 1 

Egypt 3 

England 27 

France 8 

Germany 109 

Holland 3 

Hungary .--'. 57 

India 1 

Italy 2, 

Jamaica 6 

Roumania 66 

Russia 562 

Singapore 1 

Tunis 1 

Turkey 8 

United States 150 



1,110 
SOCIAL STATE 

Married 340 

Widows (single) 55 

Widows with Families 138 

Deserted Wives 23 

Widowers (single) 19 

Widowers with Families 17 

Divorced (single) 13 

Divorced with Families . . 7 

Detached Men 86 

Married, Childless 50 

Single 362 



1,110 

LENGTH OF RESIDENCE IN COUNTRY AND CITY 

United San 
States Francisco 

One year and under. 46 278 

From 1 to 2 years 29 107 

From 2 to 3 years 20 69 

From 3 to 5 years 147 123 

From 5 to 10 years 290 228 

Over 10 years 578 305 



1,110 1,110 
CAUSE OF DISTRESS 

Out of Employment 237 

Old Age 75 

Insufficient Earnings 123 

Sickness 294 

No Male Support , i45 

Legal Aid — 21 

Imprisonment • • • • I 4 

Investigations 54 

Shiftleness 6 

Transportation 141 

1,110 
— 62 — . 







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— 63 



Eureka Benevolent Society 

Organized October 2, 1850 

Incorporated March 29, 1851. Re-incorporated April 9, 1907. 

Business Office: 436 O'Farrell Street 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1917 

Officers 
SIMON ANS'PACHER, President 
ABRAHAM HAAS, Vice-President 
HENRY G. MEYER, Treasurer 
MEJYER H. LEVY, Secretary 

Directors 

Abraham Haas Morgan A. Gunst 

Joel K. Hecht Albert Meyer 

Samuel W. Heller Henry Sinsheimer 

Otto Irving Wise 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Year Ending December 31, 1916 

A— GENERAL FUND 
Income 

Donations and Bequests $5,288.00 

Returned Insurance 17.60 

■ $ 5,305.60 

No Expenditures. 

Capital Account January 1, 1916 11,638.05 

Capital Account January 1, 1917 . 16,943.65 

B— WIDOW AND ORPHAN FUND 
Income 

Interest $ 7,520.00 

Returned Insurance 2.50 

$ 7,522.50 
Expenditures 

Dispensation to Widows $5,820.00 

Expense 53.85 

5,873.85 

1,648.65 
Less written off on Bonds 1,050.00 

Net Gain $ 598.65 

Capital Account January 1, 1916 147,866.90 

Capital Account January 1, 1917 148,465.55 

Donations and Bequests Received 

Bequest of Herman M. Walter $ 5,000.00 

Bequest of Samuel Wolf Levy 100.00 

Donation from Sigmund, Sarah and Bella Schwabacher 

Trust Fund 188.00 

— 64 — 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 



To the Members of the 

Eureka Benevolent Society. 

It is now two years since you honored me most un- 
expectedly by placing me in the presidential chair, and the 
office came to me with added pleasure from the fact that 
it was occupied by my sainted father for many years. 

For some years your presiding officer has presented no 
annual address, for the reason that the principal part of our 
general relief work was incorporated with the Hebrew 
Board of Relief and its directors have rendered a yearly 
report. 

Many of the younger generation in our community have 
no knowledge or conception of the noble deeds performed 
in the field of charity by the founders of our beloved so- 
ciety, its trustees and volunteer workers, and I trust a brief 
narrative may prove interesting. 

A remarkable fact is that it was organized in 1850 with 
August Helbing as its first president, and I note in Israel 
Cohen's work on "Jewish Life in Modern Times/ ' in his 
chapter on Philanthropy, page 79, he says : "In the younger 
community of New York, the first important charitable 
society, the German Hebrew Benevolent Society, was 
founded in 1859," and think of it, here on the western 
fringe of civilization, thousands of miles from the East, 
our pioneer forefathers, immediately on their arrival, im- 
bued with Jewish piety, provided for their suffering 
brethren in want or distress. We owe them an everlasting 
debt of gratitude, honor and respect, and a fitting monument 
should be erected with their names imperishably engraved, 
to go down to posterity for generations to come as an in- 
centive to them that they may do their duty and uphold 
what our religion, as well as their example taught, to help 
our own people in their misfortune as well as suffering 
humanity. 

Are we doing our duty today by following in their foot- 
steps? Permit me to give you a few details. 

In the year 1902 the honor of becoming a director of the 
board of trustees of our society was awarded me. I was 
one of the first advocates of the formation of the present 
Hebrew Board of Relief, comprised of the four constituent 
societies who were engaged separately in similar work, and 
meeting on four separate days in the week. In those early 
days we had no paid trained investigators who had gradu- 
ated from a university in social economics, but we had the 
volunteer worker, trained by experience, who was willing 

— 65 — 



to make a personal sacrifice of time as well as money in 
visiting the poor and sick and using the same constructive 
methods that we are taught today. The custom at that 
time was for the applicant to appear personally before the 
board and, giving the cause of his distressed condition, 
would make his appeal. As a result it happened frequently 
that the same applicant would appear before each of the 
societies, with his basket and carry away clothing, shoes 
or other necessaries. It was evident that duplication and 
pauperization would follow, but notwithstanding we had 
hard work to overcome the objections of staunch members 
of each society that they would lose their identity as well 
as membership and dues, we finally succeeded, and in 1900 
organized the present Hebrew Board of Relief, which was 
a stepping stone to the formation of the Federation of 
Jewish Charities. Our own beloved Eureka Society as- 
sumed 60 per cent of all the disbursements of the relief 
board, the other three, 40 per cent. 

Our constitution provides that the general fund shall not 
go below $20,000, and the widows' and orphans' fund below 
$140,000. In the year 1900 we had in the general fund 
$19,413.64 and in the widows' and orphans' fund $138,128.27. 

In our strenuous endeavor to relieve suffering and dis- 
tress since the formation of our federation of charities in 
1910, the four societies constituting the relief board have 
become bankrupt, and are left today to the mercy of the 
community, the federation and its executive and sub- 
scription committee. Within the past month we have had 
children at the Mount Zion hospital suffering from mal- 
nutrition, or, in plain English, starvation, and as soon as 
they were convalescent they would be sent to their homes 
to be starved again. This is no exaggeration but a positive 
fact, and I refer you to Louis Levy, the able superintendent 
of Mount Zion Hospital. Besides starvation other mis- 
fortunes almost as bad are being suffered today by our 
Jewish poor right here in this wealthy San Francisco 
community. In some respects their condition is just as 
bad as that of the Jewish war sufferers in Europe. Who 
is to blame? Certainly not the trustees of the relief board, 
but every Jew in the far-famed Exposition City of San 
Francisco who has not in the past and will not now do his 
duty. 

My appeal is to every Jewish head of a family to go in 
the ranks as a charity worker, and if not a member of the 
federation the first thing is to become one and carry a list 
of contributors with you. Use your personal influence to 
obtain members for the federation. We do not ask poor 
people to become members, but we do ask every one 
of you to contribute as much as you can even if it re- 
quires some personal sacrifice. According to my way of 

— 66 — 



thinking a small contribution annually by a poor man that 
involves a personal sacrifice is a greater reward to the inner 
consciousness than thousands of dollars by a man of wealth 
to whom it is no sacrifice at all. 

My appeal is also to the rabbis of large and small con- 
gregations and to each and every one of you to join the 
ranks as an active worker and help the subscription com- 
mittee as they have been unable in the past to obtain the 
results that the necessities demand. The criticisms that 
I have heard from the pulpit and in the community that 
the early volunteer charity worker pauperized the communi- 
ty is a charge that should not go unchallenged. I am willing 
to admit that occasionally the warm human sympathy 
would clash with the cold-blooded efficiency of present-day 
methods, but their constructive work was far better because 
they raised the necessary funds to execute it. Horses and 
wagons were furnished to one or more at almost every 
meeting. Sums of $50 to $500 were given to open small 
lines of trade, and it came back to us because we did not 
pauperize them, but helped them to help themselves. I am 
convinced from my experience that the much-abused 
"Schnorrer," so humorously depicted by Zangwill and 
Montague Glass, is an exception among our Jewish poor 
and not a type. The Jew as a rule is self-respecting and 
many prefer to starve than have it known they are on the 
charity board. The names that come before us are kept 
in sacred confidence, and one of the finest charities that 
I know of was when a few workers assessed themselves 
monthly and made the worthy recipient believe the fund 
came from some wealthy relation, or similar fairy tale, and 
he never knew otherwise as long as he lived. 

The cause of our present distressed condition and large 
number of Jewish poor in our midst is due, first, to the 
immigration from eastern cities, and, second, to the cat- 
astrophe of 1906. Soon after this calamity our society 
purchased the present camp site on First avenue, and the 
relief board obtained the shacks from the city and made 
them habitable and sanitary. At first we took in men, 
women and children, but we have now only adults, princi- 
pally aged persons. We have been severely criticised, both 
by a local committee and an expert who were called in a 
few years ago to survey gur various charities, for maintain- 
ing this camp. The criticism is correct and we required no 
expert to tell us. It has been our intention for some time 
to erect sanitary cottages for these ocupants, and we have 
already built one whole cottage of four rooms and bath in 
Daly City at a cost to the relief board of $1700. At the rate 
we are going we may put up another in five years or so. 
We should have at least fifty, for the reason that it is most 
difficult to get sanitary homes for the poor, and the outlay 

— 67 — 



for rents alone by the relief board in 1916 was $5500. Be- 
tween the year 1906 and the federation of our charities in 
1910 we were assisted annually in large sums from Red 
Cross funds for rehabilitation work. At that time the total 
annual membership due to all societies totaled about 
$45,000, but do not forget that fully as much, and probably 
more, was collected annually in donations, entertainments, 
etc. I remember many years ago annual banquets were 
given by our Eureka Society and subscriptions of $10,000 
and upwards were made. 

The subscriptions to the federation in its first year, 1910, 
was $108,000, and in the past year, 1916, the total was 
$138,000. We had a much more difficult task to organize 
the federation out of the thirteen societies than we had in 
consolidating the Hebrew Board of Relief. Not alone was 
the objection made to the loss of identity but the relinquish- 
ment of various rights and privileges were delegated to the 
federation by each constituent society, and especially that 
of obtaining new members and subscriptions. Originally 
the central idea of federation was that of a collecting bureau, 
and educating the community by propaganda so that it 
would realize its duty and render sufficient aid in money 
to relieve the distress in our midst. Two years ago the 
original constitution was amended and greater power vested 
in the executive committee. The membership at present 
of the federation is about 1700 and we should have at least 
4000. Our subscription should be double in 1917 to what 
it was last year, and if sufficient publicity and influence is 
brought to bear our people will rise to the occasion and give 
adequate aid. 

We owe loyalty to our own city first and appeals from 
the outside should be laid aside until we have put our own 
house in order. What I have stated in the above address to 
our Eureka members applies with equal force to the other 
three constituent societies of the relief board, the "Jewish 
Ladies' Relief,' ' the "Ladies United Hebrew Benevolent," 
and the "First Hebrew Benevolent," and I know I voice 
their sentiment in asking the executive committee and board 
of governors to allow us a larger amount than heretofore. 
We are in dire need of a home for tuberculars in a sheltered 
spot near the city; a home for convalescents as an annex 
to the hospital; a home for incurables; a nursery for 
children; the erection of sanitary three and four-room cot- 
tages, but all of these requirements, which would lighten 
the burden of our relief board, must remain in abeyance 
until we are able to administer first aid and give proper food 
and shelter. 

In conclusion let me refer briefly to the widow and 
orphan fund of our Eureka Society. It has never fallen 
below our constitutional provision and please God it never 

— 68 — 



will. I do not think any organization in the United States 
can show a similar record. It is conclusive proof, I think, 
that the Jew would rather suffer want than accept charity. 
At the present writing we have on our list eighteen widows 
who receive monthly $510, and the fund is just able to meet 
this expenditure. Since the formation of the federation in 
1910 no new members are accepted, and it is the hope of 
your board of directors as well as it was that of our pre- 
decessors that the fund may increase and when no longer 
required some enduring charity may be erected to be known 
as the Eureka that will commemorate in a fitting manner 
its founders as well as the noble band of men and women 
who devote their lives to the greatest of all virtues — love 
of their fellow-man. 

SIMON ANSPACHER, 

President. 



69 — 



Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled 



2504 HOWARD STREET 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1917 

Officers 

JOSEPH HYMAN, President 
EMILE LEVY, Vice-President 
MISS AMELIA LEVY, Secretary 
EMILE E. KAHN, Ass't Secretary 
ISAAC MOSS, Treasurer 

Directors 

Albert M. Bender Mrs. B. Schapiro 

Louis A. Schwabacher A. C. Springer 



COMMITTEES 



Executive Committee 

Isaac Moss, Chairman 

Emile E. Kahn Emile Levy Louis A. Schwabacher 

House Committee 

Emile Levy, Chairman 

Miss Amelia Levy Mrs. B. Schapiro A. C. Springer 

Building Committee 

Emile Levy, Chairman 

Emile E. Kahn Louis A. Schwabacher A. C. Springer 

Finance Committee 
Emile E. Kahn, Chairman 
Albert M. Bender Louis A. Schwabacher 

— 70 — 



REPORT OF THE VICE-PRESIDENT 



To the Members of the 

Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : 

It becomes my duty as Vice-President to make a detailed 
report to the members of the activities and work by your 
Board of Directors during the year of 1916. 

Before reading the report I wish to express on behalf of 
my Co-Directors and myself our great sorrow and regret 
in the loss our charity has sustained in the passing away 
of our late beloved President, Samuel Polack, who was the 
last of the serving directors, who inaugurated this great 
charity in the year of 1888. 

Mr. Polack 's life and soul were bound up in this insti- 
tution from the very beginning, and for twenty-four years 
he presided as President at every meeting, giving his time 
and pecuniary assistance without limit to the institution, 
and it is to him that credit must be given that this charity 
has grown to what it is at present. 

Nothing can better exemplify the labor and sacrifice he 
made for the Home than when I recall the destruction of 
the Lombard Street Home in the great calamity of 1906, 
when our inmates were scattered and found shelter out at 
the Presidio, and although he had passed his seventieth 
year he personally looked after them, and owing to his 
exertion and labor we were able to bring the inmates back 
to a new home, completely furnished, within six weeks 
from the time of the loss of the former home. 

His memory will ever remain in the hearts of those who 
labored with him, and also in the hearts of the inmates, 
whose welfare and comfort was his main thought. 

Mr. Polack needs no memorial, because the Hebrew 
Home for Aged Disabled will ever be such to Samuel 
Polack 's name. He was indeed a true and pious Jew, and 
may he find the peace and rest he so well deserves. 

At the closing of the year of 1915 there were 23 inmates 
in our Home, and there were admitted during the year of 
1916 the following: 

Native of 

Nathan Aronson Prussia 

Isaac Lande Russia 

Henry Percy Meyer New York City 

Samuel Kronberger Roumania 

— 71 — 



Goodman Ginsburg San Francisco 

Joseph Barnett Germany 

Edward Weller Prussia 

Ludwig Gardner Austria 

Solomon Newman Poland 

Mrs. Hannah Levy Germany 

Mrs. Isabelle Bennett London 

Mrs. Fanny Zuckerman Roumania 

Miss Rika Prascoe Germany 

Mrs. Fanny Newman Poland 

Total admitted, 14. 

During the year we lost by death : 
Solomon Kahn 
Joseph Barnett 
James Simon Isaacs 
Samuel S. Phillips 
Mrs. Bertha Schmitt 

Left the Home : Isaac Lande. 

Total loss to the Home, 6. 

Leaving 31 inmates in the Home on January 1, 1917. 

We have had a great deal of sickness at the Home and 
with the extra high cost of living our expenses have in- 
creased $1,834.21 during the year, which will be shown by 
the Secretary's and Treasurer's report. 

Our Superintendent, Mr. Gladstone and Matron Mrs: 
Gladstone, have given their time and labor to make our in- 
mates as comfortable as possible, and have done their best 
to serve the interests of the Home. 

We have endeavored to make our inmates as com- 
fortable as possible, and in this respect I want to mention 
the services of Dr. E. M. Weiss, who is ever ready to 
respond to any call made upon him to relieve the sufferings 
of our inmates, and I wish to tender to him the thanks of 
the Board, as well as the inmates of the Home. 

I desire also to express on behalf of the Board of Di- 
rectors our thanks to the Rev. Doctor Herman Rosen- 
wasser, who is ever ready to officiate at funerals of our 
inmates. 

I desire, especially, to mention the activities of the 
Ladies' Auxiliary, which was organized by our Lady Di- 
rector, Mrs. B. Shapiro, and tender them our thanks for 
the liberal contributions made by them in the supply of 
linens and blankets. 

In reference to the Friedman Will case, I am sorry to 
say that it is still pending. The attorneys, representing 
the Kagan heirs, have appealed to the Supreme Court from 
the decision of Judge Graham, and I am informed that this 
will not be heard before July. Our attorneys are working 

— 72 — 



very earnestly for our interests, and it is our hope to be 
able at the next annual meeting to report a decision in our 
favor. 

Before closing I want to appeal to the members on be- 
half of the institution and its inmates, and ask that they 
take a personal interest in the Home by obtaining new 
members, whereby our income would be greatly increased 
and which would enable us to enlarge our activities. 

The Board has just decided to provide six more beds, 
which will give us a capacity for thirty-seven inmates. 

I wish to express the thanks of the Trustees and Inmates 
to the Federation of Jewish Charities for the liberal al- 
lowance during the past year, as without its support it 
would not have been possible to maintain the Home. 

To my colleagues in the Board, I wish to express my 
gratitude for their able assistance, and with a prayer that 
our institution will grow and keep up its worthy work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH HYMAN, 

Vice-President. 



73 — 



HEBREW HOME FOR AGED DISABLED 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1916 



INCOME 

We received during the year: 
Donations 

Mrs. C. Samson $ 35.00 

Mrs. S. H. Collins 5.00 

Mrs. Johanna Getz 15.00 

Mrs. C. R. Walter 25.00 

Mr. Chas. David 2.00 

Mr. Louis A. Schwabacher 25.00 

Mrs. Eva Samson 25.00 

Mr. Albert M. Bender 107.00 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Newman 100.00 

Mr. M. Strauss 5.00 

Mrs. Isabelle Bennett 500.00 

Mr. David Lande 56.00 

Bequests 
Mrs. Johanna Hart 100.00 

From other sources 

Interest 321.95 

Membership Dues 594.25 

Sundries 317.03 

Federation of Jewish Charities 7,599.40 

$9,832.63 
EXPENDITURES 

Home Maintenance 

Fruit and Vegetables $ 172.50 

Meat, Fish, Poultry 1,058.10 

Groceries, Liquor, Tobacco 1,818.69 

Telephone , 81.02 

Laundry 382.83 

Interments 345.90 

Salaries 2,765.15 

Provisions 749.62 

Medicines 125.47 

Fuel 308.77 

Light and Gas 219.60 

Water 306.88 

Repairs and Supplies 977.91 

Postage, Stationery, Printing 34.20 

Insurance 457.50 

Taxes 563.42 

10,367.56 

Reimbursed Federation for collection of dues for 1915 645.25 

$11,012.81 
— 74 — 



ACCOUNT WITH TREASURER 

Balance on hand January 1, 1^16 $ 3,580.45 

Receipts 1916 9,832.63 



$13,413.08 
Less 

Expenditures 1916 11,012.81 



Cash on hand January 1, 1917 $2,400.27 

Investments 

5 Market St. Railway Bonds 

Realty 

Lot on Lombard St. 50x87.6 

Lot and Improvements 2504 Howard St. 



Respectfully submitted, 



A LEVY, 

Secretary. 



75 



Emanu-El Sisterhood 

Incorporated January 4, 1902 

Location — 1057 Steiner Street 

Dormitory Annex — 1402 Golden Gate Avenue 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1917 



Officers 

MRS. MATILDA ESBERG, President 

MRS. A. L. LENGFELD, First Vice-President 

MRS. M. C. SLOSS, Second Vice-President 

MRS. J. W. STEINHART, Third Vice-President 

MRS. JOSEPH EHRMAN, Treasurer 

MRS. H. U. BRANDENSTEIN, Recording Secretary 

MRS. A. L. BROWN, Corresponding Secretary 

MRS. I. S. ACKERMAN, Auditor 

Directors 

Mrs. J. R. Davidson Mrs. J. H. Neustadter 

Mrs. F. A. Haber Miss Jeanette Pauson 

Mrs. Helen Hecht Mrs. Herbert L. Rothchild 

Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. M. iSalz 

Mrs. S. W. Heller Mrs. Charles Schlessinger 

Mrs. S. S. Kahn Mrs. M. Silverberg 

Mrs. M. S. Koshland Mrs. Joseph Sloss 

Mrs. Milton Levi Mrs. Sigmund Stern 

Mrs. J. B. Levison Mrs. Ernest M. Sultan 

Mrs. J. W. Lilienthal Mrs. I. N. Walter 

Mrs. Martin A. Meyer Mrs. Samuel I. Wormser 

Honorary Vice-Presidents 

Mrs. Clara Baum Mrs. J. Voorsanger 

Mrs. Lewis Gerstle Mrs. L. P. Wiel 

Mrs. I. Lowenberg 

Advisory Board 

Mr. A. Aronson Mr. P. N. Lilienthal 

Mr. J. S. Friedlander Mr Henry S. Manheim 

Mr. Alex. Goldstein Rev. Dr. Martin A. Meyer 

Mr. Morgan A. Gunst Mr. Max Rosenberg 

Mr. J. M. Rothschild 

Resident Head Worker 
Miss Ethel R. Feineman 

Assistant 
Mrs. P. Whittaker 

— 76 — 



EMANU-EL SISTERHOOD 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Fiscal Year Ending May 31, 1917 



INCOME 



Federation of Jewish Charities $ 4,666.75 

Board 3,073.05 

Donations 414.79 

Interest 325.00 

Rents 263.50 

Hebrew Board of Relief 200.00 

Class and Club Dues 134.32 

Sundries 53.00 

Returned Expenses 33.45 

Returned Insurance 10.85 

Total $ 9,174.71 

EXPENDITURES 

Supplies $ 4,109.42 

Pay Roll 3,069.50 

Rents 1,576.00 

Taxes 392.14 

Insurance 51.50 

Recreation Fund 16.00 

Office Expenses 13.50 

Total $ 9,228.06 

ASSETS 

Bonds 

1 7,000 Market St. R. R. 4% $ 5,250.00 

5,000 Southern Pacific R. R. 4% 4,262.50 

9,512.50 

Cash with Treasurer 826.13 

Union Trust Co. of San Francisco, Savings Account 6,893.04 

Anglo-California Trust Co., Building Fund Account 3,824.54 

Scholarship Funds 2,786.62 

Realty 1.00 

Total $23,843.83 

SPECIAL DONATIONS 
Scholarship Funds 

Mrs. Amelia Goldstein $ 1,000.00 

Building Fund 

Mrs. Edna Sultan 500.00 

Mrs. Bertha Haas, in memory of husband, William Haas 100.00 

Samuel Bissinger 100.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Moses Heller 50.00 

Mrs. Louis Sloss 20.00 

Mrs. Lewis Gerstle 20.00 

— 77 — 



REPORT OF THE HEAD WORKER 



To the President, Directors, 

Members and Friends of the Sisterhood: 

It seems strange that after all these years we must still 
introduce ourselves. Or is it rather that the child, long 
petted and mothered, has grown out of its swaddling 
clothes and begs to take her place among the other members 
of the Federation Family? As was stated recently, the 
Emanu-El Sisterhood is now considered the grown-up 
daughter; she stands with her shoulder also to the wheel, 
eager and equipped to assume her responsibilities and to 
do not only her "bit" but also her best. 

What is our first concern? Without question the answer 
is our home for Jewish Working Girls, where twenty-two 
self-respecting, self-supporting girls, aging from 16 to 35, 
are at present residing — three applications pending. Here 
in commodious rather than aesthetic surroundings, these 
young women find and make a home, coming to us from 
local and other orphanages; from their own homes in 
distant cities; or from here in San Francisco, where the, 
aftermath of a marvelous Exposition found many a Cali- 
fornia enthusiast unable to return to the effete East. Under 
no consideration does it accept or dispense any donations 
of old clothing or furniture. This is emphasized because 
of the need of disassociating the idea of a correctional or 
charitable institution and of acquainting applicants as well 
as supporters, with existing facts. 

The household runs itself, exclusive of rent and salaries 
but inclusive of food, light, water, heat, laundry, repairs, 
etc. out of the moneys paid in by the girls. With a larger 
enrollment, of course, we will be entirely self-supporting. 
With the bookkeeping and requisition system, which Dr. 
Langer so painstakingly installed for us and to which he 
and Mrs. Lengfeld have ever since tirelessly given their 
labor and time, much has already been effected, and we 
hope so to perfect our accounts and buying, that maximum 
efficiency will be obtained at minimum expenditure. (The 
detailed financial condition is furnished in the Treasurer's 
Report.) 

For two in a room — single beds, separate dressers and 
separate clothes room, also for laundry and ironing priv- 
ileges — the girls pay one-half of their earning capacity up 
to a certain point. In other words, those earning $7.00 a 
week or less, pay at the present time, $3.00 a week for 

— 78 — 



room, breakfast, and dinner at home and lunches carried to 
work. Those girls earning $7.00 to $10.00 a week, pay 
$3.50 and $4.00 and those earning $10.00 to $13.50 a week, 
which at present is the highest income, pay $5.00 for priv- 
ilege of room alone. In addition to this, every girl, who 
has no outside account, is required to start a savings ac- 
count at the very earliest moment, by paying $0.50 a week 
therein. She is encouraged in so doing by being allowed 
to pay but $3.00 a week for board for a while (if she earns 
but $7.00), in order to put the additional $0.50 a week into 
a savings account, which brings 4% interest, and which has 
proved a splendid nucleus to some girls who never knew 
before the meaning or advantage thereof. 

A spirit of co-operation and individual interest and res- 
ponsibility is encouraged in many indescriptible ways; such 
as, for instance, the planning of the week's menu by suc- 
cessive girls, subject, of course, to approval, whereby each 
girl becomes familiar with food values, food combinations 
and variety, as well as the cost thereof; each learns to un- 
derstand the diverstity of tastes and tempers in so large a 
family and the impossibility of pleasing everybody all the 
time. And altho we have attempted the actual buying and 
preparation of meals in order to teach household manage- 
ment and cooking, we have now transferred all such efforts 
to the Model Flat of which mention will be made further 
on. True, in the Little House Across the Street, the girls 
delight in playing at housekeeping and their Sunday break- 
fast and suppers of their own concoction are, I believe, 
their merriest meals of the week. 

In case there be some who do not know of our little 
house opposite, I want to mention but superficially that 
this house constitutes our Annex to take care of the over- 
flow, where six of the older girls live w T ith my assistant 
in charge, breakfasting there but dining in our main build- 
ing. There, having their own keys, with resultant respon- 
sibilities and privileges, a happy spirit of ownership per- 
vades, creating stimulating rivalry with the Main Building 
and giving excellent scope for emulation because of the 
newer and more artistic furnishings provided there. Suc- 
cessive hostesses serve, not only at the dinner hour but 
especially each Friday night for our larger gatherings, 
when some girls who formerly were most reticent or 
morose, have developed an art of hostesship and a pride 
of home which gives as much joy to their own hearts as 
to others. Various "Good Works' ' funds and fines, house 
committees and self-government rules, are other means by 
which the girls develop the "house spirit." 

In short, as happy and homey a spirit of companionship, 
consideration, and co-operation exists now as has ever been 
obtained; a spirit not of "harmony alone, but of melody' ' 

— 79 — 



where many impressed rather than repressed, are trying 
to be self-reliant and resourceful, to assume their share of 
life's responsibilities, and at the same time to get a tremen- 
dous lot of fun in so doing. This to me, is the supreme 
test of an individual or an institution. Training and leaders 
are only necessary in the formative stages — to lay foun- 
dations and to install machinery — or to furnish oil now and 
then. But once given the impetus, the motive force must 
continue to come from within. However joltingly it runs — 
it is the force within, forever combating those forces from 
without, which becomes either dangerously balked or pro- 
ductively, creatively expressed. 

Before leaving the Resident feature, for it is a part 
thereof, rather than purely social, just the barest allusion 
must be made to our now famed Friday Evenings. Ushered 
in with a short home service at the table, where the kindling 
of the candles and blessing of the bread fosters within 
each silent heart a realization of protection, love, and an- 
chorage, the dinner is followed by an Open House to all. 
Here week after week, we have maintained a series of 
concerts, lectures, and entertainments which have been of 
such unremitting high standard that the crowds increase 
as the months roll by, and those who have contributed so 
generously of their talent — professional as well as amateur 
— have gone away and returned to us again and again with 
joy in their hearts equalling the gratitude in ours for what 
they have been able to give. 

Second in importance to the Resident feature, is not, in 
my opinion, the program of classes and clubs held here 
every afternoon and nearly every evening for the little and 
big people of the Neighborhood, but the indescribable spirit 
back of them, and the intangible hold that the Sisterhood 
has upon the entire Neighborhood, yes, even beyond the 
Neighborhood. As far as the Resident girls are concerned, 
one now living and working in Oakland, rarely misses a 
Friday evening here ; others equally distant or married, 
also return ; and still others in far away cities write devoted 
and longing letters "home" eager for news of the " Fam- 
ily,' ' and keeping us in touch with their hopes and plans. 
But farther reaching and of even greater significance, is the 
fact that the Sisterhood House is a House of Friendship 
and Bureau of personal Service in the neighborhood at 
large. Those coming here never come for money or relief; 
they come for confidences and advice and guidance, which 
judiciously given and heeded, keep many from the keenly 
disgrace of appealing to the Charities. Nor is the influence 
wielded over girls and young women only, although our 
efforts in securing employment are confined within this 
field. Only last week a temperamental young boy, 16 years 
old, came over to say " good-bye' ' before he ran away from 

— 80 — 



home. Of course, he did not run and family matters have 
since been adjusted. The same evening the father of one 
of our former Resident girls and the mother of a neighbor- 
hood one, came to be steered out of domestic complications ; 
young men friends of our girls come with their financial 
or sentimental confidences and our little Beau Parlor could 
enfold many a tale. Tormented wives have been sent to 
the Free Legal Aid and anxious mothers to the Juvenile 
Court for help which the Sisterhood is unable to render. 
Again, the mother of one of our tiniest children comes in 
every week, paying carfare or walking, from far out on 
Sacramento Street, to have her child taught sewing, "be- 
cause there ain't no place near so good like the Sisterhood." 
She has just made arrangements for this same child to 
enter the Dancing Class on another day; for her ten year 
old son to enter our new class in Music, and for herself 
to join the Thursday Amarath Club and a new class in 
millinery for Mothers, which is to be started at the Flat 
in answer to a persistent appeal. She has further asked to 
bring her husband for the Parents' Nights and so our circle 
is complete. 

Thus can the Sisterhood become a force, not alone in 
neighborhood but in city-building as well. And it is because 
of this desire that these facts are brought home to you ; not 
because of what is now going on, but for what we can and 
should become. Worthy as is the boarding-home itself and 
eager as we all are to enlarge and beautify it, still the very 
word "home" signifies privacy and non-institutionalism 
and as such it must not be too broadly discussed or ad- 
vertised. But in our Neighborhood Work — and eventually 
the two must function separately — an entirely different at- 
titude is necessary. People now are seeking Sisterhood ; 
but soon we must go out and seek the people; we must 
learn the needs and desires of our neighborhood to a larger 
degree than has so far been possible ; we must discover the 
strength and weaknesses and possibilities thereof. To quote 
Jane Addams, "So far as a Settlement can discern and bring 
to local consciousness, neighborhood needs, which are com- 
mon needs, and can give vigorous help to the municipal 
measures through which such needs shall be met, it fulfils 
its most valuable function." 

Our Settlement is doing good work with the aid of many 
intelligent helpers, in so far, or just so far as its influence 
reaches. But how far shall it reach? How far shall we 
link up with other organizations of constructive or educa- 
tional character and to what ends are we willing to go? 
We are now in a changing, uncertain condition, as is true 
of the entire world. Through our flexibility and our 
powers of quick recognition and adaptability, united with 
a clear vision ahead to see beyond present obstacles, we 

— 81 — 



shall either gain strength in adjusting ourselves to rapidly 
changing methods, demands, and environments, or through 
our blindness, inaction, and self-satisfaction, we shall lose 
all power of social experiment and exploration and cease 
to be a social unit. The effects of the ghastly war abroad 
and imminent seriousness within our own borders will place 
a different aspect upon all endeavors. 

In his recent excellent Report, our worthy President of 
the Federation, pointed out to you and pleaded with you to 
recognize and respond to the needs of the Federation, which 
itself is cognizant of the constant changes in the social 
scheme. Our Federation should not have to plead; the 
many constructive auxiliaries to which he referred, must 
not be retarded because of lack of funds or because of de- 
mands elsewhere. Preventive agencies must be enabled to 
serve their purpose of preventing, so that those who come 
for medical or spiritual advice, for education, recreation, 
or employment will obtain all of these without the stigma 
of having to become a charity case. And, that when they 
may go from us, they will go better equipped — for the need 
is greater now than ever — to cope with the ravages and 
aftermath of this unparalleled war. Then and then only, 
will our relief stations and pensions be reduced, and only 
then "out of the most persistent and intelligent efforts to 
alleviate poverty will in all probability arise the most sig- 
nificant suggestions for eradicating poverty/ ' 

One of our most earnest attempts towards just such era- 
dicating of poverty through prevention, has been the open- 
ing on December 1st, 1916, of our Housekeeping Center 
at 516V2 Linden Avenue. Here, some seven blocks away 
in a thickly populated side-street, where the Russian or- 
thodox families prevail, the Sisterhood found a neat, little 
three-room flat with bath for $13.00 a month. Through an 
enlightened consciousness and social vision — the recognition 
and adaption hitherto referred to, for which your Head 
Worker cannot express adequate appreciation — the Sister- 
hood Board immediately grasped the possibilities and gen- 
erously supplied, individually and officially, the necessary 
funds to begin. With equal readiness and discernment, the 
Superintendent of Social Service, Mr. Lipsitch, also recog- 
nized its potentialities and through his approval, and every 
ready advice and co-operation, we were encouraged to un- 
dertake the experiment. Furthermore, Mr. Lipsitch very 
kindly guaranteed to the Sisterhood that the Hebrew Board 
of Relief would share expenses up to a certain point, in 
that its beneficiaries should be the first ones we hoped 
to reach and help, thus making possible installation and 
operation. However, the new little Flat received its 
greatest impetus when a well-known business man, Mr. G. 
Lachman of Lachman Brothers, responded to an appeal 

— 82 — 



and very generously agreed to furnish our entire flat, for 
us, giving of his time and advice as well as of his furniture. 
The latter, however, we minutely and painstakingly kept 
within the limits of our imaginary family, whose income 
being approximately $65.00 monthly, would permit of only 
this kind of dresser or that kind of kitchen table. Thus, 
throughout the furnishings, we never lost tho't of our main 
purpose — to demonstrate to our neighbors what could be 
done and what should not be done with very limited in- 
comes. In kitchen ware, Mr. Meyers, thru Nathan-Dohr- 
mann's, and in linens Mr. H. Elsbach, also generously con- 
tributed. The same excellent and untiring House Com- 
mittee which helped furnish the cottage opposite, namely, 
Mrs. J. B. Levison and Mrs. H. U. Brandenstein, gave 
their artistic services to the Flat; and to them, also to 
an augmented Committee appointed since, namely, Mrs. A. 
Mack and Mrs. S. Langer, do we express our sincere grati- 
tude for unflagging interest and assistance. 

Now as to the operation of this Housekeeping Center. 
As a Resident Instructor, Mrs. A. Levitas was secured, 
who, lately employed as an investigator of the Hebrew 
Board of Relief and formerly Domestic Science Teacher 
in the evening schools of New York City, we felt was 
admirably equipped to demonstrate and instruct. Through 
the love and enthusiasm of Mrs. Levitas for the work as 
well as for the people of the neighborhood, she has popu- 
larized the little Center to such an extent that some of 
those neighbors who were most suspicious and tradition- 
bound, have become ardent supporters and actually ooze 
pride and ownership when visitors appear. Both Mothers' 
Clubs, as well as the Children's Clubs rivalled one another 
in making curtains, bed covers, and dish towels. Even 
the fathers and brothers helped in the carpentry. An en- 
tire neighborhood was roused as they were seldom roused 
before, to a sense of their own possessions and a dependence 
upon their own resources. Afternoon classes are held for 
the different groups of mothers and younger children from 
10 to 12 years of age and for the Business Girls there 
are evening clubs. In addition to these regular classes, 
Mrs. Levitas endeavors to do intensive and follow-up work 
into their homes. She accompanies mother or daughter to 
the market, there showing cuts of meat as well as food 
values and economies. In the canning and preserving 
season she will be at her busiest and with children as well 
as with mothers she will demonstrate the use of hitherto 
wasted foods and the need of rigid, careful planning. Thus 
are the pupils taught to coalescent tho't with action and to 
14 attain harmony between their theory and their lives.' ' 

Hurrying now to the other activities of the Sisterhood, 
the fact must be stressed, that a Report such as this, if it 

— 83 — 



be at all comprehensive, is almost endless in its length. 
For, unlike other similar organizations, ours has three very 
distinct features, — (1) the Dormitory, (2) the Educational 
and Trade Classes, and (3) the Neighborhood and Personal 
Service Work, among which the new flat necessarily takes 
time and space to describe, and any one feature of which 
would fill a good-sized report. Your indulgence is there- 
fore craved a few minutes longer while some superficial 
mention is made of the Class and Club Work. Without 
exaggeration, I want to announce that the standardization, 
efficiency, and influence of the latter within the past year 
is one of the most gratifying of all retrospections, and one 
of the factors which has helped to popularize the Sister- 
hood. Lest any misunderstanding accrue as to whom the 
credit is due, I further wish to emphasize that this in- 
creased efficiency and far-reaching popularity are entirely 
traceable to the unflagging services and able direction of 
Miss Grace Wiener in the Sewing Classes; of Mrs. Frances 
Weinburg in the Typewriting and Stenography Classes and 
other evening activities; and to the large corps of very 
competent, faithful, and enthusiastic volunteer workers who 
have given so liberally and loyally of their time, talent, 
and efforts. It is always customary to conclude with elo- 
quent expressions of thanks to the assistants in any insti- 
tution. But I feel very keenly that in this case mere formal 
or public expressions of thanks cannot possibly convey my 
deep feeling of heartfelt appreciation; a sense of comrade- 
ship and co-operation with all of my splendid co-workers; 
a realization of their sacrifices and their patience; and a 
fervent prayer that as each has given so may each receive, 
in heart happiness and soul satisfaction, "For those who 
bring happines to others," says Barrie, "cannot keep it 
from themselves.' ' 

I shall not as in last year's report, enumerate the various 
activities and their scope, but shall submit herewith our 
present schedule, which at least conveys some idea of the 
work attempted. As to results actually accomplished, I can 
but refer you to our exhibitions, the result of less than one 
year's work; to the Millinery Class in particular, under 
Miss Feldheim's inspiring leadership, being but the result 
of scarcely more than two month's instruction. From the 
little bulletin, compiled entirely by the Resident Girls and 
Children, you can also discover their attitude and enthus- 
iasm. And,. by the more regular attendance in the Classes, 
you can glean not only a greater interest and responsibility 
on the part of the kiddies, but also the effects of systematic 
and very efficient home visiting, which Miss Malvina Simon 
very generously and gratuitiously does for us every week, 
following up our absentees and making excellent reports 
and returns thereon. Thus everybody and everything com- 

— 84 — 



bine joyously to that success which is of such happiness to 
all of us, and which helps to create an atmosphere " where 
idealisms runs high" and where youthful enthusiasms never 
die out. In fact, again to quote Miss Adams, "a settlement 
is above all a place for enthusiasms, a spot to which those 
who have a passion for the equalization of human joys and 
opportunities are early attracted/ ' So may Sisterhood at- 
tract and hold always! 

Do not think that with all this roseate portrayal we fail 
to see our shortcomings, or recognize and profit by our 
mistakes. Firstly, there is a deplorable lack of higher arts 
and crafts in the Sisterhood — a lack of response, or perhaps 
stimulus as yet, to the aesthetic. Even this deficiency, 
however, can and will be overcome when different surround- 
ings will inspire different efforts and latent powers. At- 
tempts have been laboriously made but a chain of mis- 
fortunes has delayed or totally interrupted. In our dramatic 
work particularly, has this been true. We shall not give 
up, however, until a real Sisterhood production or pageant 
has been given, and to that goal we are bending every 
effort. The class in aesthetic dancing under Miss Marks' 
delightful leadership is already giving particular promise. 
Our Summer Camp or Week-end Lodge has also remained 
still a longing and a striving, which painstaking effort has 
not as yet bro't to fruition. But this too, seems nearer 
fulfilment in the coming months. 

In Music, we have the promise of a splendid teacher, 
who will voluntarily conduct a class twice a week after the 
holidays, the children to pay ten cents a lesson. As far 
as private instruction is concerned, we have several very 
excellent teachers who give vocal and instrumental train- 
ing in their own homes to our girls and boys. Advantage 
also has been taken of every concert and play to which 
generous friends have sent tickets, including the Children's 
Theater for the production of the "Snow Queen/ ' to which 
over a hundred of our children were treated at various 
times. Whereas our Current Topic Club, under the faith- 
ful leadership of Mr. Levin and Mr. Goodman; the Araa- 
rath Alumni with Mrs. Silversberg, Mrs. Jos. Sloss, and 
Mrs. H. U. Brandenstein to help steer; the Mothers' Club 
with Mrs. F. A. Haber, Mrs. Gosliner and Mrs. S. S. Kahn 
as loyal Directors; to say nothing of the Play Club under 
enthusiastic Miss Greenberg, who has taken playground 
courses especially at the University in order better to 
lead our work here; the delightful little Sunbeam Club 
under the sunbeam leadership of Mrs. Rinder; and the 
oldest of all the evening clubs in point of existence, namely 
the Bluebird Club, just fourteen months old, which Mrs. 
Weinburg has brought with such flying colors, augment- 
ed by the splendid Parents' Club Nights — the last Sunday 

— 85 — 



of every month — all are flourishing. And so we feel that 
after all we have no cause for discouragement, but only 
for faith and hope and renewed efforts. And above all, 
for unutterable appreciation. There has been so much to 
recount and to detail, that we have had no time for con- 
sideration of larger interests and greater issues, but these 
are ever in mind and constitute our highest hidden pur- 
poses. 

But now as a fitting climax, I want to express heart- 
felt gratitude to those who have made all of the foregoing- 
possible; to my beloved President particularly, who has 
been staunch and kindly guide, to direct us away from 
the brambles and on towards the goal; to my Board of 
Directors who so ceaselessly spur one on to greater and 
greater accomplishments, by their enthusiastic and un- 
flagging co-operation ; to my very competent assistant, Mrs. 
Whittaker, a mother in actuality and management, but a 
girl in spirit and enthusiasm, whose sympathetic under- 
standing of girl life and girl needs has endeared her to 
everyone of us; to all the co-workers in this and other 
organizations, including Miss Newman and others at Mount 
Zion Hospital; to Doctors Meyer and Langer with their 
ever-ready response ; and to Superintendent Lipsitch whose 
coming has brought a new understanding of local needs, 
and whose support, advice, and assistance have been given 
in as gracious and generous a measure as they are now 
appreciatively and earnestly acknowledged. 

As the pebble is cast into the waters and the circle ever 
widens and intercircles with others, so do we of the Sister- 
hood cast our first year's pebbles into the new channel of 
the onward rushing stream of social undertakings. The 
time is not far distant when San Francisco, like its sister 
cities, will awake to its civic responsibilities, when it will 
provide more Playgrounds and Field Houses and Social 
Centers; when Recreational Facilities will be within the 
reach of all ; when municipally run, clean dance halls and 
filtered swimming-pools, and equipped gymnasiums will 
satisfy the socially hungry, socially unsatisfied, and now 
socially drifting groups of girls and boys whom the 
Settlements cannot reach and the homes cannot shelter; 
who, in their craving for pleasure and excitement, cannot 
discern the glitter from the gold, the trivial from the true. 
Nietzsche says, " The great optimists, it can never be too 
strongly urged, are those who know that the world can be 
made a much happier place for all to live in as rapidly as 
the good that is fundamental in most men and women is 
permitted to come in contact with the evils of the social 
order, " and to strive to correct them. With the initial 
hold which the Sisterhood has upon the young to stem and 
direct the tide, to what lengths can it not go in civic and 

— 86 — 



economic usefulness? May we be further privileged with 
all hands at the oars, to steer our ship, which means so 
much to so many. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ETHEL R. FEINEMAN. 






87 — 



Hebrew Free Loan Association 

Organized June 17, 1897 

Incorporated December 17, 1897 

Business Office — 745 Laguna Street 



OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES FOR 1917 

Officers 

M. SPIEGELMAN, President 

WIL<LJAM G. WEISS, Junior Past President 

HARRY K. WOLFF, First Vice-President 

S. KRAGEN, Second Vice-President 

D. LANDE, Secretary 

P. L. BALLEN, Treasurer 

S. HODES, Custodian of Valuables 



L*. Abrams 
M. Blackfield 
C. Cahen 
Emil Conn 



Trustees 



A. Sugarman 
A. Spiegelman 
J. Waxman 



M. Blackfield 
Emil Conn 
J. Schlussel 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

Auditing Committee 

A. Spiegelman 
Wm. Traube 
J. Waxman 



L. Abrams 



Hall Committee 
C. Cahen 



Emil Cohn 



M. Blackfield 



Collection Committee 
J. Schlussel 



Wm. G. Weiss 



# # * 



Our office is open for business daily from 9 A. M. to 
12 M. and 1 to 4 P- M. except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays. 

The Loan Committee meets every Sunday morning from 
9:30 till 12 o'clock. 

Applications for loans should be made during the early 
part of each week. 

— 88 — 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



HEBREW FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION 
For Year Ending December 31, 1916 



INCOME 



From Federation of Jewish Charities $ 2,554.30 

" repayment on loans 26,488.05 

" donations 5.00 

rents 22.00 

sundries 19.40 



$29,088.75 
EXPENDITURES 

Loans — to 534 borrowers $27,697.50 

Less checks for loans returned 620.00 

■ 27,077.50 

Administrative Expense — 

Salaries 940.00 

Sundries 322.75 

Rent 240.00 

Painting and stationery 71.80 

Collector's Commissions 274.90 

Insurance 21.40 

1,870.85 

$28,948.35 

Surplus $ 140.40 

Total amount loaned $27,077.50 

Repayments on account loans 26,488.05 

Excess expenditures account loans $ 589.45 



STATISTICAL TABLE OF LOANS 

No. Denominations Amounts 

1 at $ 2.50 $ 2.50 

3 " 3.00 9.00 

21 " 5.00 105.00 

5 " 10.00 50.00 

2 " 15.00 30.00 

6 " 20.00 120.00 

85 " 25.00 2,125.00 

8 " 30.00 240.00 

4 " 35.00 140.00 

2 " 40.00 80.00 

306 " 50.00 15,300.00 

6 " 75.00 450.00 

1 " 96.00 96.00 

78 " 100.00 7,800.00 

1 " 150.00 150.00 

5 " 200.00 1,000.00 



534 Total $27,697.50 

— 89 — 



Free Burial Society 

Incorporated December 1, 1888 
Business Office: 436 O'Farrell Street 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1917 

Officers 

MRS. GEO. GREENZWEIG, President 
MRS. M. DALLMAN, Vice-President 
MRS. J. A. HEINEBERG, Treasurer 
MRS. CHAS. KALISKY, Secretary 

Directors 
Mrs. J. Berg Mrs. B. Phillips 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Year Ending December 31, 1916 



INCOME 



From Federation of Jewish Charities ? 450.00 

" Interest 230.04 

" Returned Expenses 35.00 



EXPENDITURES 



? 715.04 



Interments $ 725.20 

Administrative Expenses 4.00 

$ 729.20 

Excess Expenditures over Income. $ 14.16 

ASSETS 

Cash — Treasurer's Account $ 712.85 

Bonds i 4,000.00 



$4,712.85 
— 90 — 



Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Society 

Organized December 15, 1869 
Business Office: 436 O'Farrell Street 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1917 

Officers 

MRS. I. S. ACKERMAN, President 

MRS. E. MANDEL, Vice-President 

MRS. HERMAN WALDECK, Treasurer 

MRS. DAVID KLINE, Secretary 

MRS. WM. HIRSCHFELD, Honorary Superintendent 

Directors 

Mrs. A. Aronson Mrs. Hugo Rothschild 

Mrs. B. Arnhold Mrs. Nellie Saalburg 

Mrs. L. Goodman Mrs. M. Schweitzer 

Mrs. Abe Haas Mrs. J. O. Hirschfelder 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Year Ending December 31, 1916 



INCOME 



From Federation of Jewish Charities $1,000.00 

Relief Contributions 325.00 

Bequests 100.00 

" Interest 364.24 

$1,789.24 
EXPENDITURES 

Clothing and Materials $2,305.55 

Administrative Expense 102.79 

2,408.34 
Excess Expenditures over Income $ 619.10 

ASSETS 

Cash, Treasurer's Account $ 66.06 

Bank Deposits 9,029.59 

$9,095.65 
— 91 — 



Jewish Educational Society 



Organized August, 1897 
Incorporated November, 1897 



OFFICERS FOR 1917 

BEN SCHLQSS, President 
RABBI M. A. MEYER, Vice-President 
RABBI JACOB NIETO, Secretary 
BEN J. HARRIS, Treasurer 

Directors 

Aaron Altman Rabbi Jacob Nieto 

Samuel T. Breyer Ben Schloss 

Bernard Diller Lucius L. Solomons 

Benj. Harris Abraham Sugarman 

Rabbi Martin A. Meyer M. H. Wascerwitz 

SCHOOLS CONDUCTED 

HAYES VALLEY, Hayes and Laguna 
REV. H. SAMUELSON, Principal and Teacher 

Teachers 
Miss Rose Abramowitz Mr. Herbert Rabinowitz 

Sessions Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30 to 5 P. M. 
Saturday and Sunday, 10 to 11:30 A. M. 
Week day Sessions held in the morning during Public School 
Vacations. 

SAN BRUNO, Berlin and Bacon, near Public School 

REV. S. MARGOUS, Principal and Teacher 

Sessions in rooms of Council of Jewish Women 

Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30 to 5 P. M. 

Weekday Sessions held in the morning during Public School 

Vacations. 

DALY CITY, In School Rooms of Synagogue 

Re-established March 19, 1917 

REV. S. MARGOLIS, Principal and Teacher 

Sessions Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 3:30 to 5 P. M. 

In the Morning during Public School Vacations 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Year Ending December 31, 1916 



INCOME 

Federation Allotment 1916 $3,000.00 

EXPENDITURES 
Maintenance of Schools $2,609.31 

Surplus 390.69 

ASSETS 
Bank Deposits $1,667.99 

— 92 — 



The Helpers 

Organized 1889 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1917 

Officers 
MRS. J. M. JACOBI, President 
MRS. LEO. HIMMELSTERN, Vice-President 
MRS. IRVING STEINMAN, Secretary 

Directors 
Mrs. Hugo Abrahamson Mrs. Sophie Lilienthal 

Miss Edith Conn Miss Belle Nathan 

Mrs. Isaac Frohman Mrs. Leon Roos 

Mrs. Ira Kahn Mrs. Melville Schweitzer 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Year Ending December 31, 1916 



INCOME 

Federation of Jewish Charities — Allotment for 1916 $ 750.00 

Donations — 

Pesach contributions* $ 25.00 

Anonymous 10.00 

Mme. Schuman Heink 100.00 

135.00 

Contribution towards Employment Fund 72.00 

Interest 28.98 

Hebrew Board of Relief — Contribution towards Clothing.. 300.00 
Returned Expenses 18.75 

Total Income $1,304.73 

EXPENDITURES 

Relief Expenditures — 

Towards purchase of clothing and material for same $ 924.51 

To Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Society — 

Contribution towards clothing 325.00 

$1,249.51 

Deposit in Savings Bank 28.98 

Cash on Hand, January 1, 1917 135.58 

$1,414.07 

Income $1,304.73 

Expenditures 1,249.51 

Gain $ 55.22 

ASSETS 

Cash in Bank, Treasurer's Account $ 135.58 

Cash in Savings Bank 746.66 

Total $ 882.24 

— 93 —